... (title deleted by Stolpi)

Discussion in 'NW Europe' started by stolpi, Jul 1, 2012.

  1. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    55 Field Regiment Royal Artillery
    [​IMG]
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  2. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    Battle for Bemmel (6): 9th Bn Durham Light Infantry, 151st Infantry Brigade – 4 October 1944.

    The 9DLI were given the task of taking the village of Baal and surrounding orchards (see maps at Message # 93).

    NB. The trace map should be viewed to follow the attack and dispositions.

    They were to be supported by Divisional troops:
    Artillery - 74th Field Regiment, RA
    One 6-Pdr Troop, 289 Bty, 102nd Bn (Northumberland Hussars) Anti-Tank Regiment
    One Section, 505 Field Coy, RE
    One MG Platoon, ‘A’ Coy, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment
    12 Heavy Mortar Platoon, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment

    Under command:
    Two troops of tanks – 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards, 8th Armoured Brigade

    NB. The 8th Armoured Brigade had been part of 50th (Northumbrian) Division for the purposes of the D-Day landings and for a lot of the early fighting in Normandy.

    Also on call were:
    Five Field and Three Medium Regiments, RA (some Divisional Troops)
    ‘B’ Coy, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment (Divisional Troops)
    Two Platoons, 90 Coy, RASC
    ‘B’ Coy, 149 Field Ambulance (Divisional Troops)

    Lt-Col. Mogg divided the attack into two phases:

    1) ‘D’ Coy (Gin) on the right and ‘C’ Coy (Whisky) on the left were to advance to the road fork on the Bemmel-Baal road and the orchard running north west from Mariendaal, respectively. Both companies were to cross the start line at zero-hour = 14.00 hours.

    2) ‘A’ Coy (Rum) was to come up behind ‘D’ Coy and capture the orchard south of Baal. ‘B’ Coy (Beer) was to pass through ‘C’ Coy and capture Baal itself. Both companies were to cross the start line at zero-hour + 18 on orders from Lt-Col. Mogg.

    The battalion Carriers were to act as mobile reserve.

    The forming up areas were in orchards north of Bemmel.

    The planned rate of advance was 100 yards in 3 minutes, with the supporting artillery of 74th Field Regiment firing HE and smoke on the objectives as the battalion advanced. The tanks of the 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards were to shoot the infantry onto their objectives and when secured, move onto the objectives themselves to consolidate the gains. The 12 Heavy Mortar Platoon, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment were to pour fire onto road and track junctions, and orchards. The remainder of ‘A’ and the whole of ‘B’ Coy, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment, were to provide harassing MG fire.

    The 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry, who were currently attached to 151st Brigade from the 52nd (Lowland) Division, were to lift mines on request from the 9th Bn Durham Light Infantry.

    Both ‘D’ and ‘C’ Coy crossed the start line on time at 14.00 hours.

    ‘D’ Coy kept up with artillery barrage and quickly reached its objective, taking 40 prisoners.

    ‘C’ Coy were held up by the enemy holding the long ditch running south east from Houtakker and needed artillery support to blast the enemy out, which was successful, before going on to take its objective.

    Both ‘D’ and ‘C’ Coy’s were on their objectives by 14.45 hours.

    The enemy was now very alert to the attack and ‘A’ and ‘B’ Coys had to fight hard to take their objectives.

    ‘A’ Coy (on the right) tried to move around the left flank of ‘D’ Coy and ran into heavy MG fire from a house and orchards. Heavy casualties were suffered, including the CO, ‘A’ Coy, Captain JHW Hudson (wounded) and all three Platoon commanders (killed). Captain PWB Thompson now assumed command of ‘A’ Coy and not to be deterred, he rallied the remnants of the company and swung, now, to the right of ‘D’ Coy and with the help of a Troop of tanks of the 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards, took the objective.

    ‘B’ Coy (on the left) fought its way into Baal and took its objective, in the process knocking out two half tracks; one towing a 75mm Anti-tank gun.

    All companies reported that they were on their objectives by 16.50 hours. Casualties were reported as 60 in total, with the aforementioned 3 Platoon commanders of ‘A’ Coy and 12 Other Ranks killed. Circa 100 prisoners were taken, mainly from 21st SS Panzer Grenadiers.

