The Royal Corps of Signals

Discussion in 'Royal Signals' started by Drew5233, May 25, 2009.

  1. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    A Unit History

    I thought I’d start a thread with some of my old Corps details like how it was formed and some lesser known facts so it can be a place to post all The Royal Corps of Signals stuff from the Second World War. (Thanks for the idea Diane).

    The Royal Corps of Signals was officially come to be on 28th June 1920 and was known as Corps of Signals. The Royal Warrant for its creation was signed by the Secretary of State for War, then Winston Churchill. The Corps of Signals received the title ‘Royal Corps of Signals’ six weeks later by King George V.

    The Royal Corps history can be traced back way before 1920. Communication on the battlefield has always played a major part in the success or failure in a battle and was used at great lengths by the Greek and Roman armies by way of Torch and Water Telegraphs and coloured smoke. In England during the 16th century beacons were used and in 1796 the Admiralty used what was known as the ‘Murray Lettering Telegraph’. ‘Morse Code’ was used for the first time during the Crimean War and due to more and more demand and the slow advances in technology a Signal Wing was formed by the Royal Engineers at Chatham in 1867. In 1870 ‘C’ Telegraph Troop was formed by Captain Montague Lambert. The troop was the first professional unit of what are now known as Signallers in the British Army. The unit’s role was to provide communications for the army on the battlefield. This was achieved by visual signals, horse mounted signallers and telegraph. On 1st May 1884 ‘C’ Troop was amalgamated with the 22nd and 34th Companies, Royal Engineers to form the Telegraph Battalion, Royal Engineers. In these short four years the unit had steadily grown in numbers and had seen service in the Abyssinian War, the Anglo-Zulu war and the Nile Campaign. It would be fair to say that the battalion’s first role of not was during the Ashanti Campaign, 1895-1896. During this campaign men of the Telegraph Battalion cut a path for a overhead line from Cape Coast to Prashu covering some 72 miles through jungle. When men of the Telegraph Battalion completed the task and stumbled out of the jungle they were confronted by King Prempeh who was so surprised by their actions he offered the surrender of his Army to them. King Prempeh’s throne can be seen today in The Royal Corps of Signals Museum at Blandford, Dorset.

    Signalling in the British Army remained the responsibility of the Telegraph Battalion until 1908 when the Royal Engineers Signal Service was formed. This unit provided communications throughout The First World War and it was during this war that motorcycle despatch riders and wireless radio sets were used for the first time. The Royal Corps of Signals nickname ‘Scalie/Scaley backs’ came about during the First World War to. It comes from the battery acid burns that were found on the back of the Engineers who carried the batteries up to the front line trenches for use with the radios that often leaked the acid down their backs. Wireless communications were used in various campaigns including France, Flanders, Salonika, Palestine and Mesopotamia.

    The agreement to form the Signal Corps was first officially recognised just before the end of World War One in 1918. Due to government delays and the like this was delayed until 1920.


    Before the outbreak of the Second World War recruits were required to be a minimum of 5 feet 2 inches tall, all recruits were taught to ride horses and did their signal training at Catterick, North Yorkshire where the Corps stayed for many years until moving to Bladford, Dorset in 1993. From the Corps being formed up to the outbreak of World War Two the Corps had members serving all over the world from Shanghai to Jamaica. The majority of the Corps was stationed overseas with around a third stationed in India. As with every military campaign since World War Two the Royal Corps of Signals could be found in every major battle in World War Two and at the end of the war the Corps had a strength of 8,518 officers and 142,472 soldiers.

    On Wednesday 17th September 1941 The War Office announced that the wearing of Royal Signals shoulder titles on battledress for troops serving at home will be discontinued.

    One of the Corps most talked about moments during World War Two was when Corporal Thomas Waters of 5th Parachute Brigade Signal Section was awarded the Military Medal for laying and maintaining the field telephone line under heavy enemy fire across the Caen Canal Bridge on D Day 1944. This is remembered in one of the many officail Corps paintings called ‘Go to it’.

    After the war most of the Corps was deployed to Germany (BOAR) to counter the threat of the ‘Cold War’. However throughout this time you could find members of the Corps on active service in Palestine, Malaya, Korea, Suez Canal Zone, Cyprus, Borneo, Aden, the Arabian Peninsula, Kenya, Namibia, Kurdistan, Cambodia, Rwanda, Angola Zaire and Belize. In more recent time the Corps provided communications during the Falklands Campaign, Northern Ireland, the First Gulf War, Croatia, Bosnia, Kosovo, Sierra Leone, East Timor and the Second Gulf War. Another first for the British Army was handed to the Corps in 2001 when they were the first to form a unit, namely 97 Signal Squadron to provide all the communications for the British Army in Bosnia made up completely from members of the Territorial Army. The Squadron was commanded by the then Major Andrew Smith and was awarded a MBE. He was my OC and CO.

    The Royal Corps of Signals can be found on operations today in Cyprus, Bosnia/Kosovo, Iraq and Afghanistan amongst others at the time of posting.

    Tactical Recognition Flash, TRF: Blue and White.

