WW2 Phonetic Alphabet.

Discussion in 'General' started by Owen, Apr 7, 2006.

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  1. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Richard

    Super !......... But what's with the spelling of the figures ?

    Owe ?

    Foer & Fife ?

    Ate & Niner ?

    Explanation please !

    Ron
     
  2. Richard Lewis

    Richard Lewis Member

    Ron,

    I was taught to pronounce 0 as "Zero" not "Owe"!
    Attached are a couple of pages from "Signal Training (All Arms) 1938" which explains it a bit better. This manual even includes a section on using carrier pigeons!

    Richard
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    Richard

    Super !......... But what's with the spelling of the figures ?

    Owe ?

    Foer & Fife ?

    Ate & Niner ?

    Explanation please !

    Ron


    Ron,

    It is all about pronounciation over the air and using words that are readily understood to prevent any confusion.

    The Phoenetic alphabet is used throughout the world, especially for aircraft control and the military.

    I have a 1952 version of the Seaman's Pocketbook (I was a sea cadet) and the current phonetic alphabet is shown with morse and semaphore.

    I learned the phonetic alphabet as part of our training.
    It also came in handy when I later joined the Police as I did not need to learn it like most of the other recruits :).

    Regards
    Tom
     
  4. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Bumping this thread because of a news announcement today about a 999 call operator who was sacked for being un-professional whilst laughing at a caller's mis-use of the phonetic alphabet.

    It's over 71 years since I first learn't this alphabet but I still use it when trying to clarify words I have just used in a phone call.

    It doesn't always work !

    Last week I was speaking to a BT Vision call centre in Mumbai and spent some time trying to get the chap at the other end to understand what D for Don had to do with the problems he was trying to solve :)

    Ron
     
  5. Joe Brown

    Joe Brown WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Richard:

    Wonderful for an old signaller to see these signalling codes.

    However, here is my 'P' for 'Pip's' worth of an old infantry signaller: See My War Memoirs page 39.

    AR [dot dash dot dash dot] . . . end of message.

    Joe
     

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