Identification of Patches

Discussion in 'WW2 Militaria' started by Capt Beekee, Oct 13, 2010.

  1. Capt Beekee

    Capt Beekee Junior Member

    Hi
    Once again, can anyone help identify these patches? I havent a clue!
    Many thanks.
     
  2. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Identification of Patches

    Hi
    Once again, can anyone help identify these patches? I havent a clue!
    Many thanks.


    An attachment might help :)

    Ron
     
  3. Capt Beekee

    Capt Beekee Junior Member

    Sorry, here are the pics.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    The second sign is sign of the Northern Ireland District.
     
  5. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Capt Beekee

    That's better ! (from someone who is always forgetting to add an image)

    If you are sure it's British then try Peter G's super website here:
    British Formation Signs

    I'll also be looking :)

    Ron
     
  6. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

  7. Capt Beekee

    Capt Beekee Junior Member

    Thanks Sol, can you possibley date the N I patch?

    Thanks for the other info, everyone.
     
  8. RosyRedd

    RosyRedd Senior Member

    I also have the Irish Gate on a green background patch. It was my Gradad's when was in the RAOC around 1938/1939. He was based in Carrickfergus (in case that helps) :)

    Jules

    Found this about the Irish Gate:

    A 3-barred gate flanked by pillars on a green background was the sign of VI Corps and Corps Troops, the sign was removed from the official list of signs in November 1941.
     
  9. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    I don't know from what date it was used, but it was a sign of NID during the ww2 and, at list for some time, after the war. There were couple of variation of this sign and also some other signs were used by NID, like bird in nest on the green rectangle.
     
  10. wtid45

    wtid45 Very Senior Member

    First looks very much like US pathfinder badge:
    QM History Research - U.S. Army Pathfinder Badge - U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum - Fort Lee, Virginia

    Don't know if it's used by other armies, or issued to non US soldiers?
    A bit more on the Pathfinder badge here.
    WW2 Pathfinder Wing-British Made[​IMG][​IMG]A division Pathfinder School, under Captain Frank Lillyman, was established in Nottingham, England before D-Day. Volunteers from all regiments and some battalions of the division trained there, to learn how to signal incoming formations of troop-carrying planes, using radar, lights, smoke pots,'biscuit guns', and other devices. These patches, which were worn on the lower left sleeve above any hash marks or overseas bars, were originally made in England. The specimens shown, are of typical Brit construction-a cotton design embroidered on a blue wool base.
    Any paratrooper who completed the training was eligible to wear this patch, regardless of whether he ever made a combat jump AS a Pathfinder. Of course the actual trained signallers wore it,as well as associated Air Corps Troop Carrier crews. It was also worn by security personnel, who didn't take the PF signalling training, but who parachuted in ahead of the main body of invaders with the Pathfinders, and protected them as they performed their duties on enemy held ground. These security men, chosen from various rifle companies only a week before D-Day, were also eligible to wear the Pathfinder wing. Hilary McKenna, who served as security for Team 1 of the 501st Normandy Pathfinders, provided the example illustrated above left. The example at right was provided by Harry Hendersin of B/506th, who completed the PF signalling training, but who never jumped in a Pathfinder capacity in combat. Harry did make the Normandy and Holland jumps as a PIR rifleman.
    Note that the Hendersin wing has been trimmed closer to the wing and torch, leaving a much narrower blue border around them. The patch also appears larger than McKennea's but it is not-this is just a result of the way the images were cropped and saved.
    Most original specimens were trimmed in a way that left more blue edging, as with McKenna's specimen. Although both of these specimens are of original British WW2 era manufacture, they were clearly made by different companies. The obverse of Hendersin's type has already been duplicated very closely by the Repro makers.


    [​IMG][​IMG]Above, the reverse of 2 original WW2 Brit made Pathfinder Wings, showing variance of construction. Example at left is McKenna's wing. At right is a close-trimmed wing from Harry Hendersin of B/506th. I have another example from Joe Haller (HQ/1 501), which has a almost transparent protective cloth across the back, made of very thin black cloth.
    Insignia
     
  11. airborne medic

    airborne medic Very Senior Member

    In 2004 at Arnhem I spoke with a British pathfinder who was originally in the 21st Ind Para Company but was left behind if those are the right words to form the 1st Ind Para Platoon and he told me that wore this badge in Italy/France.....just can't remember his name at the moment......
     
  12. wtid45

    wtid45 Very Senior Member

    In 2004 at Arnhem I spoke with a British pathfinder who was originally in the 21st Ind Para Company but was left behind if those are the right words to form the 1st Ind Para Platoon and he told me that wore this badge in Italy/France.....just can't remember his name at the moment......
    Intresting I have heard that those within 1st Allied Airborne may well have qualified to wear it:unsure:
     
  13. airborne medic

    airborne medic Very Senior Member

    He was also wearing it on his blazer cuff!
     

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