WW2 History in schools?

Discussion in 'Historiography' started by 17thDYRCH, Sep 15, 2010.

  1. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Nevil
    Couldn't agree more
    Cheers
     
  2. Nevil

    Nevil WW2 Veteran/Royal Signals WW2 Veteran

    Nevil
    Couldn't agree more
    Cheers

    Thanks, Tom......Greetings to you in Lotus Land.

    Quite a change from the turmoil of 39-45!

    Nevil.
     
  3. Nevil

    Nevil WW2 Veteran/Royal Signals WW2 Veteran

    Thanks Wills for a comprehensive and interesting description of the build-up (or rather lack of it I suppose) to September 1939.

    I especially like your summation (quote):” Some see criticism as being disloyal, others see war history as the UK and all the bit part players. History as Churchill pointed out is kinder to those who write it.”

    Regards,

    Nevil.
     
  4. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Nevil
    Careful - Lotus Land is generally assumed to be California whereas B.C. is regarded as Shangri -La- hopefully this is a true thought as I would love to live long enough to get all my money back from governments but with the frozen Brit pension there is little chance !
    Cheers
     
  5. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    Nevil
    Careful - Lotus Land is generally assumed to be California whereas B.C. is regarded as Shangri -La- hopefully this is a true thought as I would love to live long enough to get all my money back from governments but with the frozen Brit pension there is little chance !
    Cheers

    Tom
    We call it the LEFT COAST.
     
  6. Nevil

    Nevil WW2 Veteran/Royal Signals WW2 Veteran

    Nevil
    Careful - Lotus Land is generally assumed to be California whereas B.C. is regarded as Shangri -La- hopefully this is a true thought as I would love to live long enough to get all my money back from governments but with the frozen Brit pension there is little chance !
    Cheers

    Oh heck, Tom! Don't expect to see that in our lifetime. Old Rudyard had it about right:

    For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, wait outside";
    But it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide,
    The troopship's on the tide, my boys, the troopship's on the tide,
    O it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide. :D

    Nevil.
     
  7. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Tim/ Nevil
    You both have it about right - still it's way ahead of Ontario- although driving down the Don Mills parkway every morning in spring is a big lift to see the buds on Monday and full blossom on Fridays
    Cheers
     
  8. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    Tim/ Nevil
    You both have it about right - still it's way ahead of Ontario- although driving down the Don Mills parkway every morning in spring is a big lift to see the buds on Monday and full blossom on Fridays
    Cheers

    Tom,

    The Parkway is so slow and congested these days that you can now see the buds transform to full blossoms, all on the same trip!:lol:
     
  9. hr nz

    hr nz Junior Member

    Hi all,

    It has been an interesting read in this thread and it seems a good place to make my first post on this site.

    I am now 36 and its probably only in the last 10 years that I developed any real knowledge of WW2. I don't recall learning anything on the subject at school. In my early years of school, history focused more on the colonization on New Zealand and the ancient world and not on war topics and by the time history was a dedicated class where WW2 may have been covered (not sure on this point) it was optional and not of interest to me.

    The catalyst of change for me was watching Saving Private Ryan and then Band of Brothers. I appreciate that these titles are a Hollywood reenactment, may not have been factually accurate and to some may glorify the war, but for me it got me thinking and reading and learning and ultimately lead me here.

    As a Dad to three kids I feel it is important that they have an understanding of WW2. It is such a huge event in human history it simply should not be ignored. I think it should be covered in the school curriculum, but as a parent I will be taking the responsiblity for educating my kids when they are ready.

    Regards
    John
     
    James S likes this.
  10. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    Welcome aboard John.
    You've made a damn good start with that post. There is a thread where various members have described, at whatever age, what got them interested in ww2. It really doesn't matter how, as long as you've arrived!

    Cheers
    Tim
     
  11. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    John
    you can't do any worse than follow your own 2nd Division from the Desert to Trieste and learn of their sufferings in two battles at Cassino where one Kiwi asked of a member of my regiment " why do you think they call us Kiwi's" there was no answer and so he went on - "we cannot see - we cannot fly - and we are fast becoming extinct up here"

    The New Zealand Government has one of the better analysis of all operations that I have seen so far of WW2 and it would do well as abasis of any instruction for youngsters of all ages ...here is alink to that wiork

    22 Battalion | NZETC
     
  12. hr nz

    hr nz Junior Member

    Thank you guys. Tom, that link looks like a very interesting read. I'm just starting to focus more on New Zealand history. I'm reading Crete by Antony Beevor at the moment and starting to delve into my family history. My Grandfather served on a fairmile and patrolled around the islands.

    This thread had me thinking and last night at dinner I asked the family a bit about WW2. My oldest son whose 8 knew nothing and to be honest I am happy it stays this way for a few more years. I think its enough for him to attend the dawn service and understand that soldiers fought to protect our country at this stage without going into more detail.

    I was a little surprised about my wifes knowledge. She did know the duration of WW2 but thought the Soviets sided with Germany and Japan suffered the most casualties. Her reason for not being interested is that its too depressing. I will have to educate her along with the kids!
     
  13. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    John -
    If your wife can snap on to just one factor of that conflict she will be bitten to study some more and she will then be able to teach the children around the dining table which is still a way ahead of the classroom as they listen to "Mom" - for a while yet anyway ..
    Cheers
     
  14. pauldawn

    pauldawn Senior Member

    A few weeks ago i started a thread questioning the teaching of ww1 and ww2 history in our schools.

    I was genuinely concerned at what i thought was a lack of education. However ... today I was presented by a piece of homework my 12 year old son has had to produce recently.

    It is a poem done in his English Lit lesson. Granted some words and even some phrases have been taken from other sources but even with that in mind i am surprised at what hes produced. please read below: (bear in mind he is only 12)


    Gas Attack

    Quick boys quick, no time for rest.
    You'll die in all your glory, we'll put you to the test.
    This is no dream, it's happening face to face,
    the white devil is coming, put on those gas masks, make haste
    Don't stand there yelling, watching the vile curse,
    it will haunt you.
    The dim green light hanging,
    in the flames, that levitate above you,
    making your lungs tear.
    The sea of choking children a vision in your head,
    but if we don't leave now you'll be dead.
    The distant doubles of the hun in your eyes,
    friends are helpless to you, no breath?
    Here come the cries.
    So run ahead of all other men, don't be lost behind,
    your innocent soul, ardent and fitting in your final sign.
    Gas masks on, a misty dusk,
    and desperate hearts that counter souls is a must,
    and and your entire safety is a must.
    Escape the clumsy jolts.
    Clear air, clear sights, far from the gas dropping off to sleep.
    If you survive to tell the tale,
    you'll be lucky to say the least.
     
    Za Rodinu likes this.
  15. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    12 years old???
     
  16. pauldawn

    pauldawn Senior Member

    yeap only 12!
     
  17. Jonathan Ball

    Jonathan Ball It's a way of life.

    Your son has obviously read and absorbed Wilfred Owen's Dulce et Decorum Est

    Excellent.
     
  18. Oldman

    Oldman Very Senior Member

    Pauldawn

    We always bemoan the fact that teaching is not what it was when we where at school.

    Then like a bolt out of the blue you get a result like your son has produced

    Excellent poem to read
     
  19. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    It is refreshing to see such work, especially from one so young.

    Excellent and bodes well for the future.

    Regards
    Tom
     
  20. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    Really realy good mate. I'm impressed.
     

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