    The 9th Bn Durham Light Infantry’s dispositions were very strong, with all Coy’s close together and in depth, with ‘D’ Coy in reserve. ‘A’ Coy, who were about half strength, were tied in with ‘B’ Coy and the left flank of the 8th Bn Durham Light Infantry. Vigorous patrolling gave the Durham’s complete control of area and a great view of the open, flat land between the now captured orchards and the Wettering Canal. By the days close it was reported that the enemy had withdrawn to the line of the Wettering Canal – which was the overall aim of the attack – and were unlikely to be able to counter-attack.

    Principal sources:

    The Gateshead Gurkhas (A History Of The 9th Bn The Durham Light Infantry 1859-1967) (Harry Moses)
    The War Diaries of the 6th, 8th and 9th Bns Durham Light Infantry and 151st Infantry Brigade – all Fifty Div
    Various and much appreciated assistance of Pieter (handle ‘stolpi’)
     
  3. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

  4. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    Lt. Brewer of the 9th Bn Durham Light Infantry's Anti-Tank Platoon described the scene after the objectives were gained.

    "When I took the remaining four guns up, the route was strewn with debris, wood from the numerous trees, ripped apart by shelling, an occasional cow or horse in the same condition (Ugh, how they stank!) and bits of buildings. There were also quite a few houses on fire and any amount of Jerry dead and wounded about the place. The infantry were busy digging themselves in and looking after their prisoners, of whom they had quite a haul... I took a couple of guns belonging to the Northumberland Hussars up with me... Mostly all went well and the digging in was soon underway. The exception was the gun on the left flank - I'd only just sited that when an A/P shell cut straight through one of the trail legs, making it a dangerous proposition to fire like that."

    Source: The Gateshead Gurkhas - A History Of The 9th Battalion The Durham Light Infantry 1859 - 1967 (Harry Moses)
     
  5. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    A search on Geoff’s Search Engine reveals the following men of the 9th Bn Durham Light Infantry killed on 4 October 1944, including the three ‘A’ Coy Platoon Commanders killed in the initial left hook around ‘D’ Coy: Capt Birchwood, Lt. Sutherland and Lt. Taylor. You will note that there are 14 (not 12) men listed, which differs slightly from the Battalion War Diary returns. One of the additional men appears to be Pte EJ Trodd (RAMC).

    001 CHARLTON RA 4277032 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    002 DRANSFIELD W 3913251 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    003 FOSTER MJ 14696554 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    004 GILLESPIE G 14530694 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    005 HOBSON A 4542256 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    006 MCMANMON D 2390858 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    007 ROBERTS J 14403257 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    008 ROBINS SG 14579873 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    009 ROWLAND S 4618859 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    010 RUSSELL CJ 1830028 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    011 STEADMAN JA 14306211 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    012 THOMPSON J 14615400 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    013 THOMPSTONE J 14669154 9TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY

    004 TRODD EJ 14597453 ATTD 9TH BN 04/10/1944 ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL

    001 SUTHERLAND JWF 303020 - 04/10/1944 ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS
    002 BIRCHWOOD J 289948 - 04/10/1944 EAST LANCASHIRE REGIMENT
    003 TAYLOR HN 269239 ATTD 04/10/1944 ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS
     
  6. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    Battle for Bemmel (7): 8th Bn Durham Light Infantry, 151st Infantry Brigade – 4 October 1944.

    The 8DLI were given the task of taking the ground and orchards between the 9DLI’s objectives and Haalderen (see maps at Messages # 93 and 104). If the 8DLI were on objective at the end of the attack, the right of their positions were to be used as the start line for the intended attack on Haalderen by the 6th Bn Higland Light Infantry (under command of 151st Infantry Brigade).

    They were to be supported by Divisional troops:
    Artillery - 74th Field Regiment, RA
    One M10 Troop, 289 Bty, 102nd Bn (Northumberland Hussars) Anti-Tank Regiment
    One Section, 505 Field Coy, RE
    One MG Platoon, ‘A’ Coy, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment
    13 Heavy Mortar Platoon, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment

    Under command:
    Two troops of tanks – 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards, 8th Armoured Brigade

    Also on call were:
    Five Field and Three Medium Regiments, RA (some Divisional Troops)
    ‘B’ Coy, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment (Divisional Troops)
    Two Platoons, 90 Coy, RASC
    ‘B’ Coy, 149 Field Ambulance (Divisional Troops)

    Lt-Col. Oldman decided to attack with ‘A’ Coy on the right and ‘C’ Coy on the left; with ‘B’ and ‘D’ Coys as respective reserves.

