Where were you 15/02/1971 ?

Discussion in 'The Barracks' started by geoff501, Feb 5, 2011.

  1. canuck

    canuck Closed Account

    February 1971

    I was 13, in Gr 7 and no doubt a right little bastard in the throes of puberty. I do recall that girls and music began to be much more interesting that year. Maggie May was released in 71. One of my first favourites.

    Metric conversion started in Canada in 71 and was phased in while I was in school.
     
  2. bofors

    bofors Senior Member

    I was in primary school and we had already converted to decimal

    regards

    Robert
     
  3. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    One of the perils of being a certain age is that one still automatically converts a price in the supermarket with the "old" pre-decimal coinage, so your 60p orange of today becomes 12 bob in the "old" money !

    Later in the same year we drove to Bellagio on Lake Como............. Sheer bliss !

    Oh to be young again ! -_-

    Ron, at 87
     

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  4. englandphil

    englandphil Very Senior Member

    Still filling Nappies at that time of my life Im afraid, a couple of weeks short of being 2
     
  5. geoff501

    geoff501 Achtung Feind hört mit

    I am one of the few in the US that, for the most part, support a change to metric. When others moan and groan about the concept, I ask "What is half of 15 ft, 7 3/8 inches? Invariabley, they say that the have no idea without pencil and paper. Then I ask what is half of 4.75 meters is. Most can get that in their heads

    But it makes you use your brain. I've lost count of the number of times I've cut a piece of timber, or other material, Exactly 100mm short. Doh!
     
  6. beeza

    beeza Senior Member

    Working in Alice Springs central Australia.

    David
     
  7. Jedburgh22

    Jedburgh22 Very Senior Member

    On an exercise in Cyprus I think - listened to some recent research on BBC about the Sterling 'Old' Money and the new yesterday on BBC R4 - they said that people were a lot better at mental arthimetic with £SD rather than decimal and for me it was always a joy to find the odd Victorian or Edwardian coin in the change. Money did seem to go further back then.
    2.5 Pence for a bar of chocolate £1 now
    9d fish and chips around £6 now
    2/- a pint (20p) now around £3.50

    Oh for a time machine
     
  8. KevinC

    KevinC Slightly wierd

    a few months away from turning double digits

    Speaking of decimal, when will the UK join the real world and get rid of feet, inches, pounds (not the currency) and the ridiculous stone. ;)
     
  9. Theobob

    Theobob Senior Member

    In 1971 i move up to secondary school,having spent the last six year trying really hard to figure out pounds shillings and pence,only to be told "forget all that we`ve now gone decimal.
    Been rubbish at maths ever since!!
    :confused:
    DOH!
     
  10. Vitesse

    Vitesse Senior Member

    2/- a pint (20p) now around £3.50

    Oh for a time machine
    Or a decimal currency conversion table?:D

    I thought 20p a pint looked expensive for 1971: I was only paying 10p in my local! That was for black & tan - mild was 9p a pint and bitter 11p!
     
  11. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER

    On the day you went, I would have still been thinking of my losses nearly five years to the day before 14/2/1966 when we went decimal.

    One the previous day 13/2/1966, for 6d, I received 48 aniseed balls. The next day 6d was only worth 5c, so I only received 40.

    My pocket money was worth 16.67% less. Bloody devastating!!:mad111:
     
  12. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Old Hickory Recon

    But it makes you use your brain. I've lost count of the number of times I've cut a piece of timber, or other material, Exactly 100mm short. Doh!

    10-15 years ago, our interstates were marked with mile and kilometer markers, which was a Federal gov't requirement. Problem was, the signs were looked the same, except for the small miles or km at the bottom. A lot of people would realize which was which as they whizzed by and their were a lot of episodes where emergency vehicles were sent to the wrong location because people thought they had read a mile marker, when it was a kilometer marker. The km markers were finally removed.
     
  13. Vitesse

    Vitesse Senior Member

    On the day you went, I would have still been thinking of my losses nearly five years to the day before 14/2/1966 when we went decimal.

    One the previous day 13/2/1966, for 6d, I received 48 aniseed balls. The next day 6d was only worth 5c, so I only received 40.

    My pocket money was worth 16.67% less. Bloody devastating!!:mad111:
    That's as maybe, but at least Australia and New Zealand had the sense to peg their dollars to ten shillings rather than a pound: not doing that was the cause of massive inflation on low-priced items here as the banks and most companies refused to deal in ½p coins.
     
  14. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER

    That's as maybe, but at least Australia and New Zealand had the sense to peg their dollars to ten shillings rather than a pound: not doing that was the cause of massive inflation on low-priced items here as the banks and most companies refused to deal in ½p coins.

    Not too much different here:

    We couldn't spend a halfpenny or a penny on or after 14/2/1966.

    If we had a combination of pennies and halfpennies, for 3d, we could exchange them for 2c of lollies. If we did that 4 times we would only get 8c. If we had a shilling's worth of copper in one go, we would get 10c.

    So we really copped it in the neck both ways as well!
     
  15. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    I was just waiting for my 20th birthday to come around in April and I would end my apprenticeship as an Aerospace Toolmaker, earning real money.
    The trouble was devalueation due to the decimalization:(

    Same happened here in Germany when the Euro came, grossly inflated prices overnight.

    Nothing changes.

    Regards
    Tom
     
  16. Paul Pariso

    Paul Pariso Very Senior Member

    If it was a week day I was probably in junior school playing in a sand pit or something equally as thrilling as I was only 5!! :lol:
     
  17. wtid45

    wtid45 Very Senior Member

    I was more than likely talking rubbish and spitting food, and dribbling a lot..........as I was just over 7 months old:lol:
     
  18. canuck

    canuck Closed Account

    I was more than likely talking rubbish and spitting food, and dribbling a lot..........as I was just over 7 months old:lol:

    Age is no excuse for bad manners!:lol:
     
  19. wtid45

    wtid45 Very Senior Member

    Age is no excuse for bad manners!:lol:
    You have just confirmed the impression Randy, gave me you Mounties, have a spot on sense of humour :lol:
     
  20. geoff501

    geoff501 Achtung Feind hört mit

    I thought 20p a pint looked expensive for 1971: I was only paying 10p in my local! That was for black & tan - mild was 9p a pint and bitter 11p!
    It bloody well was! those were night club prices. Previously you could get mild at 1/11d a pint (around 9p) in the back room of the Queens head (think it was called, now closed) they would always serve you, closest pub to the cop shop too.
     

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