Woman of WW2 - Chilwell, Nottinghamshire

Discussion in 'The Women of WW2' started by Pte Morrison, Aug 31, 2017.

  1. Pte Morrison

    Pte Morrison Member

    Found these photos of my Great Auntie Peggy during WW2, whom I know was a seargant based at Chilwell in Nottinghamshire. Her full name was Margaret Ann Lobban but I have no idea of her military number or what regiment she served with. Does anyone on here have any ideas on this? I believe that there were was a munitions factory based there in WW1, did this still exists in WW2?

    She is sitting third from the right on the bottom row in the group photo and is sitting immediately left of the pillar on the random group photo. I love the random group photo as no one is really posing and the picture is so natural.

    Thanks
    Ian
     

    Attached Files:

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  2. minden1759

    minden1759 Senior Member

    Ian.

    The informal photo looks like it is taken in the WOs' and Sgts' Mess. The Regt Sgt Maj is seating on the right of the picture.

    Chilwell was an enormous munitions factory in the Great War and is the site of an enormous explosion which killed a lot of the workforce. I think that it was the same in the Second War. After the war, it was an Armoured Vehicle Workshop and Storage Area.

    Regards

    Frank
     
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  3. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

  4. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

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  5. dbateson

    dbateson Junior Member

    Hi Ian

    I know from ATS records that a good friend of my late father in-law, Private Margaret E. Denys-Burton, nickname 'Gypsy' was posted to Chiwell in 1941 and spend quite a period of time there. Have you by any chance come across her in your aunt's documents? Margaret was born in Ireland, her father was a baronet, Sir Charles Peter Denys-Burton.

    Thanks. db
     
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  6. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    Hi db, unfortunately the envelope addressed to my aunt was the only document we had. I do have more photos which I'll add to the thread I put the link to later today.

    Edit: Ian, I've uploaded all the photographs I have along with the notes she had written on the back. There were two Margaret's mentioned. All I know is she was at Chilwell from the envelope, Preston from locating a stationery shop in the background and I think it was a Derby newspaper that mentioned her in a news article. Having no service record I consider myself lucky I've manage to find out this much!
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2017
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  7. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    Ian and DB, here are some of the responses I received from facebook when I posted pictures of the barracks
    Naomis Barracks.jpg
    1. The long BLDG is definitely what is now BLDG 102 I work in that now. All the ATS girls lived in the BLDG. it sits on a hill and has good views for miles around.
    The BLDG was called Williams Bks after Major General Leslie Williams who opened the vehicle and stores depot in the mid 1930s. Chilwell was known as Chilwell Depot for many years.
    The area BLDG 102 sits in became Queen Elizabeth camp after King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited on 3rd March 1943.

    2. The building is still there in what is now called Chetwynd Barracks. It was home to the ATS girls during the Second World War. Part of the Barracks was named Queen Elizabeth camp after a royal visit. It's a mixture of accommodation and offices for the Royal Engineers now.

    3. The Beeston Historical society might also be interested in your photos. There is a book called The Chilwell Story 1915 to 1982 by MJ Haslam which details the many functions of the ATS and another called ' No Time for Tears' by Margaret Sherman who was in the ATS at Chilwell during WWII driving in the convoys delivering stores and supplies.

    I've searched the libraries for a copy of the Margaret Sherman book and can't see it. I have traced copies on Abebooks and have encouraged my aunts daughter in Seattle to try and get a hold of a copy so she can read for herself what her Mum might have been getting up to 1943-46. The only copy I could see on Amazon is coming in at £35.

    No Time for Tears by Margaret Sherman - AbeBooks
     
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  8. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

  9. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter Patron 1940 Obsessive

  10. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    Thanks for the links TD & Rich. The Christmas book list is getting longer by the day.
     
  11. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    You might not have days - the link shows that shop only has one copy to sell - so perhaps it need buying now and storing for Xmas :ninja:

    TD
     
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  12. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    No TD, if I buy now I know exactly what will happen and I've just start stripping wallpaper (regretting it already!). Besides, my sister is coming up in Oct and wanted to treat me to a spa day (just not my scene), but I've convinced her to go to the National Archives in Edinburgh instead. Need to get all the files I want to look at ordered in advance.
     
  13. Pte Morrison

    Pte Morrison Member

    AD45,

    I have found several used lower cost options of 'No Time for Tears' by Margaret Sherman at the following website for anyone that is interested:

    No Time for Tears by Sherman Margaret - AbeBooks

    Do you know exactley what the book is about as I would be interested if t had any relation to my Great Aunt?

    Thanks
    Ian
     
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  14. Pte Morrison

    Pte Morrison Member

    Sorry AD45 where did you post the photos as I can't seen to find then.

    Regards
    Ian
     
  15. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    Evening Ian, I'll need to correct the link in the morning, but if you type Naomi Perera in the search field, top right, it should bring up the link. Sorry about that.

    I believe the no time for tears book is just about Margaret's experience at Chilwell with the ATS. I think it will be worth a read, but so does the book Rich linked to. There's never enough time to fit in all the books I'd like to read. But as Tricky pointed out, its unlikely to be reprinted.

    They were super photos you posted. If that Beeston local historian gets in touch, are you interested in passing on your photos too?
     

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