What got you interested?

Discussion in 'Historiography' started by Gage, Mar 4, 2006.

  1. calamazoo

    calamazoo Junior Member

    My interest spawned from stories my brother in law told me. His parents were Dutch and they lived walking distance from Germany in south Holland. Also as a student in school in Canada it really P*ssed me off big time that never a word of the two great wars was taught. They were far too obsessed with teaching us old English history.
     
  2. Kitty

    Kitty Very Senior Member

    Hey calamazoo, at least you got taught English history, i got American!
    Anyway, my interest was first sparked by a dutch veteran of the Princes Irene brigade who lived across the road from us. I could't understand why he was in Cheshire and not Holland. And then the BoB flight stormed over my house when i was eight or nine. Oh for the rattling windows again.
    Then it was reignited about five or six yea sago by a formation of Spits flying down our valley, just above the trees. Then family history kicked in ,and the first book i bought was The Men Who Breached The Dams. Very funny in places.
    :D
     
  3. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Probably 'Warlord' or 'Victor' (book for boys!!), maybe even a 'Battle action picture weekly' ("Trapped on the wire by his B****cks" The true story of ww2!! etc.etc.) could then look things up in the old mans books.
     
  4. Sepiraph

    Sepiraph Junior Member

    I thought Mangele was an interesting man, with interesting experiments

    Interesting experiments? What about the innocent lives that he took and the untold cruelty in the satanic deeds that he did? Mangele is no more 'interesting' than your average psychopathic killer. He didn't even have the guts to take his own life after the war, and instead just hid himself like a rat.
     
  5. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    Searched for over 40 mins to see if a thread like this existed. Nearly started a new one.

    Anyway, I was always interested in hearing about the battles of WW1 & 2 from my history teacher although the political ramblings from him made it seem such a boring topic I never really wanted to read up on it.

    I remember a history exam question, "What was the name given to Hitlers elite army?"

    I answered the AA. :lol:

    The TV series years ago , The machine gunners was quite interesting and gave me a wee insight to what wartime Britain was like.

    Images of the Holocaust always intrigued too me as to how and why they were treated like that.

    All these little snippets of war gradually built up but it wasn't until I'd seen Saving Private Ryan and Band of Brothers that the whole WW2 thing exploded on me and now I'm completely and utterly hooked on it.
     
  6. James S

    James S Very Senior Member

    Difficult to say for me it was an issue of The Second World War published by the IWM and Prunnells "Raider at Large" -about the Graf Spee - I was 8 at the time. (1967).
     
  7. militarycross

    militarycross Very Senior Member

    Dad gave me a cigar box full of his badges and medals and things when I was in cadets. It has been a lifelong study and collecting habit he created that day.
     

    Attached Files:

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  8. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    Blimey mate, that's some collection you've got going there.
     
  9. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    What got me interested ?

    A buff envelope, headed OHMS, dated September 1942 and containing an invitation to present myself to a Primary Training Unit in Bury St.Edmunds, Hertfordshire on the 1st October 1942.

    I have maintained my interest ever since

    Ron
     
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  10. urqh

    urqh Senior Member

    Grandad, uncles, dad, and growing up with that generation still living it.
     
  11. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    I had a similar envelope as Ron's inviting me to attend the Gibralter Barracks at Bury St Edmonds also - two months later at aged 18 ! What really got me very interested though was Roy Farran's book -" Winged Dagger " of his time in the SAS
     
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  12. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    I suppose it was when I was a young boy, my fathers friend gave him an advanced copy of the 'Cruel sea' and I was given it to read after my father had finished with it.

    After that it was regular trips to the Harris Library at Preston where I borrowed books on all the three services.

    Most of my reading is historical and not a lot of fiction.

    However I do enjoy reading a book that interweaves fact with fiction and remains credible to the reader.

    Regards
    Tom

    Regards
    Tom
     
  13. militarycross

    militarycross Very Senior Member

    Blimey mate, that's some collection you've got going there.

    You don't know the half of it! That cigar box of stuff went wild fire!:exactly:
     
  14. At Home Dad (Returning)

    At Home Dad (Returning) Well-Known Member

    Hallo all

    I guess I got interested because I grew up in 'good years' to grow up in - the late '60s to mid 70s!

