Your most special CWGC Cemetery is?

Discussion in 'War Grave Photographs' started by Jonathan Ball, Mar 17, 2011.

  1. Jonathan Ball

    Jonathan Ball It's a way of life.

    I've always had an interest in the CWGC cemeteries and memorials with regards to the architecture and design and I have visited quite a few. What is your favourite and why? A photo of it would be nice to see.

    Thanks

    Jonathan
     
  2. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Jonathan

    You ask which is my "favourite" ?

    I am always impressed at the level of expertise shown by some of the contributors to this forum with regard to CWGC cemeteries around the world.

    Of course it does not stop there, knowledge is one thing, sheer hard work is another and one only has to look at the many threads on the subject that have been posted here purely to help those who have family members who have been laid to rest in these most admirable of places.

    I would also beg everyone's indulgence if I thank here those many ww2talk members who have supplied me with photos & details of headstones with the Star of David sign.

    As someone who moved around a fair bit during my wartime career I am a relative novice when it comes to CWGC cemeteries but I would not have missed returning to Monte Cassino for all the money in the world.

    My story about the visit, oft told, is here:
    BBC - WW2 People's War - Return to Cassino

    Ron
     
  3. RemeDesertRat

    RemeDesertRat Very Senior Member

    It would have to be Aldershot as my Uncle is buried there. No piccie though.
     
  4. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    I have to say Rangoon War Cemetery, because my Grandad is there and it is therefore not just a beautiful setting but also heaped in emotion.

    The larger cemetery in Rangoon is called Taukkyan, this is kept immaculatly and is a credit to its curator and his staff.

    Tyne Cot took my breath away when I first saw the full panorama from the memorial walls looking out over the countryside beyond. I remember searching out a few individual graves that day, but eventually being overcome emotionally when I saw row upon row of Australian graves in the centre of the site.

    It's strange what gets to you in the end when you visit these amazing places.

    Attached is the Rangoon Memorial at Taukkyan and a longview of RWC taken in 2008.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Peter Clare

    Peter Clare Very Senior Member

    It has to be The Air Forces Memorial, Runnymede. My father is commemorated on panel 80 and I attend the service each November. I was there when it was first dedicated in 1953 and again for the 50th anniversary re-dedication in 2003.
     

    Attached Files:

    James S likes this.
  6. Buteman

    Buteman 336/102 LAA Regiment (7 Lincolns), RA

    Jonathan Ball likes this.
  7. At Home Dad (Returning)

    At Home Dad (Returning) Well-Known Member

    Loos British, where my GtGrandad is buried
    alongside a few other West Ham Battalion

    The only one I've visited so far
     
  8. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    With living in Berlin and being a very frequent visitor to the CWGC on Heerstrasse, it has to be my current favourite.

    Having said that I have visited quite a few CWGC over the years and each one has a special feeling when you step inside the gates.

    The common denominator's are the same names and the young ages of those who sacrificed their lives to defend Freedom and Liberty for us.

    Regards
    Tom
     
  9. James S

    James S Very Senior Member

    Nes in Ameland as my father's brother is buried there, I have been over there twice and often feel that had the American and German aircrew who were buried there had been left alone their relatives would have found them receiving the same care as do the Commonwealth War dead.

    [​IMG]

    Irvinestown in County Fermanagh - both the C of I plot and the small plot in the adjacent Chapel graveyard.

    Unfortunately the Cemetery at Osaka where my father's other brother is buried I know only through photographs.
     

    Attached Files:

    Jonathan Ball likes this.
  10. WhiskeyGolf

    WhiskeyGolf Senior Member

    No particular favourite as I have family buried in several different cemeteries around the world. To me they are all special, they all hold precious memories, and they all command respect.
    WG
     
  11. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Has to be Coriano Ridge as some of my troop are buried there along with too many of our brigade- second has to be Cassino- Stan Scislowski's description of his visit in his "Return to Cassino" should be read by all to get the feelings of many of us who served in Italy- unforgettable.....
    Return to Cassino
    Cheers
     
  12. Jonathan Ball

    Jonathan Ball It's a way of life.