    The battalion Carrier and Anti-Tank Platoons were to be called up when the rifle companies were on their objectives.

    The planned rate of advance was 100 yards in 5 minutes, with the supporting artillery of 74th Field Regiment firing HE and smoke on the objectives as the battalion advanced, and smoke near the factory at 7465, an enemy strong point, to impair the enemy view of the advancing troops. The tanks of the 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards were to support the advance. The 13 Heavy Mortar Platoon, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment were to pour fire onto road and track junctions, and orchards. The remainder of ‘A’ and the whole of ‘B’ Coy, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment, were to provide harassing MG fire.

    The 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry, who were currently attached to 151st Brigade from the 52nd (Lowland) Division, were to lift mines on request from the 8th Bn Durham Light Infantry.

    Both ‘A’ and ‘C’ Coy crossed the start line on time at 14.00 hours, moving in extended order over ground that had been cultivated and on through the numerous orchards.

    RAF Typhoons made an appearance attacking the factory at 7465, the aim being to prevent the advancing troops coming under enfilade fire from the right flank. The Typhoons made a deafening noise as they flew in low to attack the factory, their rockets making a terrifying screech as they were fired towards their target.

    ‘A’ Coy kept up with artillery barrage and quickly dealt with all opposition and took its objective.

    ‘C’ Coy did not do so well. It had very few experienced men left and faltered under enemy fire in the area 749674, suffering several casualties. ‘D’ Coy was ordered to move up and take over ‘C’ Coy’s responsibilities. This was an unenviable task as the British artillery barrage behind which the attacking troops were advancing was now well ahead. However, ‘D’ Coy advanced quickly and took its objective.

    ‘D’ Coy reported that it was on its objective (753675) by 16.25 hours, ‘A’ Coy (756673) by 16.45 hours; the latter reported enemy tanks moving about to their front.

    Casualties were reported as 10 killed including Lt Robertson of ‘C’ Coy and 40 wounded, including Lt Frith. Circa 60 prisoners were taken and 20 enemy soldiers were reported dead, mainly from 21st SS Panzer Grenadiers.

    As with the 9DLI, vigorous patrolling gave the Durham’s complete control of area and a great view of the open, flat land between the orchards and the Wettering Canal. By the days close it was reported that the enemy had withdrawn to the line of the Wettering Canal – which was the overall aim of the attack – and were unlikely to be able to counter-attack.

    The 8DLI also patrolled the area in front of Haalderen, gathering intelligence on enemy dispositions in preparation for the intended action by 6HLI.

    Principal sources:

    8th Battalion The Durham Light Infantry 1939 - 1945 (Maj PJ Lewis and Maj IR English)
    The War Diaries of the 6th, 8th and 9th Bns Durham Light Infantry and 151st Infantry Brigade – all 50th (Northumbrian) Division
    Various and much appreciated assistance of Pieter (handle ‘stolpi’)
     
  7. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

  8. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    A search on Geoff’s Search Engine reveals the following men of the 8th Bn Durham Light Infantry killed on 4 October 1944, including Lt Robertson of ‘C’ Coy.

    001 BISHOP IC 5435838 8TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    002 BLACKMAN EE 5493059 8TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    003 BUTLER M 4270559 8TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    004 CALVERT WM 4470279 8TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    005 DENT RH 4470045 8TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    006 KIRTON S 5248277 8TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    007 NOLAND HA 5260563 8TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    008 OGDEN F 4455749 8TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY
    009 PARSONS AA 14642739 8TH BN 04/10/1944 DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY

    002 ROBERTSON N 268114 ATTD 04/10/1944 ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS
     
  9. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    At around 22.00 hours it was reported that Major Riley, CO ‘B’ Coy, had been killed when an enemy shell exploded just outside his HQ.

    001 RILEY CA 53496 7TH BN 04/10/1944 EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

    The only other member of the Division that I have identified as killed on 4 October 1944 is:

    001 HOWE L 4134174 2ND BN 04/10/1944 CHESHIRE REGIMENT

    The regimental history does not mention if Corporal Howe was in ‘A’ or ‘B’ Coy and so involved in this action, or another Coy of the 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment.

    Units under command or supporting 151st Infantry Brigade, that were not Divisional units, have not yet been reviewed.
     
