Who or what is N.S.H. in Oslo 1945

Discussion in 'Weapons, Technology & Equipment' started by IBman, Jan 10, 2020.

  1. IBman

    IBman Member

  2. JimHerriot

    JimHerriot Ready for Anything

    Hello IBman.

    The N.S.H. stamp in your photo most likely stands for "Nasjonal Samling" (NS/NSH). Nasjonal Samling, abbreviated NS, was a fascist party in Norway that was active in Norway from 1933 to 1945, founded I think by Vidkun Quisling. And like the Nazi party, they were prone to putting their stamp (literally) on everything when they were in charge.

    The English language lettering on the box(es?) looks to have been added after the N.S.H. lettering. Make do and mend/re-use of the boxes methinks.

    Example of one of their postage stamps below.

    NSH Stamp.jpg

    Happy to stand corrected by the Norwegian specialist folks on here.

    Kind regards, always,

    Jim.
     
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  3. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    Quisling - Wikipedia

    is a term originating in Norway, which is used in Scandinavian languages and in English for a person who collaborates with an enemy occupying force – or more generally as a synonym for traitor

    Quisling - Wikipedia

    TD
     
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  4. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    Vidkun Quisling. Formed a collaborationist government during the occupation of Norway. After the war the Norwegians changed the law re capital punishment in order to hang him.
     
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  5. IBman

    IBman Member

    Thanks Jim,

    NS not on my mind at all, my focus have 100% been on the english lettering.
    N.S.H. = Nasjonal Samling Hjelpeorganisasjon it may be.
    --
    Med venlig hilsen
    Ivar
     
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  6. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    Delay detonators with copper leads would be used in the quarrying and mining sector. A number of British companies were (and still are) working in Scandinavia after the war and as a previous poster has pointed out capable of reusing boxes as many different companies did for years after the war. (I remember back in the late 60s early 70s Rolls Royce was still using British munition boxes to transport computer tapes between computer sites. There was a hairy moment transporting some to the factory in Dundonald and an army patrol discovered the car boot was full of munition boxes.) The boxes in the photos appear well made with nicely mortised joints and likely to be recycled. I would imagine they belonged either to a British company with an outlet based in Oslo supplying the Norwegian industry or a British mineral extraction company working in Norway. Given the Made in Britain lettering I'd suspect the former
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2020
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  7. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    Not so. In 1905 the Norwegians abolished the death penalty for civilian crimes but retained it for military crimes in wartime. It was during the war in 1941/2 that the Norwegian government-in-exile reintroduced capital punishment for civilian crimes such as treason.
    Quisling was not hanged. He was executed by firing squad.

    Tim
     
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  8. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    I know its Wiki but in this case it works - confirming Tims post above

    Vidkun Quisling - Wikipedia

    The court process was judged to be "a model of fairness" in a commentary by author Maynard Cohen.[138] After giving testimony in a number of other trials of Nasjonal Samling members, Quisling was executed by firing squad at Akershus Fortress at 02:40 on 24 October 1945

    TD
     
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  9. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    According to the US Department of Justice accounts of the war trials it was still necessary to pass a provisional amendment to the Norwegian constitution and this was done after the end of the war. Probably when a full sitting of the Norwegian parliament was possible.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2020
  10. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    I never said there wasnt amendments to the Norwegian constitution, although I have to say not sure what the USA was doing trying to stick its fingers into another countries constitution - not the sort of thing that would happen today of course

    TD
     
  11. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    They merely reported all the trials and the legal proceedings which is not sticking ones finger in anything. The reports are very detailed and a valuable English language resource
     
  12. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    I have studied the Law Reports of Trials of War Criminals by the United Nations War Crimes Commission published by HMSO. Annex 1 goes into Norwegian Law and it would appear that the Provisional Decrees of 1945/6 relate to the prosecution of Foreign War Criminals committing offences under International Law against Norway or Norwegion nationals or interests. Since Quisling was a Norwegian national these Decrees would not have been necessary for his prosecution for treason and murder, which were offences under Norwegian law. I cannot find the report by the US Department of Justice that you refer to and would be grateful if you could say where this may be found.

    Tim
     
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  13. alieneyes

    alieneyes Senior Member

  14. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    Thanks but sorry no. That is the United Nations Report that I was referring to earlier. I'm looking for an account by the US Dept of Justice that Robert-w referred to.

    Tim
     
  15. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    The United Nations publication I referred to is quite clear that the trial reports they cited and the copious notes on Norwegian law were provided by the Norwegians. Lack of a response as to the source of your statements makes them appear inaccurate and your answer to TD's question incorrect.

    Tim
     
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  16. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    I was quite clear as to my source which was the US Dept of Justice. I see no need to respond to bullying
     
  17. alieneyes

    alieneyes Senior Member

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  18. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    Where's the bullying? I merely wanted to compare my source against yours. To say you quoted the US Dept of Justice as a source is ridiculous. Why bother anymore, in future we might as well claim sources as the War Office, the Admiralty, the National Archives etc. and not take the trouble to be more specific.

    Tim
     
  19. Kenneth nø

    Kenneth nø Member

     
  20. Kenneth nø

    Kenneth nø Member

    Yes it was Vidkun Quisling,NS was Nasional Samling.. They were thru an election right before the war and got moore or less no votes at all.. But when the Germans came he was fast to contact Berlin and offered alianse. He wanted Norway to be allied with Germany but with its own gouverment. The fresh'ly elected gouverment called Nygårdsvoll-regjeringen said no to surrender or co operation and went to England. In this "vacuum" he made a deal with Hitler,Hitler had never heard of this guy but he took a chanse on him. Quisling ment he did a good thing becase Norway then was not controlled by Germany,this never happend,he worked for it,but Terbofhen never gave him any real power. Quisling always thought he was a good guy for trying to keep Norway under its own gouverment. He really thought that and was very surprised to get death penalty,. He expected to go free and live after the war ass a priest actually.. Why he's so known for it, is most becase of the election where he got absolut no votes right before the war,then jumpd in and took power by going to the Germans,when king and gouverment went to England. And so NS was formed and stayd but they never got any real power,Berlin was the leader of Norway and Quisling was a puppet only on paper..
     

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