What does this badge make you think of? ( Non-Nazi Swastika usage).

Discussion in 'General' started by Owen, May 25, 2006.

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  1. Jedburgh22

    Jedburgh22 Very Senior Member

    I can recall having books by Rudyard Kipling published pre WW1 with Swastika's embossed on the cover and spine. As Nicola says the swastika was hijacked and a lot of people see it simply as a Nazi emblem.
     
  2. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Aye chaps,
    Moved these two posts (from here) to an already existing thread that's more focused on the subject of the Swastika's other meanings.
    Hope that's OK.

    I'm sure there was a more substantial thread on it somewhere??

    ~A

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Capt Bill

    Capt Bill wanderin off at a tangent

    it is unfortunate that any 'broken cross' symbolism is in this modern age associated with fasism

    this is the flag of the white supremacist movement in South Africa
    [​IMG]

    look familiar ?
     
  4. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    This made me smile:

    The Swastika
    From Baden-Powell, What Scouts Can Do: More Yarns, 1921
    [​IMG]
    The Thanks Badge.

    "I want specially to remind Scouts to keep their eyes open and never fail to spot anyone wearing this badge. It is their duty then to go up to such person, make the Scout sign, and ask if they can be of any service to the wearer."
    Baden-Powell: "What Scouts Can Do--More Yarns"
     
  5. Jedburgh22

    Jedburgh22 Very Senior Member

    There was great sympathy for the NAZIs in South Africa and SW Africa among the German population and many of the Boers, Robbie Leibrandt a South African boxer was smuggled into SA by the Abwehr and led the authorities a lively dance, and was also credited for signalling troopship movements from Durban towards Suez which led to some severe losses. The reasons for the German sympathy go back to the British use of concentration camps during the Boer War as well as German movies like Oom Paul about Paul Kruger the Boer leader. This sympathy was eveident even in the 1980s with soem extreme Boers displaying swastika flags at home

    The link below expands on this somewhat
    http://www.witness.co.za/index.php?showcontent&global[_id]=18150
     
  6. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Merged in another thread relating to that swastika coin.
    Posts #26-39
     
  7. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    6th Indian Cavalry Brigade used withe swastika on the green square as it sign during the ww1.
     

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  8. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    For whatever reason, I abhor any symbol that reminds me of the Third Reich.

    As simple as that.

    Ron
     
  9. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    Rightly so. The nazis appropriated and defiled what was a benefical symbol in an irreversible way.

    More post-nazi trash here.
     
  10. Vladd

    Vladd Member

    I must admit the the badge posted by the op made me think of the flag of the South African group AWB formed in 1973 by Eugène Terre'Blanche, who remained the leader until he was murdered by two of his black farm workers over a wage dispute. The AWB flag is composed of three black sevens (forming a triskelion) in a white circle upon a red background. According to AWB, the sevens, 'the number of JAHWEH', 'stand to oppose the number 666, the number of the anti-Christ'. Red is considered to represent Jesus' blood, while black stands for bravery and courage. The inner white circle symbolizes the "eternal struggle", or according to other sources "eternal life". To me it looks like a cheap Nazis knock off.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Jagdflieger

    Jagdflieger Junior Member

  12. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Getting side-tracked while looking at Finnish usage, this intrigued me:
    The sign was used in the nineteenth and twentieth century cartography to indicate electric power plants.
    Symbols.com - Symbol 15:1
    Anybody ever seen it on an old map? Couldn't find a web example.

    Couple more from the US:
    [​IMG]

    And one early attempt in vain to hang onto it:
    [​IMG]

    Now how long before Photobucket kills these pictures from my account... :rolleyes:
     
  13. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

  14. Otto

    Otto GröFaZ Admin

    5 years on and this thread keeps popping up, very interesting topic. Strong work for Von Poop to continually merge new threads into this one.

    I re-read the first page of this thread. That ManWoman character was a bit in the news in Canada when I was a kid. He founded an organization called "the Friends of the Swastika" which despite the ominous title, was an organization dedicated to reclaiming the symbol's positive aspect. He apparently (evidently?) has hundreds of swastikas tattooed all over his body, claiming that he gains a positive power from the symbol, new age indeed. At least his mantra is one I can get behind: "To Hell With Hitler." I guess he's still at it too: more info here:
    ManWoman - Warrior of Sacred Imagination | Celebrate the Holiness You Are

    Incidentally, the very first post in this thread immediately reminded me of those vinyl record adapters. I guess I've spent my fair share of time in front of turntable jockeys.
     

