War Diary: 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, Jan - Oct 1945

Discussion in 'The Brigade of Guards' started by dbf, May 30, 2015.

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    Snow fell during the last days of December and the countryside had been snowbound ever since, making training difficult and many of the smaller roads impassible.
    Company and Company/Squadron training has been carried out in the vicinity and on the ranges at BOURG LEOPOLD where Companies have been able to have Field Firing Exercises.

    1 January 1945
    -

    2 January
    The Regimental Band arrived to stay with the Battalion till the 10th.
    Its engagements cover the whole DIVISION, but several dates have been arranged for the Battalion.

    3 January
    -

    4 January
    The COLDSTREAM Officers of the GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION dined together in the Chateau D’OPHEYLISSEM.
    93 Officers were present and the Regimental Band was in attendance.

    5 January
    -

    6 January
    -

    7 January
    -

    8 January
    -

    9 January
    Battalion Signal Exercise to test the Battalion Wireless Communications from Battalion H.Q. down to Companies.

    10 January
    -

    11 January
    -

    12 January
    Battalion H.Q. complete and Company Carriers with 19 Sets took part.

    13 January
    -

    14 January
    -

    15 - 16 January
    Combined T.E.W.T. for Officers with the 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS.
    The subject of the T.E.W.T. was Infantry and Armoured Co-operation.

    17 January
    The Commanding Officer gave a Lecture to Officers on ‘Issuing Orders’.

    18 January
    -

    19 January
    -

    20 January
    -

    21 January
    The Commanding Officer gave a Lecture to all Officers on ‘The History of the Regiment’ up to 1815.

    22 January
    -

    23 January
    -

    24 January
    -

    25 January
    The ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS Officer attached to the Battalion gave a Lecture on R.A.S.C. organisation and working as it affects this DIVISION.

    26 January
    During the night the temperature fell to -4 degrees Fahrenheit.
    Courses for Sergeants, Corporals and Section Leaders have been run by the Second-in-Command, and all Companies have had two Drill Parades per week and a Route March.

    27 January
    The temperature rose slightly but it remained exceedingly cold.

    28 January
    The Commanding Officer gave a second Lecture to all Officers on ‘The History of the Regiment’ from 1815 - 1939.
    It was attended by several Officers from the 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS.
    The Brigadier came to dinner.

    29 January
    -

    30 January
    The Divisional Commander visited the Battalion during the morning
    The Commanding Officer arranged with 635 Field Squadron ROYAL ENGINEERS for Instruction to be given to the Battalion in blasting weapon pits in frozen ground.
    A thaw set in about 1930 hours.

    31 January
    The Corps Commander visited the Battalion during the morning and saw all Officers down to and including Company Commanders.
     
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    APPENDIX
    NOMINAL ROLL OF OFFICERS AND WARRANT OFFICERS BY COMPANIES
    5TH BATTALION COLDSTREAM GUARDS
    1ST JANUARY 1945

    BATTALION H.Q.
    Lieutenant-Colonel E.R. HILL DSO - Commanding Officer
    Major M.E. ADEANE - Second-in-Command
    Captain J.N. AGNEW - Adjutant
    Captain J. PEREIRA - Intelligence Officer
    Captain & Quartermaster S.B.R. COOPER - Quartermaster
    Captain J.B. INGRAM, ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS - Medical Officer
    Captain Reverend R.H. TOMLINSON, ROYAL ARMY CHAPLAINS DEPARTMENT - Padre
    R.S.M. R.W. SMITH DCM - Regimental Sergeant Major
    R.Q.M.S. E. LOVEJOY - Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant
    Drill Sergeant R. SKELLS
    Drill Sergeant J. COWLEY DCM

    NO. 1 COMPANY
    Major D.A. KENNARD MC - Company Commander, 1 Company
    Captain A.B. PEMBERTON - Second-in-Command, 1 Company
    Lieutenant E.R. FIFOOT - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    Lieutenant J.G.E. CHESTER - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    Lieutenant M. BONSEY - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    C.S.M. F FARNHILL DCM - Company Sergeant Major, 1 Company
    C.Q.M.S. R. PATERSON - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 1 Company