    Cap Badge: The Corps cap badge features Mercury, the winged messenger of the Roman gods, who is lovingly known as ‘Jimmy’ by members of the Corps. There are several theories where the name originates from but the most common and likely is the name Jimmy comes from is a Royal Signals boxer, called Jimmy Emblem, who was the British Army Champion in 1924 and represented the Royal Corps of Signals from 1921 to 1924. Jimmy Somerville (Communards fame) could have been another theory but he joined the Corps far too late for it to be linked with him.

    Motto: The Corps motto is Certa Cito, which translates to Swift and Sure.

    Lanyard: The Corps wears a dark blue lanyard on dress uniforms signifying its early links with the Royal Engineers.

    Appointments: The Colonel in Chief is currently HRH The Princess Royal.

    Corps Colours: Green, Sea Blue, Sky Blue. Signifying the Corps provides communications on Land, Sea and Air.

    The Royal Corps of Signals is the only unit in the British Army to have ‘The’ Royal Corps in its title and The Royal Corps is the only unit to have a separate Airborne and Special Forces Squadron, namely 216 Signal Squadron and 264 Signal Squadron.

    All the above Infomation is from my recruiting memory, The MOD and Wikipedia with no cut and pasting.

    [​IMG]
    The Royal Corps of Signals Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum.

    Please Post anything to do with The Royal Corps of Signals during World War Two below.
     
    Sgt Bilko and dbf like this.
  2. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    One of the Corps most Celebrated soldiers.

    Awarded the Military Medal 6th June 1944.

    Citation Reads:

    For conspicuous gallantry and coolness under enemy fire and devotion to duty during airborne operations in the Ranville area on 6th/7th June 1944. On 6th June Corporal Waters volunteered to bring in a wounded comrade from an exposed position, in the face of accurate enemy sniping which had already caused casualties he coolly went forward and brought in the wounded man. He then continued his duty of laying a signal line along an exposed route under constant enemy sniping and small arms fire. When this line was cut by enemy fire Corporal Waters again went out under fire and repaired it. [On several] occasions this NCO went out voluntarily and repaired communications in full view of the enemy. By his gallantry and complete disregard of personal danger Corporal Waters maintained communications between Brigade Headquarters and a Battalion holding a vital position.


    [​IMG]

    Further reading :
    Corporal Thomas Waters
     
    brithm likes this.
  3. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter 1940 Obsessive

    'Catterick' - there's a name to make ex-signalmen shudder !

    Don't forget Air Formation Signals and the part they played in close air support which was so vital to success in Normandy.

    I'll be interested to see how this thread develops.
     
  4. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Drew - excellent account of a great corps

    Cheers
     
  5. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    From The Times, Saturday, June 22, 1940
    ARMY AWARDS

    GALLANT MEMBERS OF THE B.E.F.
    BRAVERY IN REARGUARD ACTIONS

    MILITARY CROSS
    Sec. Lt. DAVID CLIFFORD JOHNSTON BELL, R. SIGNALS

    This officer was in command of a detachment of dispatch riders, and worked day and night for two weeks to keep communications open, often carrying important messages himself owing to the scarcity of dispatch riders. On May 20 he made several reconnaisances into the area where one of the brigades had been overrun by tanks, in order to establish communication with the scattered remnants of its battalions, and was largely responsible for collecting a large portion of the brigade. His energy and resource and total disregard of personal danger set a fine example to all ranks.


    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/details-result.asp?Edoc_Id=7652738&queryType=1&resultcount=4
    Name Bell, David Clifford Johnston
    Rank: Second Lieutenant
    Regiment: Royal Signals
    Theatre of Combat or Operation: British Expeditionary Force 1939-40
    Award: Military Cross
    Date of Announcement in London Gazette: 20 December 1940
    Date 1940-1942
    Catalogue reference WO 373/16

    18 August 1939
    http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/34656/pages/5679
    ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS.
    Spr. David Clifford Johnston BELL, from R.E., to be 2nd Lt. 16th Aug. 1939.
     
  6. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    From The Times, Monday, Apr 17, 1944
    GROUND COMMUNICATIONS FOR THE R.A.F.
    AIR FORMATION SIGNALS READY FOR INVASION

    As the first aircraft of the Allied Expeditionary Air Force prepare to land on territory won back from the enemy, a great organization will be working to set up a ground service that must be as efficient as their home bases. One section of this organization will have the important task of creating and maintaining the chain of ground communications.

    This work is undertaken by Air Formation Signals, units of the Royal Corps of Signals place at the disposal of the R.A.F., and they were on their uniforms a blue triangle with white border and white wings at the base.

    From the days of the withdrawal from France, Air Formation Signals have been sharpening and developing their organization for the return to the other side.
     
  7. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter 1940 Obsessive

    Diane, is there any way of telling which Divisional Signals he was attached to ? I'm always keen to pin down BEF motorcycle usage (which was of course considerable given the reliance on land-line communications which couldn't hope to keep up with the fluid situation in 1940).

    Rich
     
  8. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter 1940 Obsessive

    From The Times, Monday, Apr 17, 1944

    My Dad was 11 Air Formation Signals. A very small cog in a very large machine and as most messages were coded, with no broader a picture than anyone else.
     
  9. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    Diane, is there any way of telling which Divisional Signals he was attached to ? I'm always keen to pin down BEF motorcycle usage (which was of course considerable given the reliance on land-line communications which couldn't hope to keep up with the fluid situation in 1940).