    It must be admitted, Action Man played a Major Role, as did 1/32nd scale meltable soldiers, war movies on the tv during school holidays and a feeling that you really were surrounded by Veterans. If I took more notice at the time I could tell you more about them all. But, back then, my time was taken up playing the game every boy loved: War.

    I wonder how those Veterans must have shaken their heads, or chuckled in their beer to themselves, "if only those boys knew"...

    But there we were, running over the rubble of 'bomb sites', a massive mob of average age ten year olds in monkey boots, wearing every assortment of beret's and sidecaps (baseball caps were nowhere!) you could imagine!

    Making the universal 'brrrrrrrrrrrrrr' noise of a German machine gun and lobbing invisible hand grenades from foxholes only a few yards away from each other. Where I grew up, there were still piles of rubble which were once houses and empty burnt out warehouses, believe it or not! Quite a few pillboxes to duck and dive around (although you'd never go there after dusk), making grenade attacks into block houses (this time with bricks) and storming the pillboxes with Sten's made of the correct shaped twigs. That twig may have been found hours ago, but knowing you'd most likely being playing 'war' later, you've kept it all day long, safe and secure! Or, joy of joys, you might find some old pipe of the correct scale and length, the perfect bazooka!

    "DurDurDurDurDurDurDur!" That's the sound of a twigSten. Of course, we learnt all this from the pages of Battle and Commando and War Picture etc,
    who made clear the differences between the sounds of weapons. Regularly swopped, the comic supply never ended and you leant your combat moves from the cover art!

    Can you imagine the fun of attacking your own real Docks Area, when you've just watched "The Gift Horse" on tv? Rummaging through the detritus of flattened warehouses before making your way down to the River to rummage on the shore, eyes keenly looking for shrapnel but not really knowing what shrapnel looked like.

    The docks were virtually empty back then, just unused, just sitting there to be a playground for kids playing War in their grandad's hat, throwing invisible grenades the way he showed you with an apple or orange when he got a bit jokey.

    The kind of stuff you wouldn't let your own kids do, the type of stuff kids aren't even encouraged to do. Play 'out', run around, be active, be fit, be free, be free to imagine, be free to nearly but not quite break your arm falling down a hole. And do it supervised only by your peers.

    Or else, we'd play out with our dolls, yes, little boys with dolls (who could imagine it these days!), using our imagination to recreate battlefields and there was always the one kid who seemed to get the best kit and vehicles before anyone else while you eagerly await the latest delivery at your own particular favourite toyshop. Using matches to burn small holes in the Afrika Korps jacket and always being disappointed with the plastic Afrika Korps feldmutze... The revolution of grippable hands and then, crikey, movable eyes (which never really made sense)

    Then sitting down after dinner (eaten at the table, with the family) you'd stick together plastic kits (or if you were really good, you'd paint them first), and know intimate aspects of most aircraft or tank from the period. You would be the general manager of a production line, waiting to face battle against 1/72nd scale commando's with oars in kayaks (which also floated in the bath). Laying out the newspaper, getting glue on your thumb that you could later peel off and study your fingerprints...


    Kids these days dont know what they're missing!

    Or maybe I'm getting old!

    Anyway, they can do it all on a portable hand held screen these days and their friends are people they've never met, living on the other side of the world.
     
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  15. cash_13

    cash_13 Senior Member

    At home dad.

    That was a well written and thought provoking piece that had me reminiscing of my own youth in the early seventies and yes it all got the Grey matter whirling especially the Twig sten guns......D-Day Dawson always had a sten and it was the gun to have....

    Thanks for that its made my day as you have brought back a lot of happy memories

    Regards Lee F
     
  16. Paul Reed

    Paul Reed Ubique MOD

    Hallo all

    I guess I got interested because I grew up in 'good years' to grow up in - the late '60s to mid 70s!

    It must be admitted, Action Man played a Major Role, as did 1/32nd scale meltable soldiers, war movies on the tv during school holidays and a feeling that you really were surrounded by Veterans. If I took more notice at the time I could tell you more about them all. But, back then, my time was taken up playing the game every boy loved: War.

    I wonder how those Veterans must have shaken their heads, or chuckled in their beer to themselves, "if only those boys knew"...