    NO. 2 COMPANY
    Major The Honourable D.M.G.J. WILLOUGHBY - Company Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant C.M. MANDER - Second-in-Command, 2 Company
    Lieutenant D.E. PLATER - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant T.R. SYMONS - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant The Honourable P.A. STRUTT - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    C.S.M. G. WHYTE - Company Sergeant Major, 2 Company
    C.Q.M.S. B. AYRDS - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 2 Company

    NO. 3 COMPNAY
    Captain D.I.T. EASTMAN MC - Company Commander, 3 Company
    Captain W.J. STRAKER SMITH - Second-in-Command, 3 Company
    Lieutenant A.K. FEILING - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    Lieutenant R.F. MONTAGUE - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    C.S.M. S. BERRY - Company Sergeant Major, 3 Company
    C.Q.M.S. A. TOWNSEND - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 3 Company

    NO. 4 COMPANY
    Major J.d’H. HAMILTON - Company Commander, 4 Company
    Captain I.O. LIDDELL - Second-in-Command, 4 Company
    Lieutenant C.N. ACHESON GRAY - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    Lieutenant M.W. WALL - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    Lieutenant G.D. WAUHOPE - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    C.S.M. N. REID - Company Sergeant Major, 4 Company
    C.Q.M.S. F. MARSDEN - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 4 Company

    H.Q. COMPANY
    Captain A. GIBBS - Company Commander, H.Q. Company
    Captain R. THOMPSON - M.T.O.
    Lieutenant The Earl of PLYMOUTH - Signal Officer
    Lieutenant P.R. SPURGIN - Pioneer Officer
    C.S.M. A SEATHERTON - Company Sergeant Major, H.Q. Company
    C.Q.M.S. T. CONNELLY - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, H.Q. Company

    SUPORT COMPANY
    Major G.B. MACKEAN - Company Commander, Support Company
    Captain B. BLOWER - Carrier Platoon Commander
    Lieutenant M. BENDIX - Anti-Tank Platoon Commander
    Lieutenant T.A. MATHESON - Anti-Tank Platoon Second-in-Command
    Captain J.T. PAGET - Mortar Platoon Commander
    Lieutenant The Honourable J.J. ORMSBY-GORE - Mortar Platoon Second-in-Command
    C.S.M. G. TILLING - Company Sergeant Major, Support Company
    C.Q.M.S. T. THORNTON - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, Support Company

    Lieutenant E. STRAGHAN - Attached H.Q. GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION


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    FIELD RETURNS


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    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    Tuesday, 2nd January 1945
    No. 6

    BIG WESTERN FRONT AIR BATTLES
    In air battles over the Western Front yesterday the Germans lost at least 193 planes. Allied losses were 25 Aircraft.
    The Germans lost 125 of the 250 fighters they sent against British airfields and ground targets in the LOW COUNTRIES. Four British pilots were lost.
    British Tactical aircraft again hammered enemy supply lines inside GERMANY.
    Mosquitoes with 4000lb bombs attacked railway tunnels and British heavies again bombed the DORTMUND - EMS Canal. American bombers attacked supply lines near HANOVER.
    Last night R.A.F. bombers were again over GERMANY.

    THE LAND FIGHTING
    American 3rd ARMY troops are within two miles of ST HUBERT. On their right flank a German counter attack has gained ground. Mid way between ST HUBERT and BASTOGNE American tanks have driven six miles into the Salient.
    German attempts to cut the American wedge beyond BASTOGNE cost them 67 tanks on Saturday.
    American 7th ARMY troops have been meeting strong German counter offensives and have had to give ground between BTICHE and the RHINE.

    MORE PROGESS IN BUDAPEST
    Russian troops in BUDAPEST have made further progress and have almost won the battle for the western part of the City. The Germans have set fire to much of BUDAPEST.
    A delegation from the provisional Government in liberated HUNGARY is negotiating an armistice in MOSCOW.
    In CZECHOSLOVAKIA Russian troops are only two miles from LUCENEC.

    GENERAL SBOIE RECEIVES DELEGATION
    In ATHENS General Scobie yesterday received an EAM delegation but no agreement was reached. He has again appealed for acceptance of his truce terms.
    The Regent has stated that a now Government is soon being formed.