    Rich

    Thought that might light your fire. :D
    Apart from the original citation itself ... the only other thing I can check is the Gazette and without a Regt No from TNA refs, so far I have only found one thing for him - edited next to citation.
    D
     
  10. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    From The Times, Thursday, September 4, 1941
    NERVE CENTRE OF A MODERN ARMY

    COMPLEX DUTIES OF THE ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    CARRIER PIGEON TO WIRELESS TELEPHONY

    FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT WITH THE ARMY
    The Royal Corps of Signals, at one time in its history a branch of the Royal Engineers, usually has the distinction of being taken for granted even in offical announcements about British regiments engaged, for example, in Crete or Syria. Yet every formation, down to and including the battalion, has its signal unit as distinct from the regimental signallers, and the development of military communications within the last two years had been very much a romance of science. The advance of short-wave wireless telephony alone has given the war machine an articulate form whose possibilities are constantly being discovered. As an instance of what can be done under the stress of events, there is the story from France of a forward observing officer of artillery who in his little wireless truck, moved up all day with the leading infantry, and by being able to talk back to his battery repeatedly brought down supporting fire in a matter of seconds.

    I have recently had an opportunity of studying the signalling system of an armoured division, which possesses the largest wireless lay-out of any unit; there is hardly a vehicle in it that does not carry one or more sets, and clearly a formation of such far-ranging mobility must sink or swim with its signals. Every movement, every order, is controlled by wireless, and though the sets in the tanks are operated by the crews themselves, the various squadrons of the Corps of Signals number nearly 800 men, and there is plenty for them to do.

    TIGER CALLING AJAX
    I went out with the chief signal officer to meet some of his units returning from an exercise, and miles away we picked them up on the little set in his car. "Tiger calling Ajax. Tiger calling Ajax," someone might be chanting. "We are moving into harbour. Tiger calling Ajax. Over." - and just as clearly Ajax would talk to Tiger. With so many people speaking at the same time within the division, and maybe from outside, it all calls for a delicate adjustment of frequencies and wireless discipline of a high order.

    A clear picture of the operation of an armoured division may be gained by a study of its signal squadrons, which being self-contained, drive and maintain their own vehicles. The headquarters squadron, for instance, links the commander and his staff with brigade headquarters, and provides communication with the air and with the superior formation, which in the event of operations would probably be an Army corps. Within the squadron, besides the operators, are a technical maintenance troop, a cable troop to provide any necessary land lines, and a troop of dipatch-riders. Other squadrons link up the sub-formations in the support group and operate with the armoured brigades, in which they provide the links between brigade headquarters and the regiments. In addition there is a small signal troop in each armoured regiment for the maintenance of sets and batteries, which would be restored at night after a battle.

    During operations divisional headquarters consists of several large bullet-proof trucks known as armoured command vehicles, in which all the staff work is done. There is also one of these vehicles in each brigade. They are maintained by the Signals, and so, incidentally, is the general's charger - a tank which, by name at least, preserves the cavalry tradition. Each of these command vehicles performs a different function, and they are all linked by their own wireless net - familiarly known as the "house telephone," over which the commander's orders and information from the brigades may be heard.

    AN ARMOURED OFFICE
    One command vehicle might control the net between the general and the brigades, another would work with the armoured car regiment, another with the air or with rear headquarters, and so on. The armoured command vehicle may be traced to a brigadier who, attempting to squeeze himself and his maps and his brigade majore into a tank on Salisbury Plain, said: "I must have an armoured office." That is what it is. The Signals, moreover, have to provide the "anchor" sets whenever an armoured division is attached to another formation. In working with the air, for example, they maintain two sets, carried in wireless trucks at the aerodrome.

    All this may give some idea of the complex and vital nature of the duties to-day of the Corps of Signals; and in France we had a crowning example of what happens when communications break down. The duties are not really so complicated as they look but clearly depend on finished training and on every man being a master of his task. There is no end of learning about the military uses of wireless, which are closely bound up with the question of security. Just when to impose wireless silences, and when and where to send messages in clear or in cipher are constant problems. Broadly, the preference is for radio telephony, by which messages may be transmitted rapidly and, by a plentiful sprinkling of code words, with little risk of being intercepted usefully by the enemy. Wireless sets, moreover, have improved so considerably that the speaker's voice may readily be recognized - another great advantage.

    Here range is the problem, especially in armoured divisions. A range of 70 miles when communicating with aircraft is quite general, but on land much depends on the nature of the country, and radio-telephony is notoriously most unreliable during the tactically important hours of dusk and dawn. Wireless telegraphy can then be used, but at once, given far greater ranges the problem of security becomes more urgent. Morse, for one thing, is an international code, and here the use made of enciphered messages is bound to increase. In general, it may be said that the number of persons authorized to use the radio telephone increases on the way down from the higher-commands. It is the other way round with cipher, which in any case is not used in fron of the division.

