147th Essex Yeomanry RA - Battery Identification

Discussion in 'British Army Units - Others' started by Susan A, Jun 1, 2020.

  1. KevinT

    KevinT Senior Member

    Hi Michel,
    I did wonder about the census number as it could be from one of 3 blocks CS172726 - CS172785 or S233626 - S233925 or S233926 - S235061. It was the CS prefix that threw me.

    I checked my census number database and found 2 more numbers:-
    Sexton S233833 B2 - source Tank Action D. Render / S. Tootal
    Sherman V T261633 A Trp.

    Cheers

    Kevin
     
  2. Hello Kevin,

    It looks like the Census Number of the Sherman V has been misread, since (from your excellent table of T-numbers) numbers between T236775 and T261893 inclusive should not be Sherman tanks. Not an exceptional occurrence when we see how difficult it is to accurately interpret the blurry blobs masquerading as census numbers on too many photos. o_O

    By the way, has anyone seen a photo (or written evidence) of the actual EXTERMINATOR S234019?

    So far I have found a single artwork, reproduced ad nauseam on the web with varying captions...

    Michel
     
  3. KevinT

    KevinT Senior Member

    Hi Michel,

    Yes it looks like I might have broken one of my own rules with T261633 I have taken it as read and not checked it through. This number I think was from another post here about either 147th EY or OP tanks on D-Day.

    As to Exterminator I have nothing to confirm as yet.

    Cheers

    Kevin
     
  4. And if there was a 5th Sexton at one time in E Tp, like there apparently was in D Tp, and taking a further step along the gory path, it might have been named EVISCERATOR...

    More variants in the same vein involving the forceful removal of various body parts can also be imagined...

    Michel
     
  5. Expat Yeoman

    Expat Yeoman Member

    I like all the suggestions for the E Troop names, very good! Hopefully we will be able to corroborate those with our collective research.

    I have also gone through the relevent chapters in Gee and:

    1. Alas there was no reference to either of the individuals from earlier in this thread,
    2. There is also no reference to the number of guns per Troop following the conversion to Armour. My gut says four for the reasons I gave above but again still unconfirmed for now.

    M
     
  6. KevinT

    KevinT Senior Member

    Just a thought as to the number of guns per troop. Could it be D5 DOVERCOURT was a reserve brought up into action to replace a knocked out gun? Reason for thought - according to the British Military Markings 1939 - 1945 Hodges/Taylor in a Field Regiment Battery there were 2 spare tractor and trailers and I assume guns per troop.

    Cheers

    Kevin
     
  7. Expat Yeoman

    Expat Yeoman Member

    Kevin I think that is an excellent and elegant hypothesis and it gets my vote, especially as the style of stencil for D5 looks markedly different to the 1-4 examples (of all troops).
     
  8. peter.t

    peter.t Member

    My Mother in Law showed me a letter that her Dad Alfred Donno wrote during the war, I transcribed it exactly as Alfred had written it, she believes this was the only letter she has. My Mother in Law was born May 1944 and Alfred was given special leave to she her as he was stationed in Brockenhurst prior to D-Day. 324E8720-3880-4E49-B917-CA04BAB97AAB.jpeg 4FB91C48-6500-45C4-AD61-5261B6632EEC.jpeg 1E39204A-BDB6-47EB-8761-79D195B4C5BA.jpeg
     
  9. Susan A

    Susan A Member

    peter.t

    How nice for your MiL to have that letter to remember her father by and thank you for sharing. It’s interesting to read a soldier’s perspective of what was happening.
    I hope your research into your GFiL is going well.

    Regards
    Susan
     
  10. peter.t

    peter.t Member

    Hopefully we may find more letters from my Mother in Law one day, it seems strange that there was just this one letter found.
     
  11. Hi Susan,

    I think this part reads:
    "149/44 | 150 LAA Regt | Passed Trade Test for Driver ["Mech" crossed out] Operator Group C Class III at Stubbington and mustered with effect from 19/6/44. Authority – RA(LAA) Rec[ord?]s Reference LAA/HQ/ADMIN/TRADE/161 dated 31/7/44 | UK | Gunner | 19/6/44"
    TT Dvr Op.jpeg

    This is confirmed by his "Notification of Impending Release - Page Three" which fully spells out the text:
    "(b) Trade courses and trade tests passed .. Driver Operator Group C Class III on 19 June 1944
    (c) Service Trade ............Driver Operator Group C Class III"

    Notification of Impending Release - Page Three - Trade.jpeg

    Michel
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2020
  12. Susan A

    Susan A Member

    Michel,

    Thanks for your help. I’m gradually putting together my grandfather's war record piece by piece. At first, I really didn’t have a clue regarding what I was looking at, but I’m gradually getting there (with a lot of help from this site and a lot of reading).

    I’m very grateful, Susan.
     
  13. Sherbet

    Sherbet Junior Member

    Hello Susan,

    Did you manage to find out the battery/troop of your Grandfather? I have a picture of 431 D troop, maybe you can spot him in it.

    Regards,

    Steven
     
  14. Sherbet

    Sherbet Junior Member

    By the way, my grandfather also talked about being at a concentration camp
     
    Michel Sabarly likes this.
  15. Susan A

    Susan A Member

    Hi Steven,

    Thanks for taking the time to respond to me.
    Sadly I haven’t yet tracked down my grandfather’s battery but I would love to see a photo of 431D troop - you never know - thank you.
    Interesting about the concentration camps though - I can’t find any mention of them in the regiment’s war diary (maybe I’ve not looked deeply enough). In his book One Man’s War, Ron Davies (also 431 battery) talks about liberating a slave labour camp and entering Belsen.

    Regards,
    Susan
     
  16. Susan A

    Susan A Member

    Steven,

    Please ignore my comment about Mr Davies being in 431 battery - it was actually 413

    Regards,
    Susan
     
  17. Sherbet

    Sherbet Junior Member

    Hello Susan,

    The concentration camp which my Grandfather mentioned (to my mum) was indeed Belsen.

    Particular 147th batteries could attach themselves to armored divisions (or even commando units as with 413 at Port en Bessin) if and when needed, so it can be rather difficult to keep track of their movements across Europe.

    Here is the photograph. It has been buried in my inbox for years....
     

    Attached Files:

  18. Sherbet

    Sherbet Junior Member

    ...Usually, 147th batteries acted as artillery support for regiments within the 8th armored brigade
     
  19. Susan A

    Susan A Member

    Hi Steven,
    Thanks for the photo, sadly I can’t see my grandfather but at least that potentially narrows me down to 413 or 511.
    Yes, my mum recalls my grandfather mentioning 8th armoured brigade when he did (rarely) talk about his time in the war.

    Regards
    Susan
     

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