    5TH RETAKE MORE GROUND
    In ITALY 5th ARMY troops have regained nearly all the ground they lost in the SERCHIO VALLEY last week.
    8th ARMY men have made more gains north of FAENZA.
     
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    1 February 1945
    Second-in-Command (acting Intelligence Officer) attended Intelligence Conference at H.Q. GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION on Operation VERITABLE.

    2 February
    -

    3 February
    Brigadier 32 GUARDS BRIGADE held a Conference at H.Q. GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION at which he briefed all Officers down to Company Commanders on forthcoming Operation VERITABLE.
    The Commanding Officer, Second-in-Command, Adjutant and Quartermaster dined with the 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS at NEERHEYLISSEM.

    4 February
    Recce Party under Second-in-Command went to HAAREN (near TILBURG) to inspect new area at present occupied by 5th Battalion BLACK WATCH.

    5 February
    Commanding Officer briefed all Officers on Operation VERITABLE.
    Maps and air photographs were issued.

    6 February
    Battalion Advance Party under Captain B. BLOWER left for HAAREN.

    7 February
    Battalion moved to HAAREN.
    14 hours were spent on the road due to diversions, collapse of roads in places and floods.
    One T.C.L. had an accident and the driver was killed.

    Possibly:-
    http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2766262/
    GANNON, JOHN
    Rank: Driver
    Service No: T/14527676
    Date of Death: 07/02/1945
    Age: 20
    Regiment/Service: Royal Army Service Corps
    Grave Reference: Row 3. Grave 1.
    Cemetery: GOIRLE ROMAN CATHOLIC CEMETERY
    Additional Information: Son of Martin and Emily Gannon, of Cheapside, Birmingham.

    8 February
    Commanding Officer attended an ‘O’ Group at H.Q. 32 GUARDS BRIGADE at OLISTERWIJK.

    9 February
    Issue of defence overprints for VERITABLE.
    1100 Hours Battalion ‘O’ Group; the Commanding Officer gave out preliminary orders for Operation VERITABLE:-
    INFORMATION
    Enemy: 84 Infantry Division who hold the front from the River WAAL across to the MAAS had heavy casualties as a result of the opening of the offensive yesterday and have up to date been pushed back to the line MATERBON 8853; 8450; HASSUM 8543. They were definitely holding their original line in strength and it was not a false front.
    Tac R reports movement Northwards towards XANTEN 1141 which may be 15 P.G Division, and movement Northwards towards KEVELAER which may be 7 Para Division. These two Divisions are the most probable reinforcements for this sector and at what point they are used will have considerable bearing on the Division plan. They may be used to hold the HOCHWALD layback line which runs North and South in front of the HOCHWALD FOREST 0343. Enemy opposition so far has been patchy but a large number of mines have been encountered.
    Own Troops: 30 CORPS is attacking with 5 Divisions up, from right to left, 52 (H) DIVISION, 53(W) DIVISION, 15 (S) DIVISION, 2 CDN. DIVISION, 3 CDN. DIVISION. Follow up and reserve GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION and 43 DIVISION.
    The Corps plan is to destroy the enemy and break through in a Southerly direction between the two rivers. The Division tasks are to:-
    (1 ) Advance on the axis UDEM - SONSBECK 0635 - WESEL.
    (2 ) Capture and hold the high ground N.E. of SONSBECK 0635.
    (3 ) Push forward a strong mobile column to capture the bridge at WESEL if still intact.
    (4 ) Capture XANTEN 1141. 32 BRIGADE will capture SONSBEEK and the high ground to the N.E.
    Intention: COLDSTREAM Group will capture and hold the high ground N.E. of SONSBEEK.
    Method: 1. The Approach March. COLDSTREAM Group will lead 32 BRIGADE. 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS will marry up with 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS on the main road at 270398 and then advance via HERTOGENBOSCH, HEESCH, GRAVE, NIJMEGEN to GROESBEEK 7555. Here there will be a halt while the tanks top up. 32 BRIGADE centre lines then runs through MATERBON 8853, CROSSROADS 9646, UDEM 9842, KERVENHEIM 9938, SONSBEEK 0535, high ground 0737. The left hand Brigade of 43 DIVISION will be ahead of us as far as UDEM. 5 BRIGAE will be on our left and are making for the high ground South of HOCHWALD at 0340.
    We will probably spend tomorrow night near CLEVE, when the final plan will be made.
    2. The Operation. This is liable to be altered. With 5 BRIGADE up on the high ground 0340, the COLDSTREAM Group will pass through SONSBEEK (or by pas it if held) and occupy the high ground either side of the main road 0737. The WELSH Group will capture SONSBECK and occupy it. They will then be relieved by the SCOTS Group and send out columns to BONINGHART 1231, ALPEN 1531 and VEEN 1135. Next 5 BRIGADE will move to the high ground above XANTEN. Finally the COLDSTREAM Group will occupy the CROSSROADS in 1633 and the WELSH Group move up to the WESEL Bridge.
    3 Grouping: COLDSTREAM Group (Commanded Lieutenant-Colonel E.R. HILL)
    Under Command:- 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, one Platoon M.M.G., two Sections 128 Field Ambulance.
    In Support:- 86 Field Regiment, 64 Medium Rep.
    There will be an Air Contact Officer with the Group with a call on four TYPHOONS.
    Admin: Particular attention will be paid to sandbagging of vehicles against mines, and the use of fluorescent panels issued for own aircraft to identify us by.
    The Battalion is carrying five days rations and Companies will have with them an issue of tinned soup, tea, etc for use if there is difficulty in getting the cooker trucks up to them in the battle.
    Intercommunications: A special Order of March has been issued for the joint H.Q.
    Time: Reveille tomorrow will be at 0430 hours and from 0600 hours onwards the Battalion is at one hours notice to move.
    1800 Hours Order received postponing time of move to one hours notice from 1200 hours 10th February.