  10. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

  11. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    Battle for Bemmel (8): 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry, 157th Infantry Brigade – 4 October 1944.

    The 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry was attached to 151st Infantry Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division at 11.30 hours on 2 October 1944, for the purpose of capturing Haalderen (Message # 107 previously refers).

    Preamble about the 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry:

    The 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry, was at this time brigaded with the 1st Bn Glasgow Highlanders and 5th Bn Highland Light Infantry, in 157th Infantry Brigade, 52nd (Lowland) Division.

    To date, the 52nd (Lowland) Division had had what I will describe as a ‘strange’ war, as it had never been utilised in any of the roles it had trained for. For example:

    · In June 1940 it was shipped to France as part of the Second BEF, but only to cover the withdrawal of forces near Cherbourg during Operation Ariel;
    · From May 1942 until June 1944 it trained in mountain warfare, but was never deployed in this role;
    · From July 1944 it was reorganised and trained in air-landing operations. As part of this new role the division was transferred to the First Allied Airborne Army. Several air-landing operations were planned for the division, none of which occurred; and
    · As part of Operation Market Garden the 1st Airborne Division was given a subsidiary mission of capturing Deelen airfield, on which the 52nd (Lowland) Division would land. Due to the course of events that unfolded during the Battle of Arnhem it was not so deployed.

    And so it was by further strange quirks of fate that the 157th Infantry Brigade was transferred to Belgium via a sea landing at Ostend and then the 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry, of 157th Infantry Brigade, was to spend its first day in the front line (1st October 1944) as ordinary ‘Infantry’ in Fifty Div, a division that had seen more fighting in WWII than any other British Infantry division.
     
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  12. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    (Page 2) The 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry (6HLI) were earmarked to participate in the final phase of the Fifty Div attack between Baal and Haalderen, namely, the capture of Haalderen (7566). The attack was scheduled for 5 October 1944, H-Hour not to be before 06.00 hours. See maps at Messages # 93, 104 and 112.

    The 6HLI’s task was to pass through the 8DLI’s newly won positions and capture the area from road junction 760663 and orchards at 764670. It was decided to attack with ‘C’ Coy on the right and ‘D’ Coy on the left; with ‘B’ and ‘A’ Coys in reserve; the latter to organise PIAT parties for clearing houses of snipers.

    They were to be supported by Divisional troops:
    One 6-Pdr Troop, 289 Bty, 102nd Bn (Northumberland Hussars) Anti-Tank Regiment
    One MG Platoon, ‘A’ Coy, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regiment

    Also on call were:
    Six Field and Three Medium Regiments, RA (some Divisional Troops) and other support, similar to that available to the 8 and 9DLI the previous day.

    At 21.00 hours on 4 October 1944 news was received that the attack was postponed by 24 hours i.e. until 6 October 1944.

    At first light on the 5 October 1944 information was collated from the night patrols:
    · 9DLI – noise of tracked vehicle heard east on the Wettering canal, but it was thought the enemy had withdrawn completely over the canal in this sector;
    · 8DLI – reported enemy digging-in in Haalderen;
    · 6DLI – reported factory at 745660 now vacated by enemy, following attack by RAF Typhoons the previous day.

    Enemy maps captured by 8DLI showed plans for an enemy withdrawal behind the Neder Rijn. In addition, during the day Dutch civilian reports suggested that the enemy had also now withdrawn from Haalderen.

    Following a 151st Infantry Brigade Conference, given the general situation on the Durham’s front, it was decided to, instead, now occupy the 6HLI’s objectives - which included the factories at 745661 and 757662 - by fighting patrols during the night of the 5/6 October 1944 and then commence a build-up, so that the whole battalion was on objective by first light (code word ‘Kangaroo’). If this plan failed a full scale attack (code word ‘Elephant’) with supporting arms would take place, commencing at 7.35 hours on 6 October 1944; 151st Infantry Brigade Operational Order No. 113 refers.

    At 20.00 hours on 5 October 1944, 6HLI sent off three very strong fighting patrols. By 20.55 hours two of these patrols had reported that they were on objective. The other was out of wireless touch, but was reported on objective by 01.35 hours on 6 October.