    There are some nice photos here and thank you for sharing them. I'd like to say that I wish I had written 'most poignant' as opposed to 'favourite' at the beginning. I've yet to visit a World War 2 cemetery which is an oversight that will be corrected next week in Normandy. I would agree that they are all special but the memorial that stands out for me is that at Thiepval. As for a cemetery it is probably The Connaught Cemetery at the edge of Thiepval Wood. It was just so quiet and still and very atmospheric.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Jonathan Ball

    Jonathan Ball It's a way of life.

    Tyne Cot took my breath away when I first saw the full panorama from the memorial walls looking out over the countryside beyond. I remember searching out a few individual graves that day, but eventually being overcome emotionally when I saw row upon row of Australian graves in the centre of the site..

    Indeed it does take the breath away..

    [​IMG]
     
    James S likes this.
  14. Jonathan Ball

    Jonathan Ball It's a way of life.

    Has to be Coriano Ridge as some of my troop are buried there along with too many of our brigade- second has to be Cassino- Stan Scislowski's description of his visit in his "Return to Cassino" should be read by all to get the feelings of many of us who served in Italy- unforgettable.....
    Return to Cassino
    Cheers

    Looks absolutely immaculate. A superb tribute to the men there and those who tend to them now..

    [​IMG]
     
  15. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Indeed it does take the breath away..

    [​IMG]


    Thanks Jonathan.
     
  16. -tmm-

    -tmm- Senior Member

    Dud Corner cemetery near Loos. Small, remote and peaceful - and hold special meaning for me.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Whilst in Burma in 2008 I was asked by the RBL representative if I would like to say a few words in a short ceremony at Rangoon War Cemetery. At first I felt totally daunted by the thought of doing so, but I finally decided that I had be given an opportunity to thank my Grandad and his comrades and to remember not just them but all their wives and family members too. My Nan, like so many women back then were left to pick up the pieces and bring up young families on their own.

    A very emotional day, but one that will stay with me forever.
     

    Attached Files:

  18. martin14

    martin14 Senior Member

    Has to be Coriano Ridge as some of my troop are buried there along with too many of our brigade- second has to be Cassino- Stan Scislowski's description of his visit in his "Return to Cassino" should be read by all to get the feelings of many of us who served in Italy- unforgettable.....
    Return to Cassino
    Cheers

    Took my breath away when I saw it, even in December.

    Don't really have a favorite, Beny sur Mers in Normandy was the first Cemetery
    I visited, when I saw all those Canadian headstones.. well, it still makes me..

    Others were interesting as well. Milan is my closest one, beside San Siro football stadium.
    The one in Marseilles, with the water features, but sadly located in what is now a very bad part of town.
    Genova, with its stepped plots carved into a mountain, well kept but mostly forgotten, and a real quest to find if you dont know exactly where it is.
    Udine, where the whole area around has been developed, except for this quiet oasis.
    Only place I ever felt uncomfortable was Klagenfurt, in Austria. Don't know why, but I don't like it.

    The ones that make me sad are the individual graves I have seen, there
    are 3 young men in 3 town Cemeteries in the mountains outside Turin.
    How they got there or died there, I will never know.

    But they are there, alone.

    At least in the CWGC Cemeteries, the young men have their friends and brothers for comfort while they sleep.

    Many more still to visit, though.
     
  19. Enigma1003

    Enigma1003 Member

    For me, it has to be Sai Wan on Hong Kong, due to the story that goes with it.
    The POWs from Formosa (Taiwan) , particularly those who died of starvation and cruelty at the Kinkaseki copper mine, were all reburied here after the war. The bodies had previously been buried in Formosa in a few inches of soil upon rock, and the heavy rains used to uncover them daily.
    After visiting the copper mines in Taiwan, amongst the gloom and rain of a November day, and then flying to Hong Kong to visit this site, it was indeed as if they had been moved from Hell back to Heaven.
    .
    .
    [​IMG]
     
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  20. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Enigma,

    That is simply fantastic!!! Three of my Chindit 1 boys are in there, what a place to be at rest.

    Steve.
     

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