Military Slang

Discussion in 'General' started by Drew5233, Aug 21, 2008.

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  1. son of a rat

    son of a rat Senior Member

    I still use 'Shufti' all the time, picked up from my grandad (c.40 years in the signals) & dad. Certainly seems to be a 'campaign' word brought back by the troops.

    As we are from Suffolk, Dad says Shufte (desert talk for a look) also Gringe instead of fox hole.
     
  2. wowtank

    wowtank Very Senior Member

    As we are from Suffolk, Dad says Shufte (desert talk for a look) also Gringe instead of fox hole.

    I would have said Shufte was a fairly common slag expression now.

    Interesting about Gringe Is it meant as a Trench Fox hole or where the animal lives?
     
  3. How about "up the Blue". Dad uses it when talking about North Africa. I think it maybe Australian in origin?

    He also uses words and phrases that seem to have been Army standard slang from India and passed down from older soldiers.

    Mel
     
  4. Wills

    Wills Very Senior Member

    Hanging on your chin strap - knackered - Chin Strapped
    The Green Maggot - sleeping bag - The Barnes Wallace! (Shaped like the bouncer)
    Dhobi Dust - washing powder
    Brag Rags first heard that from a regimental tailor - medal ribbons!
    Petrol Budgies - Rotary fan drivers (Army Air Corps)
    NAAFI - No Ambition And Fuck All Interest
    Boondook - the Gat - shooting stick'
    Irons - Fighting (Bayonet) Irons Scoff - KFS.
    Fish and Chip Mob - line regiment!

    Donkey Wallopers - Cavalry


    Scots Guards - Forage Cap - 'Jaggy Bonnet' Ammunition Boots - 'Tackety Boots'

    You could fill a book. many go way back in history and some are from recent conflicts, the 'lingo' we understand and know well tends to give the era we served in or last served in.
     
  5. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Of the two main units I was with in wartime, it was the 4th QOH that seemed to use the most military slang. I suppose it was because of the fact that of the two units it was the only one with a background that went way back and which included Indian service.

    Whatever the reason was everyone used slang with Indian/Arab connotations and Jildee was in common usage as was kwoys kateer (how much) and kidna bujee (what time is it)

    Ron
     
  6. red devil

    red devil Senior Member

    Bleeps - Royal Signals
    Tankies - Royal Tank Regiment
    Rag & Oil - RAOC
    Desk Jockey - Clerk
    Queers on Horseback - QOH (Ron please note!)
    Death or glory boys - 17.21 Lancers
    Mushrooms - kept in dark and fed on ****
    mucker - mate
    Shufte - lets have a look
    pad brat - child of
    sky pilot - padre

    Regarding hold fire - we used it to say STOP!! not wait until you're gun goes POP!
     
  7. Wills

    Wills Very Senior Member

    Queer Objects On Horseback - Queen's Own Oxford Hussars



    Tankies -'Spam in a can'
     
  8. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Then there was always the "SWIRE SHUFTI" for a quick look followed by "JILDE"- to have a quick look at a beautiful "BINT"
    Cheers
     
  9. Pinhead

    Pinhead Stitch Monkey!

    Adding to the 'three square meals' post from ages ago...

    On the fiddle - the edge of the Naval square dinner plates was called the Fiddle. If your food spilled over on to this edge, you were said to be receiving more than your fair share and so, you were 'on the fiddle'.

    Now used to denote practices that aren't fair and un-deserved.

    Many terms have naval origins, so here's another...

    When you're asking to borrow something or be given something, such as " can I have a cigarette?", you're said to be "tapping someone up". This comes from the Naval term of 'tapping the Admiral' It's origin is thought to have come from the death of Lord Nelson. When he was killed, his body was put into a barrel of rum to preserve it until they could return to Britain. On the journey home, the sailors were sneakily openin gthe tap on the barrel and stealing tots of rum to drink and were said to be 'tapping the Admiral'.

    Sean ;D
     
  10. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Other phrases jumps to mind.............

    Maleesh, meaning "never mind" or "not important"

    Bahdin, meaning "by & by" or "later on, perhaps"

    Ron
     
  11. Wills

    Wills Very Senior Member

    I can hand on heart say I cannot remember a time when my father swore in front of the family and he was not impressed by any of us who did. However, there were times when something unintelligible to us was said, my mother would raise an eyebrow but wisely did not enquire.


    The times I heard 2 - 4 - 6 heave! Hanger doors being shut or opened according to my father. Of course it is suggested it came from the RN gun team numbers pulling the guns back into position.


    Egg banjos
     
  12. Donnie

    Donnie Remembering HHWH

  13. BrianM59

    BrianM59 Senior Member

    I think one of the most gruesome pieces of slang I've heard arose from the murder of a little girl in Hampshire called Fanny Adams. She was killed and dismembered by a lunatic in 1867 and the murder was remembered as particularly gruesome. In 1869, when sailors were first served tinned mutton, they observed that it must be sweet Fanny Adams in the tin. That has passed into common parlance as 'Sweet F.A" but isn't a contraction of F**k All. Apparently the mutton tins and later mess tins were still called 'fannys' in the navy until relatively recently? I certainly remember my uncle using that and many other colourful phrases that my mum disapproved of.
    Fanny Adams' gravestone has become something of a tourist attraction:
    The true story of Sweet Fanny Adams XXX
     
  14. Stormbird

    Stormbird Restless

    I only recently realised that "klick" or "click" - for kilometer - is indeed military slang, not ordinary English.:blush:
    I favour it for being probably the only way to make a US serviceperson think metric!
     
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  15. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    BrianM59

    'SFA' as also a contraction of Scottish Football Association - and was invariably used in polite society - as well as Fanny Adams

    Stormbird
    we also have that problem with the Americans who come up here with their miles - not Kilometers - who think that our speed limit of 100KPH means that they can speed along at 100MPH-
    I have often wondered if they realize that our signs are made up in three languages which
    seem to be foreign to them - e.g - Max = Latin - 100 =Universal - KPH = French

    The sign of Stop/Halt appears to them as an exclamation and NOT an order !

    we now await slipdigit's wrath
    Cheers
     
  16. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Old Hickory Recon

    we now await slipdigit's wrath
    Cheers

    Your comment is not worth the effort, Tom. ;)

    Really, it's not.
     
  17. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Jeff -
    didn't think it would be as I haven't heard from you in a while - so just checking that you are still around- very glad to note that you are still with us
    Cheers- with even warmer regards
     
  18. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Old Hickory Recon

    Never ya worry, I'm still aboot.
     
  19. son of a rat

    son of a rat Senior Member

    Hi there Gringe as dug out / trench. Dad also says Griff talk is what they had before a operation ie going into battle.
     
  20. wowtank

    wowtank Very Senior Member

    Hi there Gringe as dug out / trench. Dad also says Griff talk is what they had before a operation ie going into battle.

    Ty just thought that a Gringe maybe have been a old Suffolk word for a foxes set.
     

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