Your favourite piece of War Art.

Discussion in 'General' started by Owen, Jul 12, 2006.

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  1. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Plenty of pieces of War Art to choose from out there.
    What's yours?
     
  2. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

  3. Marina

    Marina Senior Member

    Very striking and powerful sketches, Owen. The attached is a favourite of mine.

    Marina
     
  4. David Layne

    David Layne Well-Known Member

    I like this one by Terry Shelbourne. I commissioned him to paint my Father's aircraft and it now hangs on my study wall.
     
  5. Erich

    Erich Senior Member

    Eagle Editions Ta 152 Stabschwarm with Will Reschke and Walter Loos signed. The JG 301 unit has a special place in my heart due to a cousin serving in 5th staffel in the fall of 44, KIA on 26 November 1944

    Aufname aus !
     
  6. Herroberst

    Herroberst Senior Member

    Gassed, Sargent
     
  7. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Gassed, Sargent
    I agree with you on that one. It's hanging in the IWM, London. Very powerful painting. How many people have noticed the football match being played it the background? The injured and damaged men in the forground but then the fit and healthy behind. It made me think the gassed men were once like those football players and how long would it be before they join the ranks of the wounded or dead.
    Picture here.
     
  8. Kitty

    Kitty Very Senior Member

    Anythign by Robert Taylor, particularly his aircraft paintings, but also his submarines. I saw a beautiful one of HMS/m Seneschal he had done once as she was leading an X Craft out of harbour. I can't find it now, so if anyone else comes across a picture let me know.
     
  9. Herroberst

    Herroberst Senior Member

    I agree with you on that one. It's hanging in the IWM, London. Very powerful painting. How many people have noticed the football match being played it the background? The injured and damaged men in the forground but then the fit and healthy behind. It made me think the gassed men were once like those football players and how long would it be before they join the ranks of the wounded or dead.
    Picture here.

    My wife's grandfather was gassed in WWI received the purple heart. It's close to home.
     
  10. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor

    I like the aviation art myself best, here are a few of my favourites.
     
  11. 52nd Airborne

    52nd Airborne Green Jacket Brat

    I'm a small time collector of aviation art and I have few prints stored flat (Mainly Nicolas Trudgian).

    As a big fan of the Dambusters, I have 11 framed prints hanging in the Hall, Stairs and landing - 2 x Gerald Coulson, 2 x Nicolas Trudgian, 3 x Simon Smith, 3 x Robert Taylor and 1 x Simon Atack.
     
  12. Gerry Chester

    Gerry Chester WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Other than of the many war posters that were created going back to the Great War, WW II art is a relatively new interest of mine. t was triggered off as explained in:
    http://www.nih.ww2site.com/nih/Art/Comfort.html
    Haven't chosen a favourite artist as yet though. I

    Posted something similar in you know where - hopefully the repetition may be forgiven.
     
  13. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Gerry,
    Saw this at the IWM back in May.
    It is a fantasic painting.
    Made me think of you as I was stood in front of it.
     
  14. Gage

    Gage The Battle of Barking Creek MOD

    Robert Taylor is my fav artist by far. His books, although expensive, are fantastic. I also like Coulson and Woolton.
     
  15. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

  16. ZenZen

    ZenZen Junior Member

    I suppose I dont really have a favorite piece of war art, but one momento of the Great War did strike a nerve with me and that was The Anzac book - Written and illustrated in Gallipoli by the men of Anzac (written at Gallipoli in 1915)

    Simple yet comical sketches and drawings from such a hell hole of a place.

    I have found a site where there has been a total reproduction of the book online, which the characters from the Dardenelles, if any of you wnat to see the sketches, one I have listed below entitled "Kitch"

    The Anzac Book edited by CEW Bean Gallipoli 1915


    [​IMG]

    Hope you found the link interesting.

    ZenZen
     
  17. lancesergeant

    lancesergeant Senior Member

    Some cracking pictures, has anyone got any cartoons to put on the post or would it be worth opening a post just for cartoons if it warrants it.
     
  18. Kitty

    Kitty Very Senior Member

    I think a new thread for cartoons/posters/nose art etc would be good, to keep the lighthearted seperate from the more serious/graphic work. I'll set it up now.
     
  19. Andy in West Oz

    Andy in West Oz Senior Member

    I agree with you on that one. It's hanging in the IWM, London. Very powerful painting. How many people have noticed the football match being played it the background? The injured and damaged men in the forground but then the fit and healthy behind. It made me think the gassed men were once like those football players and how long would it be before they join the ranks of the wounded or dead.
    Picture here.

    Wow, powerful painting.
     
  20. Salvage Sailor

    Salvage Sailor Junior Member

    Aloha Everyone,

    One painting that I've always admired is The Battle for Fox Green Beach, D-Day Normandy
    Dwight C. Shepler #146
    Oil on canvas, 1944
    88-199-ET

    From the US Naval Historical Section: American forces fought all day for this stretch of Omaha beachhead. Its benign green bluffs and valley entrance were a maze of crossfire from enfilading (positioned to fire down the length of the beach) German guns. These included 88’s (a high-velocity 88mm anti-aircraft artillery piece which was used with devastating effect on Allied armored vehicles), mortars (small shell-launchers which fired at a high angle to clear hills and other obstacles), and machineguns. All of these, plus infantry rifle fire, raked the beaches and pinned the infantry to a small area before the expertly designed and deadly minefields.

    By mid-afternoon disabled landing craft were clogging the few gaps in the beach obstacles, while under a rain of short and long-range artillery fire, support waves circled and jockeyed for an opening. Destroyers moved toward the beach into dangerous shoal waters to pump salvos of five-inch shells into stubborn German emplacements and mobile targets of opportunity.

    The house in the valley and the spire of Colleville-Sur-Mer on the Hill were landmarks of Fox Green Beach. Germans used the spire for an artillery control tower, with spotters able to see the full panorama of the American forces and direct artillery fire at opportune targets. The church’s lovely renaissance architecture crumbled into sad rubble when a U.S. fire-control party on the beach called on the destroyer U.S.S. Emmons to demolish it. The artist was serving as an identification officer aboard that ship. This was the beach which Hemingway described in his article "Voyage to Victory."
     

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