    CORPS HEADQUARTERS
    A visit to corps headquarters gave a similar picture of the ceaseless activity of the Signals staff, though naturally their system of communications was far less fluid. Three companies were engaged - on with cable-laying, the others with wireless and telegraphy on a far more permanent basis than would operate in the field. By laying many miles of underground cable and linking up at various points with the Post Office system, a network of communications had been built up on the grid principle, so that if one section of it were put out of action another way round could be found. Down in the cellars of an old mansion, working in anything but congenial conditions, was the staff of the Signal Office, with a modern telephone exchange, and their hive of teleprinters and telegraph transmitters. During a normal day more than 2,000 telephone calls pass through their switchboard, and the dispatch-rider letter service handles some hundreds of documents. A system of remote control, with land lines laid frmo the sets to house telephones, makes it possible for headquarters to have its wireless station in a safe position some miles away from the building. One link with the past that has been retained, apart from the old methods of visual signalling which are still taught, is the Army carrier pigeon service, which is also operated by the Corps of Signals against a day when all else fails.

    It has been learned by experience, sometimes costly experience, that information is a more vital need in swift-moving, modern warfare than ever before. The Corps of Signals are taking an increasing part in active reconnaissance. The new G.H.Q. Liason Regiment, whose functions as a link between the commander-in-chief and the battlefield have already been described in The Times, largely works through Signals men, who also have their units with battalions of the more recently created Reconnaissance Corps.

    I was able to visit one of these battalions, which are strong in Bren carriers and the armoured cars known as Beaverettes, and which generally operate on similar lines to the old divisional cavalry. This battalion was composed of officers and men from several regiments, in this case from units of a London Territorial division; but now the Reconnaissance Corps has adopted its own badge, designed by the way, by a private soldier. But a corps commander, apparently, has still to be appointed.
     
  11. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    From The Times, Saturday, Jun 15, 1940
    ARMY DECORATIONS

    The War Office issues the following list, showing Immediate Awards made by the Commander-in-Chief, B.E.F., in connexion with recent operations:-

    MILITARY CROSS
    Captain Herbert PICKARD, Royal Signals.

    Captain Pickard was in command of the Air Formation Signals which provided the ground communications of a Group. Without his tireless efforts in the face of the greatest difficulties and danger the Group would not have been able to operate after it left its original location. Several nights his reconnaissances were severely interrupted by enemy air action, which drove him to take cover for long periods and often severed his lines, which were at once repaired. By his example he inspired his men to remain at their posts until the enemy were within close range. Whenever the operational echelon of the Group had to move because of the approach of the enemy Captain Pickard had, by his initiative and bravery already installed an alternative telephone system, and this alone enabled the Fighter Wings to be controlled up to the moment of evacuation. His resource, initiative, and personal disregard of danger were conspicious.

    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/details-result.asp?Edoc_Id=7652944&queryType=1&resultcount=1
    Name Pickard, Harold
    Rank: Captain
    Regiment: 1 Air Formation Signals attached Royal Air Force Component
    Theatre of Combat or Operation: British Expeditionary Force 1939-40
    Award: Military Cross
    Date of Announcement in London Gazette: 02 May 1941
    Date 1940-1942
    Catalogue reference WO 373/16

    London Gazette:
    29 April 1941
    http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/35150/supplements/2493
    The Military Cross.
    Captain (acting Major) Herbert Pickard (62320), Royal Corps of Signals.
     
  12. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    From The Times, Friday, May 31, 1940
    GALLANTRY IN THE FIELD
    B.E.F. AWARDS

    GREGORY, 2319579, Signalman A., Royal Corps of Signals

    Devotion to duty and coolness during heavy enemy bombing and shelling attacks. While acting as operator on a wireless truck, he remained at his post and was unperturbed even by the most furious onslaughts from the air and on the ground.


    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/details-result.asp?Edoc_Id=7651810&queryType=1&resultcount=4
    Name Gregory, A
    Rank: Signalman
    Service No: 2319579
    Regiment: Royal Corps of Signals attached 7 Royal Tank Regiment
    Theatre of Combat or Operation: British Expeditionary Force
    Award: Military Medal
    Date of Announcement in London Gazette: 05 July 1940
    Date 1940
    Catalogue reference WO 373/15
     
  13. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    The Times, Tuesday, Jun 18, 1940
    ARMY AWARDS
    ACTS OF GALLANTRY AND RESOURCE

    MILITARY CROSS
    Sec. Lieut. (Acting Lt.) JOHN JEROME COLLINS, R. SIGNALS

    This officer found himself at La Panne, on the beach, without any proper signals staff. He, however, not only ran a corps signal office for some time, using dispatch riders and orderlies, without a relief, but personally found and laid cables with his own hands under shell fire and bombing. He was consistently cool in a situation of great difficulty and set a fine example to the men under him.


    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/details-result.asp?Edoc_Id=7652737&queryType=1&resultcount=7
    Name Collins, John Jerome
    Rank: Second Lieutenant
    Regiment: Royal Signals
    Theatre of Combat or Operation: British Expeditionary Force 1939-40
    Award: Military Cross
    Date of Announcement in London Gazette: 20 December 1940
    Date 1940-1942
    Catalogue reference WO 373/16
     
  14. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    The Times, Tuesday, Jun 18, 1940
    ARMY AWARDS
    ACTS OF GALLANTRY AND RESOURCE

    MILITARY MEDAL
    LINGWOOD, No. 2574905, L/Cpl., R.L., R. SIGNALS.

    This N.C.O. was in a cable detachment which passed by accident into the enemy lines and was captured. The detachment was marched away under escort, and Lance-Corporal Lingwood seized the opportunity afforded by a moment of inattention on the part of the escort to call on his men to escape. They responded instantly, and succeeded in rejoining the unit by swimming a canal. Thus this N.C.O. saved six men (and a party of Belgian soldiers) from capture.


