Algonquin Regiment

Discussion in 'Canadian' started by Marius, Nov 17, 2011.

  1. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    Struck off Strength from a replacement unit would have have a corresponding TOS (Taken on Strength) by another, in this case the Algonquins.

    The X designation was simply the army method of identifying the current status of personnel:

    X1 - prisoner of war (P.O.W.)
    X2 - detention
    X3 - hosptial
    X4 - reinforcement
    - reinforcement in transit
    X5 - on course
    X6 - missing
    X7 - on loan
    X8 - in transit
    X9 & X10 - waiting return
     
  2. 17thDYRCH

    17thDYRCH Senior Member

    Rachel,
    Canadian service records of 166 pages?
    Would you mind posting? We as a group can take a closer look.
     
  3. rachel21mac

    rachel21mac Member

    17thDYRCH: The file won't upload; it's too big (67,765 KB). Is there another way I can post it?
     
  4. rachel21mac

    rachel21mac Member

  5. klambie

    klambie Senior Member

    Rachel,

    Sounds like you have it, would be typical to go from a CACRU (Amd Corps Reinf) to a CIRU (Inf Reinf) before being posted X4. If you see no sign of that kind of change before he sailed, might indicate he got little if any Infantry refresher training before he went to France. It's also often necessary to look on multiple documents to piece together the full picture. There are at least two docs where you should see SOS/TOS entries to various units.
     
  6. klambie

    klambie Senior Member

    Rachel,

    Have had a quick look at his file, appears my guess was close. He in fact went to a CARU (Arty Reinf) for his refresher training. He got through 2 weeks of the 4 week course before he was posted to NW Europe. Bureaucracies make mistakes and it resulted in a man with over a year in the Army going into infantry combat with 2 weeks of recent training and memories of his 8 weeks of basic training after enlisting.

    Unfortunately, I see nothing that hints at his role with the Algonquins. Medical documents at the time he became a casualty can give clues, but I see none. At least 9 other fatal casualties on the date of his death (from one of the casualty reports), so more difficult to place him if you can find details on events that day.
     
  7. rachel21mac

    rachel21mac Member

    Hello all,

    Just a quick update...sorry I've left you hanging but yesterday was the last day of school so I had a busy week or so in there.

    The Cardston Historical Society was a bust - they don't have any information beyond what is on their website (which is incorrect, by the way). If I worked for them, I would be all over this and looking for family members in the area. But they're probably a volunteer organization.

    My daughter and I were going to take a trip down and see if we could get some information from the Legion or the church, but my car broke down Thursday night and won't be fixed until Monday or Tuesday and, since I leave next Sunday for the Netherlands, there's no other time to go.

    Anyway, I have been able to compile the story (or a story of sorts) about L/Cpl Asplund's service and his last days, thanks to all of you. I got Warpath through my daughter's university library and it was a great help.

    AB64 - your hunch about the wrong dates in the Teepee Tabloid paid off. It was indeed Sgt. Campbell who, with his men, brought back the bodies of Asplund and the others killed in Waalwijk. That was the final piece in the puzzle and Warpath confirmed it.

    Thank you all for the help you gave me on this journey!

    Rachel
     
  8. klambie

    klambie Senior Member

    Rachel,

    Are you doing the Laurier teacher tour? Trip report on your return would be appreciated.
     
  9. rachel21mac

    rachel21mac Member

    No, not the Laurier Tour. This is through the University of New Brunswick's Gregg Centre. I did the Belgium/France tour with them in 2013 - fantastic! I'm very much looking forward to this.You can follow along here: http://warandthecanadianexperience.weebly.com/ and I'll be sure you give you a summary when I return.
     
    stolpi and canuck like this.
  10. Pronto91

    Pronto91 Member

    Hi everyone. I'm interested in learning about the circumstances surrounding the death of Lt Burslem who died on 12 April 1945. He was Royal Canadian Corps of Signals and attached to the Algonquin Regiment. Any chance there is information in the War Diaries? Images or information welcome!

