Which evacuation port?

Discussion in '1940' started by CROONAERT, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. CROONAERT

    CROONAERT Ipsissimus

    Any idea which port was the most likely evacuation point for a soldier who was severely wounded near Arras on 21st May 1940?

    Dieppe or Le Havre, perhaps?

    Cheers

    Dave
     
  2. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    I think the Germans reached the Channel on the 20th(?) thus cutting off the BEF. I think Boulogne may be a option?
     
  3. TTH

    TTH Senior Member

    Try the official medical history, the various volumes often give such information. The war diary of the BEF DMS would have it too, if you can get to Kew.
     
  4. CROONAERT

    CROONAERT Ipsissimus

    Thanks for the replies.

    Andy, it definately wasn't Boulogne. There is only one certainty in his story after the wounding and that is that he was evacuated from France on a hospital ship from a port in 'High Normandy' - by which, I presume, is 'Haute Normandie' (ie. Dieppe, Le Havre, etc). I wonder if this particular medical evacuation route 'ran the gauntlet' between the German attackers to break through... must have been a hell of a journey if this is so!

    Cheers.

    Dave
     
  5. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    The only other place I can think of then is Fecamp. Don't suppose you know the ships name?
     
  6. Roy Martin

    Roy Martin Senior Member

    Dave,

    The evacuations continued until 25 June. Many, though by no means all, of the injured were saved by Hospital Carriers (different from hospital ships - effectively marine ambulances). Most of these were Packets, the ferries of their day, their duties also included trooping. An example is the WORTHING, a Southern Railway ship, who, because of damage incurred when ship was bombed returning with 300 casualties from Dunkirk, didn't resume medical duties until 13 June when she brought wounded from Le Havre to Southampton Others include St Julien, Paris, Isle of Guernsey and Brighton. A source is BEF Ships, before, at and after Dunkirk by John de S Winser, with more detail in his Short Sea: Long War.
     
  7. JERICHO

    JERICHO Junior Member

    I think the exhaust port is Fecamp or Le Havre as hospitals ships Brighton Maid of Kent were bombed 21 May at Dieppe. Port facilities were also affected and I think no other hospital ship has stopped at Dieppe before 1944.
     

Share This Page