    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/details-result.asp?Edoc_Id=7652598&queryType=1&resultcount=1
    Name Lingwood, R L
    Service No: 2574905
    Regiment: Royal Signals
    Theatre of Combat or Operation: British Expeditionary Force 1939-40
    Award: Military Medal
    Date of Announcement in London Gazette: 22 October 1940
    Date 1940-1942
    Catalogue reference WO 373/16
     
    Drew5233 likes this.
  15. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    London Gazette 16th October 1945:
    The KING has been graciously pleased to approve the posthumous award of the George Cross, in recognition of most conspicuous gallantry in carrying out hazardous work in a very brave manner, to: —No. 2328696 Signalman Kenneth SMITH, Royal Corps of Signals (Humby, near Grantham, Lines.).

    On 10th Jan 1945 two bombs were planted by the Utashi in houses in which the LRDG were billeted. In order to save the family and his radio equipment Kenneth Smith picked up one of the bombs and ran out of the house. When he was a short distance from the house the bomb exploded killing him.


    On the night of 10th January 1945, on the island of Ist in the Adriatic, Signalman Smith was a member of a patrol of the Long Range Desert Group which was attacked by saboteurs, who laid time bombs in vital houses on the island. After hearing some shots, Signalman Smith entered the wireless room and found one such bomb on the table. Realizing that there were a number of partisans in the room and young children elsewhere in the house, Signalman Smith immediately picked up the bomb, which was ticking. He intended to move it to a place of safety behind a wall nearby, but he had gone only a few yards outside the house when the bomb exploded and he was blown to pieces.
    There is no doubt that Signalman Smith's actions saved the lives of many of his comrades, partisans, and civilians, and that he showed superb courage and a complete disregard for personal safety inlifting a time bomb which was already ticking, when he knew it might explode at any moment


    [​IMG]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_Smith_(British_Army_soldier)

    Bit of a sad story regarding the George Cross but it's in the best place now.

    Royal Signals Museum - Medal Display - George Cross


    CWGC :: Casualty Details :poppy:

