Formation Sign discovered on the Wing of my '42 Bedford - can anyone id?

Discussion in 'General' started by David_Coles, Nov 4, 2018.

  1. David_Coles

    David_Coles New Member

    Hello All - just joined the group. I restore WW2 radios normally but have done a Jeep and have just taken on a Bedford MW. Whilst removing the paint on the front wing I discovered a formation sign I didn't recognise. Can anybody help me identify please? It appears to be a shield of vertical red and blue stripes on a yellow background. It could of course be a post war marking. Thanks for any help. David
     

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  2. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

  3. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Your photo is on it's side so I'll stand it up.

    unknown sign.JPG
     
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  4. Blutto

    Blutto Plane Mad

    The closest I can find is a Northumbrian District sign, but not with the exact positioning of the vertical red bars.
     
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  5. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter Patron 1940 Obsessive

    I think that you're right, Blutto. If you're using Cole as a reference, then he does say that he is dealing with cloth uniform badges. Vehicle signs were often simplified and adapted to aid application, especially if no transfers were available. It's perhaps logical that most of the surviving vehicles in the UK should have seen service with Commands and Districts etc.
     
  6. chrisgrove

    chrisgrove Senior Member

    Here's a new idea: 25 Armoured Assault Brigade, but painted over another sign which involved a yellow square.
    Chris
     
  7. SDP

    SDP Senior Member Patron

    Chris

    That makes a lot of sense except shouldn't there be a diablo if it's from a Tank Brigade?
     
  8. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Northumberland District WW2.

    Mike

    These armorial bearings exist in many forms and variations but always in the form of a red and yellow fence pattern. Supposedly originating with the banner of the Kings of Bernicia, a Saxon kingdom consisting roughly of the counties of northern England and southern Scotland. All the lands north of the Humber (hence Northumberland) and south of the Forth.

    Well done Blutto.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2018

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