    But there we were, running over the rubble of 'bomb sites', a massive mob of average age ten year olds in monkey boots, wearing every assortment of beret's and sidecaps (baseball caps were nowhere!) you could imagine!

    Making the universal 'brrrrrrrrrrrrrr' noise of a German machine gun and lobbing invisible hand grenades from foxholes only a few yards away from each other. Where I grew up, there were still piles of rubble which were once houses and empty burnt out warehouses, believe it or not! Quite a few pillboxes to duck and dive around (although you'd never go there after dusk), making grenade attacks into block houses (this time with bricks) and storming the pillboxes with Sten's made of the correct shaped twigs. That twig may have been found hours ago, but knowing you'd most likely being playing 'war' later, you've kept it all day long, safe and secure! Or, joy of joys, you might find some old pipe of the correct scale and length, the perfect bazooka!

    "DurDurDurDurDurDurDur!" That's the sound of a twigSten. Of course, we learnt all this from the pages of Battle and Commando and War Picture etc,
    who made clear the differences between the sounds of weapons. Regularly swopped, the comic supply never ended and you leant your combat moves from the cover art!

    Can you imagine the fun of attacking your own real Docks Area, when you've just watched "The Gift Horse" on tv? Rummaging through the detritus of flattened warehouses before making your way down to the River to rummage on the shore, eyes keenly looking for shrapnel but not really knowing what shrapnel looked like.

    The docks were virtually empty back then, just unused, just sitting there to be a playground for kids playing War in their grandad's hat, throwing invisible grenades the way he showed you with an apple or orange when he got a bit jokey.

    The kind of stuff you wouldn't let your own kids do, the type of stuff kids aren't even encouraged to do. Play 'out', run around, be active, be fit, be free, be free to imagine, be free to nearly but not quite break your arm falling down a hole. And do it supervised only by your peers.

    Or else, we'd play out with our dolls, yes, little boys with dolls (who could imagine it these days!), using our imagination to recreate battlefields and there was always the one kid who seemed to get the best kit and vehicles before anyone else while you eagerly await the latest delivery at your own particular favourite toyshop. Using matches to burn small holes in the Afrika Korps jacket and always being disappointed with the plastic Afrika Korps feldmutze... The revolution of grippable hands and then, crikey, movable eyes (which never really made sense)

    Then sitting down after dinner (eaten at the table, with the family) you'd stick together plastic kits (or if you were really good, you'd paint them first), and know intimate aspects of most aircraft or tank from the period. You would be the general manager of a production line, waiting to face battle against 1/72nd scale commando's with oars in kayaks (which also floated in the bath). Laying out the newspaper, getting glue on your thumb that you could later peel off and study your fingerprints...


    Kids these days dont know what they're missing!

    Or maybe I'm getting old!

    Anyway, they can do it all on a portable hand held screen these days and their friends are people they've never met, living on the other side of the world.

    If I could award a prize, that is one of the best things I've read on here for a while. Thanks for taking me back to those times.
     
  17. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    At Home Dad
    Or maybe I'm getting old!

    Aren't we all!
    That was great to read AHD.
    Those were the days weren't they?
    I've tried to get my kids out to play, it just doesn't happen, that culture isn't there anymore.
     
  18. Gage

    Gage The Battle of Barking Creek MOD

    Aren't we all!
    That was great to read AHD.
    Those were the days weren't they?
    I've tried to get my kids out to play, it just doesn't happen, that culture isn't there anymore.

    I was never in. Fantastic days. A great way to use your imagination.

    What a fantastic read.
    Action man was great, wasn't it? I always had an MP40 rather than a Sten thou. :)
     
  19. Gerard

    Gerard Seelow/Prora

    I was never in. Fantastic days. A great way to use your imagination.

    What a fantastic read.
    Action man was great, wasn't it? I always had an MP40 rather than a Sten thou. :)
    Gotta admit that always used a Schmeisser as well!! That was truly a great post AHD. Fantastic and very thought provoking. And if you try and tell the kids of today they wouldnt believe ya!
     
  20. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    At home dad, I've got to agree with Paul. That is definately one of the best written posts I've read on here for a long time. You should be a writer or something. The way you describe your youth was fascinating.

    You can have a rep for that one. ;)
     

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