    Thanks,
    Joe
     
  11. dryan67

    dryan67 Senior Member

    Here are the war diary pages for April 12th, 1945 that details the death of Lt Burslem.
     

    Attached Files:

    canuck and stolpi like this.
  12. dryan67

    dryan67 Senior Member

    He is mentioned in a memorial program held in Holland on June 10th, 1945.
     

    Attached Files:

    • 03.jpg
      03.jpg
      File size:
      167.1 KB
      Views:
      19
    • 04.jpg
      04.jpg
      File size:
      164.2 KB
      Views:
      17
    • 05.jpg
      05.jpg
      File size:
      135.3 KB
      Views:
      19
    • 06.jpg
      06.jpg
      File size:
      141.7 KB
      Views:
      18
    • 07.jpg
      07.jpg
      File size:
      138.5 KB
      Views:
      16
    • 08.jpg
      08.jpg
      File size:
      146.8 KB
      Views:
      15
    • 09.jpg
      09.jpg
      File size:
      145.7 KB
      Views:
      15
    • 10.jpg
      10.jpg
      File size:
      121.5 KB
      Views:
      15
    canuck and stolpi like this.
  13. Pronto91

    Pronto91 Member

    Wow dryan67, perfect and fast! Thanks!!!
     
  14. dryan67

    dryan67 Senior Member

    No problem. I am glad that I could be of some help.
     
  15. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    From Warpath, page 306;

    "The swift advance on such a wide frontage had of necessity left many areas uncleared.Skulkers were everywhere, and even at times fairly large formed bodies of troops. It was not at all unusual to hear shots in the darkness long after the "front" had passed on, and even of planned counter-attacks such as occurred at Sogel, where a medical detachment and an engineer section were struck one night. Our saddest experience of this nature occurred when Lt. A. M. Burslem, M.C., our Signals Officer, and one of the finest, most liked men in the unit, was ambushed and killed while driving his jeep from one company area to another. It was a severe blow to the battalion. "Burs" had run his signals platoon in such a fine, cooperative manner that we all felt we had the best communications it was possible to have. His men loved him; he would often be found relieving one of his fatigued lads and laying in a line himself. He had never, to our knowledge, taken any rest himself until all communications were in and functioning. The manner of his death aroused the greatest resentment in the regiment, Lt.-Col. Bradburn being particularly angry. As for the signallers, from then on it was hard to keep them at their proper work - they wanted to fire weapons, lots of them, instead of manning wireless sets. Chief among the mourners was Cpl. Ruddy, who drove the jeep, and was wounded, but managed to crawl away."

    High praise!
    No doubt it is men like this who the veterans recall when they honour their lost comrades.
     
    stolpi likes this.
  16. Pronto91

    Pronto91 Member

    Thanks Canuk!
     
  17. zeemacht

    zeemacht New Member

    Hello all,

    I'm new here and hoping that someone will help me out on my question about the Algonquin Regiment during operation Switchback(Holland)

    I am looking for a part of the WWII War Diary of the Algonquin Regiment (4th Can. A. Div.) for the period september 18th 1944 - september 29th 1944.
    It all has to do with my search for private Butwell who served with the D company 17 th. Platoon, it would be nice if someone can help me with this part of the diary.

    Looking forward to your replies.

    Frank Dumez
    fdumez@zeelandnet.nl






    • [​IMG]
    • [​IMG]
    • 0


     
  18. dryan67

    dryan67 Senior Member

    zeemacht:

    PM me with your email and I will provided you with a link to download the Algonquin Regiment War Diaries for July to September 1944.
     
  19. christinal

    christinal New Member

    I am new to the site and hoping for war diary entry of the Algonquin regiment either on or slightly before October 25 1944. I have a copy of Warpath and it states Pte. Norman L. Brown died of his wounds that day but we (his family) thought he was killed outright in action. Thanks for any help you can provide.
     
  20. dryan67

    dryan67 Senior Member

    Here are the war diary entries from October 21-25, 1944. I do not see a mention of Pte. Brown, though.
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page