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  15. Auditman

    Auditman Senior Member

    I was discussing this thread with a colleague and he, being a bit of a transport buff, remembered something about Upminster Bridge Tube station on the London Underground District Line.

    The station was opened in 1934 (Wikipedia) and I quote "The floor is tiled with a reverse swastika pattern, a popular decorative design at the time the station was constructed". My colleague also sweems to recall that these were painted over during WW2

    JIm
     
  16. Jaeger

    Jaeger Senior Member

    The symbol, no matter what it may have meant in the past, will forever more be the symbol of the third reich. A symbol of the holocaust, a symbol of opression. Basically a symbol of evil.

    In Norse mythology, Freya the godess of fertility, love and beauty is often depicted riding in her cart pulled by cats. The wheels if the cart is fashioned by swastikas (a symbol of fertility in this case)

    One of the the really bad bits about the nazis in Norway is that they corrupted our history. Anyone interested in our history of the Viking era goes to great length to explain that they are not nazis.

    I'm with Ron on this matter.
     
  17. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

  18. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    The symbol, no matter what it may have meant in the past, will forever more be the symbol of the third reich. A symbol of the holocaust, a symbol of oppression. Basically a symbol of evil.

    In Norse mythology, Freya the godess of fertility, love and beauty is often depicted riding in her cart pulled by cats. The wheels if the cart is fashioned by swastikas (a symbol of fertility in this case)

    One of the the really bad bits about the nazis in Norway is that they corrupted our history. Anyone interested in our history of the Viking era goes to great length to explain that they are not nazis.

    I'm with Ron on this matter.


    Jarger,

    I agree with you on the Swastika now only being associated with the Nazi regime.

    A great pity, as it has been around so long before being adopted by the NSDAP.

    No matter what symbol was adopted, it would only have ended in the same stigmatisation.

    Regards
    Tom
     
  19. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Polish 22nd Mountain Infantry Insignia:
    [​IMG]

    1st Motorized Artillery Regiment
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/23/1._Pułk_Artylerii_Motorowej_%281st_Motorized_Artillery_Regiment%29.jpg

    State Air Defense League:
    [​IMG]

    'Herb Boreyko' (?? - not entirely sure what this one is)
    [​IMG]

    Spotted the first in Blandford's Army Badge book - then found more on this Polish wiki page:
    Swastyka – Wikipedia, wolna encyklopedia
    Google Translate
    Dodgy Translation:
    Sign of the swastika was known among the Slavs , the Polish lands - was also called Swarg [1] .
    In the period of the Republic of the swastika symbol is also the coat of arms could be seen noble Boreyko . In its ancient role of the talisman has survived the Podhale , where he is called "cross the unexpected 'name was proposed by prof. Antoniewicz (in the 20s of last century), in various shapes wheezing or painted on the ceiling beams and other nooks and crannies, had - as a symbol of the Sun - frighten the "bad" that they would like to nest at home. You can see, among others in the shelter Murowaniec Gasienicowa the barrier stairwell .
    In the interwar period, the swastika symbol appeared in the Polish Army as part of the emblem worn on the collar of his uniform for artillerymen 21 and 22 Mountain Infantry Division and regimental badges: 1 , 2 , 3, 4 , 5 and 6, and the Regiment of Riflemen Infantry Regiment 4 . Dark blue swastika was the background badge instructor and Air Defense League-proof . This mark was also a symbol which was founded in 1822 IGNIS Publishing Society ( Lat. fire.)
    Especially liked the swastika symbol Mieczyslaw Karlowicz , composer and mountaineer , author of numerous pioneering come and go Tatra . It signed with their marks on the mountain trails, visiting cards and letters to friends. When in 1909, was killed in an avalanche in Little Koscielec , friends put in place of his death boulder with a commemorative inscription and the sign of the swastika. Similarly, a sign that he used to Valery Elias-Radzikowski - Boreyko, placing a swastika in your signature.
     
  20. Jakob Kjaersgaard

    Jakob Kjaersgaard Senior Member

    The attached picture is of the entrance of the Carlsberg brewery in Copenhagen.

    The founder of the brewery Carl Jacobsen chose the swastika symbol in 1881 because he believed it was a symbol og good luck and which has been used in many different cultures around the world. It's said that Carl discovered the symbol on a trip to Greece where he saw it carved into some ruins.
    Before the nazis came along, the swastika was even used on the Carlsberg label.
     

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