POW logbook pictures and more

Discussion in 'Prisoners of War' started by Incredibledisc, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    Hi all,

    My great grandfather was a POW from 1940-45 and was interned in a number of camps. I recently discovered his YMCA logbook in the archives at Stirling Castle and was able to photograph its contents. The isn't too much in the way of actual diary entries but what it does have are the names and addresses of many of the men he was in the camps with along with several photos - including some of what appear to be a funeral.

    The files can be viewed here https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0zlm99v1lubifjs/AABs4ArZ7Wf51B7k-HD-BMOha?dl=0
    Please feel free to have a look and post below any revelations you might discover regarding the people in the photos etc. Sorry some of the photos are the wrong way around - apparently I hold my phone the incorrect way when I use it to take pictures!
     
    ozzy16, BarbaraWT, von Poop and 3 others like this.
  2. andy007

    andy007 Senior Member

    What a great collection of items, I haven't had a detailed look through but it is always interesting to note a few New Zealanders among the names as well as a lad from Bridge of Allan where my ancestors are from.

    I will be back to have another look through, thank you for sharing them with us.
     
    Incredibledisc likes this.
  3. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    A fascinating collection there. Thanks for posting the link here.
     
  4. NickFenton

    NickFenton Well-Known Member

    A great set of documents.

    I t must be in here but l have not found it yet but for the record, which camps was he in on what dates?

    Do you have his liberation questionnaire?

    Regards,

    Nick
     
  5. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    Hi Nick. I got someone to look at the liberation questionnaires and it appears he didn't complete one. The best info I have on dates is on the photo below but I'm not sure how complete the information is as at least one page of photos had Stalag VIII-B written on it and he doesn't list it here. I think these are dates and places where he was "annochlated" - I assume he meant inoculated?
    image.jpeg
     
  6. NickFenton

    NickFenton Well-Known Member

    Bill,

    I had picked up Stalag IXc Bad Sulza from the photographs hence the connection. I think your Grandfather was army but there were a lot of RAF in that camp during his stay there, including my Father. The pictures of the boxing match are possibly the diversion that was used by Nabarro and Hall to make their escape over the wire, both being subsequently captured, so l would certainly be interested in anything else you could add on that. I think l may recognise some of the RAF guys but l need to take a closer look.

    He also went to Stalag Luft 3, Sagan, an RAF camp and by June 1943, an officers camp, with the majority of OR going off to Heydekrug, so it is also likely that he volunteered to be an orderly or batman for one of the officers and that he was involved in the Marches out of Sagan in the Winter of 44/45.

    Regards,

    Nick
     
  7. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    For Info - 2 McVey's recorded

    H McVey Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders Hartmannsdorf, Saxony 2987348 12162 IV-F 16

    R McVey Seaforth Highlanders Lambinowice, Poland 2823938 16555 344 16

    TD
     
  8. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    Hey Nick, that ties in with what I know. He was a L/Cpl in the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders captured June 1940. The salt mines at Bad Sulza were his first stop (he'd been a coal miner in civvy street). According to my mother he was an Officer's batman - she seemed to think he had some contact with Douglas Bader - I'm sure I checked the dates and it is possible they were both in Warburg at the same time. Gorlitz was the location given on other documents I have relating to his time in the bag. I noticed "Wings" Day and Wing Commander T. Trumble prominently featured and wondered if he had been an orderly for either of them. I put in a FOI request for his camp index card yesterday which might give more precise dates and locations.

    image.jpg image.jpeg
     
  9. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    More from my great grandfather's account of his captivity. The bit at the bottom may be of interest to you Nick - more dates and places.
    image.jpeg
     
  10. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    Another interesting one. I read that officers often helped out other ranks financially. If you look closely at this page you can see my great grandfather has noted various amounts. My mother told me that my great grandad was "looked after" by the officers and thinks someone might even have sent him money after the war.

    image.jpeg
     
  11. NickFenton

    NickFenton Well-Known Member

    Bill,

    I will have a good look through over night. Can you confirm his full name as per Richard's post and l will have a look myself at Kew.

    I hate the Mac files. They could be located in many different locations and the sorters seemed to ignore whether it was Mc, Mac, or any other variation, as we know they were instructed to do. There are 5 possibilities for every one so l am not surprised it was not found. That does not mean it is there.

    If you check out my web site you will get an idea of life at Bad Sulza but what the guys went through prior to my Father arriving in July 1941 can only be described as hell. The number of Christmas menu's and greetings can only have made it more poignant, especially as every one said 'It will be over by Christmas.' It was but not the one they hoped for.

    Andy on here can help you with when he was captured but the book 'Dunkirk, The ones they left behind' by Sean Longden will also give you an idea of what they went through.

    On the issue of pay, I think my web site covers it but Officers were able to draw down money and get things sent from home as private parcels but other ranks could not, so the officers helped them, loaning them money until this was possible, to get by. I would not be surprised if this carried on as your Great Grandfather would also have been paid for the work he did at labour camps in camp currency, a worthless currency, but at the end of the war the British Government deducted this money, together with the cost of lost equipment from their back pay. (Not a reason for independence now!!!!) Some officers would have seen that as inequitable.

    Regards,

    Nick
     
  12. NickFenton

    NickFenton Well-Known Member

    By the way, post those middle eastern photos separately under a suitable heading, someone might recognise the location. Great photos.
     
  13. NickFenton

    NickFenton Well-Known Member

    Have you noticed one guy boxing in Granddads slippers?
     
  14. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    Full disclosure - it was your website I read the part about officers helping out with money :)

    I think there is some confusion - my great grandfather was L/Cpl John Conway, 7th Battalion Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, serial 2980896. I think Richard got the McVey name from somewhere else in the book.

    image.jpeg
     
  15. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    Is that the French Foreign Legion ones? Will get them up at some point.
     
  16. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    This fella? Only once you pointed it out!

    image.jpeg
     
  17. NickFenton

    NickFenton Well-Known Member

    There are quite a few, l know.

    Have you seen all the clogs too?

    The picture of the guy with the accordion, my Father's group nicked one, very upset they were, and made it into air bellows for a tunnel.

    I hope that either they silenced it or they leant to play a tune at the same time.

    The YMCA log book was issued in 1945 so that makes sense.

    The 'bird' in the long frock was not a lady admirer, but l think an 'RAF' member of one of the plays.

    I know one of the batmen who was at Stalag Luft 3 so l will be asking him.

    Regards,

    Nick
     
  18. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    Much appreciated Nick. Laughing at your accordion comment
     
  19. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    Reading the recent thread about VCs being sold off got me thinking. The logbook all these photos are taken from is in the hands of the A&SH Regimental museum - presumably donated either by my Great grandfather or by his next of kin. The book is not on display and is kept in the archives and if it hadn't been for a comment by my mum when I told her I was researching the family history I would have been completely unaware of its existence. Would it be possible to approach the museum with a view to having it returned to the family? Anyone had experience of doing similar to get back family items that have passed out of their ownership?
     
  20. Incredibledisc

    Incredibledisc Well-Known Member

    Any more info on this guy?


    image.jpeg


    I did a Google search and found this...

    Cretan General Solon Kaffatos, a distinguished veteran of WWl (Companion of the Order of the Bath from Field Marshall Lord Milne, French CdG, Serbian CdG, Greek Military Medla twice).
     
    MI9 likes this.

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