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    001 ABEL JB 4624258 - 01/10/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    002 ABERDEIN JE 2344407 18TH DIV SIGS 13/07/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    003 ABERDIEN J 2327014 23 CONSTR SEC 19/10/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    004 ABRAMS L 14639347 - 18/12/1947 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    005 ADAMS FJ 6351063 6TH AIRBORNE DIV SIGS 24/03/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    006 ADAMS LC 2366526 - 22/07/1946 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    007 ADAMS JD 2563654 - 20/04/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    008 ADAMS GL 2582098 G BTY, RA SIG SEC 12/09/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    009 ADAMS JAP 2326246 - 06/04/1947 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    010 ADAMS J 2346458 27 SEARCHLIGHT REGT, RA, SIG SEC 24/03/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    011 ADAMSON LC 2318694 3RD DIV SIGS 08/06/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    012 ADAMSON T 2343445 10 INDIAN DIV SIGS 17/08/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    013 ADAMSON G 2355065 15 HQ SIGS 05/06/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    014 ADAMSON JJ 3191032 80 ANTI TANK REGT, RA, SIG SEC 14/12/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    015 ADAMTHWAITE J 2389896 56TH DIV SIGS 03/12/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    016 ADDISON FJR 2576717 2ND ARMD BDE SIG SQN 27/08/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    017 ADLINGTON JT 14287170 - 29/11/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    018 AGAN U 2336948 6 ARMY AIR SUPPORT CONTROL SIGS 05/01/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    019 AILWARD GA 14279335 78TH DIV SIGS 20/03/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    020 AINSWORTH JW 14291772 - 10/12/1946 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    021 AITCHISON RM 2584333 51ST DIV SIGS 30/08/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    022 AITKEN AJ 145788 15 INF BDE SIG SEC 13/12/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    023 AKRIGG H 3863664 ATTD XV 03/08/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    024 ALABASTER HJ 2354690 - 07/09/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    025 ALBERRY EA 2348537 38TH INF DIV SIGS 19/10/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    026 ALBON H 2361821 15 FIELD REGT, RA, SIG SEC 01/09/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    027 ALDEN DV 2366657 18TH DIV SIGS 12/09/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    028 ALDERMAN RW 2319637 48TH DIV SIGS 15/02/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    029 ALDERMAN NF 2386538 45 LT AA REGT, RA SIG SEC 20/11/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    030 ALDERMAN JH 2580601 18TH DIV SIGS 31/07/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    031 ALDERSON E 2354263 GHQ SIGS 07/11/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    032 ALDRED D 2355184 - 24/08/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    033 ALDRIDGE JS 2323194 4TH INDIAN DIV SIGS 16/06/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    034 ALEXANDER RK 14278875 - 05/02/1946 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    035 ALEXANDER PM 2329445 2ND DESPATCH RIDER SEC 04/05/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    036 ALEXANDER JM 2337884 ATTD 11TH INDIAN DIV SIGS 22/11/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    037 ALEXANDER RD 2056052 - 03/10/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    038 ALEXANDER BE 2328401 SINGAPORE FORTRESS SIGS 21/09/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    039 ALLAN F 2353071 FIRST ARMY SIGS 06/12/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    040 ALLAN DA 2341514 ATTD 11TH INDIAN DIV SIGS 16/05/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    041 ALLAN AW 2584035 - 29/05/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    042 ALLAN M 2329904 22ND ARMD BDE SIGS 14/07/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    043 ALLAN CS 117710 44TH DIV SIGS 29/05/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    044 ALLAN R 2327586 5 SEARCHLIGHT BDE SIGS 28/05/1940 - - 02/06/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    045 ALLCOAT PS 2587006 2 ARMD DIV SIGS THE MIDDLESEX YEOMANRY 08/12/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    046 ALLEN W 2326964 AIRBORNE DIV SIGS 14/07/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    047 ALLEN FW 2359394 5 ARMY AIR SUPPORT CONTROL SIGS 27/10/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    048 ALLEN DA 2381828 XXXIII CORPS SIGS 26/05/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    049 ALLEN EA 2310499 10 L OF C SIGS 12/05/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    050 ALLEN AJ 2371381 8TH ARMY SIGNALS 18/12/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    051 ALLEN J 2356248 18TH DIV SIGS 12/09/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    052 ALLEN WJ 2324132 SINGAPORE FORTRESS SIGS 30/10/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    053 ALLEN DN 2601733 7 ARMD BDE SIGS 09/09/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    054 ALLEN WR 2334787 4TH HQ SIGS 26/09/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    055 ALLEN J 2360839 50TH DIV SIGS 28/05/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    056 ALLEN RJ 2589502 5TH DIV SIGS 10/07/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    057 ALLENBY C 5891107 4TH DIV SIGS 07/07/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    058 ALLIN BL 2589561 HONG KONG SIG COY 01/10/1942 - - 02/10/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    059 ALLISON GH 245639 - 20/04/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    060 ALLISON T 2382640 51ST HIGHLAND DIV SIGS 31/10/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    061 ALLISON JCD 6468271 56TH DIV SIGS 05/03/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    062 ALLISON W 2570974 52 DIV SIGS 26/02/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    063 ALLSEBROOK JW 2313278 23 LINE MAINT SEC 19/06/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    064 ALMOND A 2360239 - 26/11/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    065 ALTOFT FC 2390204 6 Z AIR FORM SIGS 18/02/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    066 ALVARADO PM 5121113 6TH AIRBORNE DIV SIGS 02/08/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    067 AMOS VF 3775126 - 01/02/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    068 ANDERSON A 14707273 - 22/07/1947 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    069 ANDERSON J 2341704 ATTD III INDIAN CORPS SIGS 19/06/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    070 ANDERSON T 2335176 - 29/06/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    071 ANDERSON A 3194368 9TH INDIAN DIV SIGS 09/12/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    072 ANDERSON EC 2347218 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS 20/12/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    073 ANDERSON T 2576020 ATTD 28TH INDIAN INF BDE SIGS 21/02/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    074 ANDERSON AS 222621 - 22/12/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    075 ANDERSON RC 14902515 - 22/11/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    076 ANDERSON RO 14311367 - 22/11/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    077 ANDERSON CR 6826760 - 14/12/1939 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    078 ANDERSON JT 5126075 2 AIR FORMATION SIGS 25/08/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    079 ANDERSON T 2384748 - 20/05/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    