1842 retreat from Kabul: Captain Robert Salusbury Trevor

Discussion in 'Prewar' started by CL1, May 7, 2019.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Retreat from Kabul 1842
     
  2. Maureene

    Maureene Well-Known Member

    For books available online, including many mentioned previously , see the FIBIS Fibiwiki page 1st Afghan War
    1st Afghan War - FIBIwiki

    Maureen
     
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  3. bexley84

    bexley84 Well-Known Member

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  4. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Looks like there may end up being another Afghanistan related medal for British Forces:

    Medals For Afghanistan Evacuation In Doubt As UK Considers Length Of Mission
     
  5. davidbfpo

    davidbfpo Patron Patron

    William Dalrymple appeared in print last week commenting on the parallels between 1842 and recently: Afghanistan always defeats the West One of the best comments I've read.
     
  6. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Officers Killed - Afghanistan 1838-42

    British Army/Indian Army


    Captain Robert Salusbury TREVOR - 3rd Light Cavalry - Aged 39. Son of Rev. Thomas and Elizabeth Trevor. Born in Chester, 30th December 1802. Husband of Mary Spottiswoode. Posted to Shah Shuja's army and commanded the Hazirbash (King's Life Guards) in 1841. He was taken hostage and assassinated at a Conference in Kabul 23rd December 1841.
    Memorial at St. Mary's church, Eastham, Mersyside - "To the memory of Robert Salusbury Trevor of the 3rd Bengal Cavalry, fifth son of the Rev. Thomas Trevor LLD. Born at Eastham 30th December 1802. Killed at Kabul 23rd December 1841 one of the victims of the treacherous massacre of the British envoy by Akbar Khan in Afghanistan. Also the memory of Mary, his widow, youngest daughter of William Spottiswoode. Born 17th March 1810. Died in London 11th October 1889. She accompanied her husband to Kabul and with her eight children was among the few survivors of the disastrous retreat of the British Army in 1842, who were held captives for ten months. Erected by their five sons and two surviving daughters."

    First Afghan
     
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  7. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

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