What If?

Discussion in 'General' started by Dac, Jul 21, 2005.

  1. Kiwiwriter

    Kiwiwriter Very Senior Member

    Originally posted by Dac@Aug 4 2005, 02:51 AM
    The reason I started this topic is I read in Bodyguard of Lies, the crucial importance Allied high command(Churchill, Brook, Eisenhower et. al.) put in decieving Hitler about Allied intentions even a month after the Normandy landings. They feared that the introduction of strong German forces such as the Divisions defending the Pas de Calais would allow the Germans to overwhelm the Allied right flank. I was wondering if these fears were truly reflected on the battlefield.
    [post=37244]Quoted post[/post]

    Good question. I don't know if the fear extended down to army and corps planning. Once you get below that level, you're more concerned with what's directly in front of you. Sorry, not the best answer.
     
  2. Gerard

    Gerard Seelow/Prora

    I know that Carlo D'Este states in the Book "Decision in Normandy" that Montgomery was preoccupied with the Right Flank as opposed to the British side in the run up to the Landings but I dont know if thats an answer to your question either.
     
  3. Dac

    Dac Senior Member

    Originally posted by Kiwiwriter+Aug 5 2005, 05:54 AM-->(Kiwiwriter @ Aug 5 2005, 05:54 AM)</div><div class='quotemain'><!--QuoteBegin-Dac@Aug 4 2005, 02:51 AM
    The reason I started this topic is I read in Bodyguard of Lies, the crucial importance Allied high command(Churchill, Brook, Eisenhower et. al.) put in decieving Hitler about Allied intentions even a month after the Normandy landings. They feared that the introduction of strong German forces such as the Divisions defending the Pas de Calais would allow the Germans to overwhelm the Allied right flank. I was wondering if these fears were truly reflected on the battlefield.
    [post=37244]Quoted post[/post]

    Good question. I don't know if the fear extended down to army and corps planning. Once you get below that level, you're more concerned with what's directly in front of you. Sorry, not the best answer.
    [post=37282]Quoted post[/post]
    [/b]
    It helps me understand what must have been a very chaotic situation. Thanks.
     
  4. Dpalme01

    Dpalme01 Member

    Originally posted by Gnomey@Jul 21 2005, 11:16 PM
    If 15th army had been on the beaches, surely the allies system of intelligence would have picked up the move beforehand and reconsidered the landing site although the did miss the paratroop division that defended Omaha beach on D-day.

    If 15th army was there, the allies didn't know about it and the Panzers had freedom of movement, there would have been almost no chance of the invasion succeeded, none at all.
    [post=36716]Quoted post[/post]


    Yes, ut I think that the Germans would have had enough sence to just scatter the around the area ready to move in when ever the allies landed. The Germans did not know when the invasion was goin to be so they could not have made such extensive preparations. So I think that the Panzers with some planning could have gon undetected and un suspected, and could have pounded the allied soldiers just behind the beaches, Not on the beaches, so they would be ble to avoid being hit by Navel Bombardment
     

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