080 ANDREWS DEJ 2588110 5TH AA DIV SIGS 11/04/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    081 ANDREWS RB 2378307 XXX CORPS SIGS 28/07/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    082 ANDREWS A 2360240 - 21/09/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    083 ANGIER EJA 14417986 165 DESPATCH RIDER SEC 10/06/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    084 ANGUS T 2586187 SPECIAL FORCE SIGS 11/03/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    085 ANSELL CE 2371318 MALAYA COMMAND SIGS 25/02/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    086 ANSELL GE 2589109 9 LINE MAINT SEC 10/06/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    087 ANSELL GA 2337656 THIRD ARMY SIGS 15/10/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    088 ANSETT WG 2323443 SINGAPORE FORTRESS SIGS 12/09/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    089 ANTELL HJ 5731670 48TH DIV SIGS 24/09/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    090 ANTHONY BEA 2335321 6 HAA REGT, RA SIG SEC 03/12/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    091 APPLEBY FC 2384890 1 AIR FORMATION SIGNALS 07/02/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    092 APPLETON I 3440778 - 05/09/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    093 APPLETON FW 2391647 2 L OF C SIGS 24/06/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    094 APPS DW 2326131 EIGHTH ARMY GROUP RA SIG SEC 15/07/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    095 ARBUTHNOT MH 145439 - 16/10/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    096 ARCHER R 2322400 10 INDEP MOTOR BDE SIG SEC 02/03/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    097 ARCHIBALD RBF 2378826 W AIR FORMATION SIGS 25/06/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    098 ARMAN RC 2364283 47TH DIV SIGS 22/07/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    099 ARMITAGE H 2311154 29 CONSTR SEC 04/06/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    100 ARMSTRONG TW 2349086 HQ 121 LINE SEC 21/07/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    101 ARMSTRONG JM 187856 - 23/04/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    102 ARMSTRONG JW 104361 - 01/11/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    103 ARNOLD AE 2592976 ATTD IV INDIAN CORPS SIGS 17/07/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    104 ARNOLD RS 2319349 18TH DIV SIGS 26/06/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    105 ARNOLD W 2323853 77 HAA REGT, RA SIG SEC 29/11/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    106 ARNOLD WSJ 2579988 - 11/01/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    107 ARNOLD EH 2592228 6TH AIR FORMATION SIGS 13/10/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    108 ARNOLD B 14959302 32 INDEP L OF C SIGS 23/08/1947 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    109 ARNOTT J 2327031 27 LINE SEC 24/08/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    110 ARROWSMITH J 2390939 - 02/07/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    111 ARROWSMITH W 2328975 76TH DIV SIGS 19/03/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    112 ARTHINGTON-DAVY WH 2329451 6TH ARMY AIR SUPPORT CONTROL SEC 17/06/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    113 ARTHUR RH 132530 - 06/03/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    114 ARUNDALE JS 2343236 ATTD 11TH INDIAN DIV SIGS 02/04/1942 - - 03/04/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    115 ARUNDEL JF 2356642 ATTD 9TH INDIAN DIV SIGS 14/02/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    116 ASBREY R 2585088 - 27/03/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    117 ASCOTT EE 2569440 4TH DIV SIGS 31/05/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    118 ASCOUGH J 7662377 11TH AA DIV SIGS 09/04/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    119 ASHALL J 3392615 ATTD 7TH INDIAN DIV SIGS 06/02/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    120 ASHCROFT RC 4741611 1ST ARMD DIV SIGS 22/01/1942 - - 20/05/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    121 ASHCROFT J 2596779 ATTD GHQ SIGS INDIA 02/06/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    122 ASHE HWB 86845 56 DIV SIGS 18/09/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    123 ASHE JH 556257 5 L OF C SIGS THE CHESHIRE YEOMANRY 09/11/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    124 ASHFORD WH 2316835 - 25/03/1946 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    125 ASHLEY HG 2593239 9TH INDIAN DIV SIGS 21/01/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    126 ASHLEY JW 2339882 X CORPS SIGS 03/01/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    127 ASHTON J 2596781 17TH AA REGT, RA SIG SEC 18/12/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    128 ASHTON G 2589574 - 20/03/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    129 ASHURST PSG 3972081 20TH INDIAN DIV SIGS 14/03/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    130 ASHWORTH FB 14220762 11TH ARMD DIV SIGS 03/08/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    131 ASHWORTH T 2352967 6TH ARMY AIR SUPPORT CONTROL SEC 13/11/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    132 ASHWORTH ABN 2343604 1 AIR FORM SIGS 07/01/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    133 ASHWORTH E 2341364 6 HAA REGT, RA SIG SEC 19/11/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    134 ASHWORTH F 2332242 22ND ARMD BDE SIGS 12/06/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    135 ASKEW WH 2311580 - 17/11/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    136 ASKINS SF 2586989 54TH DIV SIGNALS 05/12/1939 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    137 ASSER TW 2333678 4 L OF C SIGS 07/06/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    138 ASTLEY F 2331142 4TH DIV SIGS 28/02/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    139 ASTON H 6975376 - 19/11/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    140 ATFIELD ED 2348115 ATTD 11TH INDIAN DIV SIGS 26/12/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    141 ATHERTON J 10691019 24TH TANK BDE SIGS 09/08/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    142 ATHERTON J 2357787 - 31/08/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    143 ATKIN W 1856158 - 06/04/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    144 ATKIN H 2583124 - 23/05/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    145 ATKINS ET 14672601 GHQ SIGS 10/01/1947 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    146 ATKINSON E 2325182 HONG KONG SIG COY 01/10/1942 - - 02/10/1942 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    147 ATTHILL HDS 75448 - 19/06/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    148 ATTRILL JG 14431405 - 06/06/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    149 ATTWOOD JH 14216739 - 22/11/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    150 AUBURN WE 10669359 78TH DIV SIGS 27/05/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    151 AUCHMUTY GCD 85573 - 23/03/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    152 AUSTEN WJ 2061817 ATTD 16/04/1941 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    153 AUSTEN KM 240621 - 09/07/1943 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    154 AUSTIN FK 77575 - 24/02/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    155 AVERY AD 7889658 - 07/07/1945 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    156 AVONS JM 2363023 - 20/06/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    157 AXWORTHY JE 804577 - 25/06/1940 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    158 AYRTON RM 2374376 34TH TANK BDE SIGS 10/10/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
    159 AZORE REJ 14232132 7TH AIR FORMATION SIGS 23/02/1944 ROYAL CORPS OF SIGNALS
     