    One of the patrols at 760664 was attacked by the enemy and ‘C’ Coy was sent ahead to assist. The remainder of the battalion moved forward at 04.00 hours. ‘B’ and ‘D’ Coys were on their objectives at first light and ‘C’ and ‘A’ Coys were fighting on their objectives, both being hindered by MG and sniper fire. At 12.30 hours a Troop of tanks and a Platoon of ‘A’ Coy were sent out to clear houses of the offending enemy and by 14.30 hour ‘A’ Coy was completely on objective. ‘C’ Coy was unable to get completely on objective and at 14.15 hours one Platoon of ‘B’ Coy was moved in behind them to assist.

    'D' Coy, 6th Bn Durham Light Infantry was put under command of 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry at 16.00 hours and moved into Haalderen near the factory in area 757668.

    ‘A’ Coy were now being continuously and heavily mortared, and so at 18.30 hours they were moved further forward to 759665, with ‘B’ Coy, 6th Bn Durham Light Infantry taking over ‘A’ Coy’s vacated positions at 757668. Further local moves took place in order to strengthen the 6HLI’s gains.

    Thereafter, patrols were sent out, but no enemy were seen or heard and the night of 6 October 1944 was quiet.

    Principal sources:

    The War Diaries of the 6th Highland Light Infantry, 6th Bn Durham Light Infantry and 151st Infantry Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division
    Various and much appreciated assistance of Pieter (handle ‘stolpi’)
     
  13. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    A search on Geoff’s Search Engine reveals the following men of the 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry killed or died of wounds between the 1 and 7 October 1944, when they were successively attached to 69th, 231st and 151st Infantry Brigades; all of Fifty Div. Those killed include Lt. AJ Stevenson, HQ Coy. The Roll agrees exactly with the War Diary; the latter is a real work of art with disembarkation lists, roll of wounded and where they were evacuated to, etc.

    001 ADAMS D 3316025 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    002 BASTIN VH 3321012 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    003 BIBBY F 3326253 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    004 BRYCE G 14540673 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    005 BURBIDGE TR 14607446 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    006 BURKE J 3328328 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    007 CHRISTIE W 3307332 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    008 DAVIDSON J 3327983 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    009 DOWLING J 3317651 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    010 FOSTER F 3328281 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    011 GARDNER JR 14678380 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    012 HALL M 3320586 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    013 HAYES J 3313999 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    014 HORTON AM 14678106 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    015 HUNT W 14696990 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    016 LAYTON J 3319915 6TH BN 01/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    017 MARTIN K 14717642 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    018 MCAVOY J 3328445 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    019 MCGLADE JR 3328455 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    020 MCLEAN J 14717893 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    021 MCPARTLAND RS 2767204 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (C OF G REGT)
    022 ORROCK A 3311650 6TH BN 07/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    023 PHILLIPS AM 3324717 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    024 PRITCHARD E 14212325 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    025 ROSS G 2751251 6TH BN 06/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    026 STEVENSON AJ 204356 6TH BN 07/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    027 WILKINSON J 2567915 6TH BN 01/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    028 WINN JH 4271967 6TH BN 07/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)
    029 WOOD A 3319936 6TH BN 04/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)

    Notes regarding the foregoing:

    In the Part II orders up to 20 October 1944 the following men were listed as missing:

    Pte D Adams – Missing believed wounded believed PoW
    Pte T Burbridge - Missing believed PoW
    Pte J Gardner - Missing believed PoW
    Pte K Martin – Missing believed killed
    Pte A Orrock - Missing believed PoW
    Pte E Pritchard - Missing known to be wounded believed PoW
    W/CSM G Ross - Missing known to be wounded believed PoW

    and

    Sgt M Hall – Wounded, evacuated to 149 Field Ambulance on 4 October 1944. Died of wounds on 6 October 1944.

    In addition, Sgt Lowes died of wounds received in action on 6 October 1944:

    002 LOWES E 3320592 6TH BN 08/10/1944 HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY (CITY OF GLASGOW REGIMENT)

    Sgt E Lowes – Wounded, evacuated to 149 Field Ambulance on 6 October 1944. Died of wounds on 8 October 1944.
     
  14. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    Men Killed in Action/Died of Wounds = 30: - (as per Message # 115 above)

    ‘A’ Coy killed - Bibby, Bryce, Davidson, Foster, Gardner, Layton, Lowes, Phillips, Ross, Winn.
    ‘B’ Coy killed – Christie.
    ‘C’ Coy killed – Dowling, Hayes, Horton, Hunt, McAvoy, McLean.
    ‘D’ Coy killed – Adams, Burbridge, Martin, McGlade, McPartland, Orrock.
    ‘HQ/S’ Coy killed – Bastin, Burke, Hall, Pritchard, Stevenson, Wilkinson, Wood.