  17. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    The Times, 1st July 1940. Awarded the Military Medal.

    Citation reads:
    This soldier showed great coverage and devotion to duty throughout the operations from May 17 to June 2. Brigade Headquarters was entirely dependent on three despatch riders for all communications. As one of these Signalman Gill was on duty all hours of the day and night. He had to traverse roads which were under shell or aerial bombardment and frequently machine-gun fire. He showed great resource and initiative and never failed to deliver his message. At times he was forced to use roads which were unprotected by our troops and partially in the hands of the enemy.
     
  18. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Signalman Henry Raymond Ward MM, 46 Divisional Signals attached 46 Div Counter Mortar Organisation, The Royal Corps of Signals.

    Awarded Military Medal

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    The Times. Thursday, 21st September 1939
    ‘Development of Signals’


    Lieutenant-General Sir John Fowler K.C.B. K.C.M.G. D.S.O. of Manor House, Wilton who died at Harrogate yesterday, was a sapper who, as a young officer, saw a considerable amount of fighting on the North-West Frontier of India. He afterwards played a great part in the development of Army Signals. Being Director of this service on the Western Front throughout the last war.

    John Sharman Fowler, the second son of Mr R. Fowler, of Rahinston, County Meath, was born on July 29th 1864 and went to Cheltenham before passing into the Royal Military Academy. He received his commission in the Royal Engineers in January, 1886, and first saw service with the Isazai expedition of 1892 in the Black Mountain Region. During the Chitral Campaign of 1895 he was at first with the Gilgit Force in the fighting of the post of Reshan and after being wounded, was subsequently captured and then released – an extraordinary adventure. Later he accompanied the Relief Force and was present at the action of Mamagai, his services being mentioned in dispatches and rewarded with the D.S.O. He was promoted Captain in September, 1895. In 1897 he saw something of the operation in the Mohmand and in the Tirah country, being again ‘Mentioned’. He came home from India to enter into the Staff College as a specially selected candidate at the beginning of 1898, and graduated after the outbreak of the South African War. He arrived at the Cape in February, 1900, and in June was appointed Director of Telegraphs in the Orange River Colony. This post he held until the peace and after, receiving another ‘Mention’ and a Brevet Majority.

    Promoted to substantive Major in the Royal Engineers in December, 1903, he went to the 2nd Division at Aldershot in March 1905, as D.A.A.G., later becoming D.A.A. and Q.M.G., and served the full four years there. In 1911 he was given the Brevet of Lieutenant-Colonel and appointed an instructor at the Staff College, where Colonel (Later Field Marshall Sir) William Robertson was Commandant. He reached the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in his Corps at the end of 1911. Fowler left Camberley to become Commandant of the Army Signals School at Aldershot and Bulford in April, 1913, and when at the outbreak of the last war, the British Expeditionary Force was mobilized his appointment to the Director of Army Signals in France was an obvious selection. He remained at G.H.Q. in that capacity until May 1919, shouldering great responsibilities for the development on progressive lines of signal communications – Personnel, equipment and organisation – as the armies expanded and the character of warfare changed, was a matter of first importance. In 1915 he was created C.B. and in January 1916, he received the brevet of colonel, being promoted a major general a year later: he was made K.C.M.G. in 1918. His services were mentioned eight times in dispatches.

    Under his direction the few signals companies, Royal Engineers of 1914 had grown during the War into an establishment of some 70,000 men. Increasing use was made of wireless and buried telephone cables and he had no compunction in calling upon General Post Office experts to assist in perfecting and standardizing equipment. He sponsored the idea by which Army Signals became an integral part of the machinery of command, operating directly under the General Staff: and when, after the war, The Royal Corps of Signals was formed it was fitting that he should become its first Colonel Commandant. The appointment was made in September, 1923, Fowler vacating it on reaching the age limit at the end of 1934.

    In February, 1921 he became G.O.C. at Singapore, and was given the China Command in the following June. He returned home in March, 1925 and was promoted Lieutenant-General in February, 1926, the year in which he was made K.C.B. He retired from the Army in March, 1928.

    In 1904 he married Mary Henrietta Olivia, daughter of the late Mr John M. Brooke and leaves two daughters, Lady Godley, wife of General Sir Alexander Godley, was his sister.



    [​IMG]

    It appears he was of Irish decent too.
    Centre for First World War Studies
     
  20. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    Lieutenant John Ormsby McCormick, Royal Corps of Signals, was awarded the Military Cross.
    Lieutenant McCormick was with the forward troops during the attack on the Djebel Er Roumana on April 6th, 1943. On the way forward from the start line the vehicle used by him received a direct hit from a shell. He immediately returned, personally brought forward another vehicle and succeeded in establishing a forward signal centre under most trying conditions. Throughout the whole of the day the area was subjected to continuous shelling, mortar and machine-gun fire with the result that the signal lines were continuously cut, but this officer again and again personally supervised the maintenance and extension of the communications, frequently accompanying forward patrols for this purpose. The almost uninterrupted flow of information received owing to this officer’s coolness under heavy and accurate fire was of the utmost value to all concerned. His work was of exceptional value and his courage under fire a great inspiration and fine example to all those under him.


    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/details-result.asp?Edoc_Id=7656779&queryType=1&resultcount=1
    Name McCormick, John Ormsby
    Rank: Lieutenant
    Service No: 204880
    Regiment: 'J' Section 51 Highland Divisional Signals attached Headquarters 152 Infantry Brigade
    Theatre of Combat or Operation: Middle East (Egypt and Libya)
    Award: Military Cross
    Date of Announcement in London Gazette: 17 June 1943
    Date 1943
    Catalogue reference WO 373/25

    London Gazette:
    30 September 1941
    http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/35294/supplements/5719
    15 June 1943
    http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/36057/supplements/2760


    See this thread for ref:
    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/research-material/19413-volunteers-eire-who-have-won-distinctions.html#post195852
    :irishflag[1]:
     

Share This Page