    Wounded in action = 58:

    1 October 1944 = 12
    2 October 1944 = 04
    3 October 1944 = 01
    4 October 1944 = 04
    5 October 1944 = 03
    6 October 1944 = 26 - including Lt. E Fjaerli ‘C’ Coy – a Norwegian Officer.
    7 October 1944 = 08

    Missing in action at Haalderen 6 October 1944 (as at 17 October 1944) = 35: - all believed PoW

    Hospital Admissions 6 October 1944 – not battle related = 17: – usually negligible

    Battle Exhaustion Cases 6 October 1944 = 19: - including one Officer.
     
  15. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

  16. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    Steve - the number of 35 MIA's of 6 October IMO is an unusual high one. What happened, that so many men were reported missing (or do I not read it correctly?).

    Hello Pieter,

    I agree, but it is all there in black & white in the War Diary and the Adjutant is very precise; the information he has recorded is amazing.

    The 30 KIA/DoW is also high compared to the Fifty Div formations:
    * 1st Hampshires = 15
    * 1st Dorsets = 12
    * 9th DLI = 17
    * 8th DLI = 11

    But it must be remembered that:
    * Only 23 of the aforementioned 30 were killed on 6 October; and
    * This was the 6HLI's first real battle in WWII - they were green.

    It is then maybe not so surprising that they had 35 MIA's.

    I will check to see if there is any later 'returns' - later than 17 October 1944 - of missing men filtering back and being 'taken on strength' again.

    Best,

    Steve.
     
  17. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

  18. horsapassenger

    horsapassenger Senior Member

    Steve - the number of 35 MIA's of 6 October IMO is an unusual high one. What happened, that so many men were reported missing (or am I not reading correctly?).

    Pieter

    II attach the list of "Missing" from 6th October posted in Battalion Orders on the 10th October on which I count 41 names. The list of those Killed or wounded for that day is much longer

    John
     

    Attached Files:

    stolpi likes this.
  19. horsapassenger

    horsapassenger Senior Member

    Pieter

    A bit more information about the casualties of the 6th October

    John
     

    Attached Files:

  20. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    'Only' five are still listed as MIA and mentioned on the Groesbeek Memorial: Adams, Burbridge, Burke, Gardner and Martin.

    Three of the MIA's (mentioned in # 116) were later registered as KIA Orrocks, Pritchard and Ross. That makes 35 - 8 = 27 still unaccounted for.

    Horsapassenger might help out in this matter.

    Pieter

    II attach the list of "Missing" from 6th October posted in Battalion Orders on the 10th October on which I count 41 names. The list of those Killed or wounded for that day is much longer

    John

    Pieter

    A bit more information about the casualties of the 6th October

    John

    Hello Pieter/John,

    I collated all of the information to be found in the Part II Orders No. 146 to 153 and separately the Battalion Orders No. 11/44 to 16/44, i.e. the ones that covered the 1 to 7 October 1944 in some way, and then cross-checked them. That includes all the pages from the War Diaries you just posted.

    The list of 35 already excludes those that the CWGC (and the War Diary itself) later show KIA/DoW, etc. – it is a net figure.

    It would be easy to have made a mistake, but only one or two perhaps.

    I thought that, compared to the KIAs, the WIA numbers were low. It may be that some of the MIAs were initially reported as such when they had in fact been evacuated wounded. Despite the Adjutants best efforts, given that 149th Field Ambulance were divisional troops of Fifty Div and 6HLI left Fifty Div on 7 October 1944, it could be that reports about wounded men did not filter through to 6HLI for a while. It is worth investigating further and I will be in touch by PM to discuss how we progress this…

    Best,

    Steve.

    Edit II: The number of MIA is confirmed as 35 'Other Ranks'. However, it now transpires that at least 2 of the 3 further men shown MIA in Battalion Orders No. 15/44 of 10 October 1944 (but not shown in the Part II Orders No. 152 or 153 of the 17 and 20 October 1944 respectively) and assumed returned to strength, were in fact Officers taken PoW - Capt. Hannigan and Lt. Rae; see Message # 125 following.
     

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