    10 February
    0800 Hours Order received ‘No move till 1800 hours and from then at 1 hours notice’
    1400 Hours Order received 'No move till 2400 hours and from then at 1 hours notice.’
    1600 Hours Sitrep (as at 0100). Mud and bad condition of the roads has been holding up operations. To date the line runs excluding DUFFELWARD 8760, including DONSBRUGGEN 8757, CLEVE partially cleared by 15 (S) DIVISION, 43 DIVISION on the MATERBON feature, 53 DIVISION up to road running N.E. - S.W. through the REICHSWALD and 51 DIVISION up to the line of the River NIERS. Two Battalions of 7 Para Division have arrived in the South part of the REICHSWALD and two Battalions of 6 Para Division (from ARNHEM) have arrived in CLEVE and to the South.
    1800 Hours Order received no move till 0600 hours then at 2 hours notice to move.

    11 February
    0200 Hours Advance Party for the Battalion ordered to meet Brigade rep at 30 CORPS H.Q. at HATERT at 0930 hours. The following units of the Division only will be taking part in forthcoming operations, under command of 32 BRIGADE:- 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS, 1st Battalion WELSH GUARDS, 2nd Recce Battalion WELSH GUARDS.
    The Battalion is to leave its present locations in two parties, the first consisting of the Battalion H.Q. and the Rifle Companies leaves HAAREN 2636 at 1115 hours and the second consisting of the remainder of the Battalion leaves at 1400 hours.
    Route:- HERTOGENBOSH, HEESCH, GRAVE, Brigade D.P. BR over MAAS-WAAL Canal at 703534 where Advance Party will meet the Battalion and lead it to the Battalion area at GROESBEEK 7655.
    The first half of the Battalion arrived at MALDEN 7055 at 1545 hours after a detour to the north made necessary by the state of the roads, the original route being impassible. Here it was found that the Battalion area had been changed from GROESBEEK to the S.E. half of NIJMEGEN owing to the very dilapidated state of the latter, and finally the column turned about and went into billets in NIJMEGEN with Battalion H.Q. at 713604 - rain, the state of the roads and traffic congestion slowed things up, but the Battalion was finally in its billets by 1930 hours.

    12 February
    1000 Hours Battalion put at 4 hours notice to move.
    1200 Hours Sitrep (as at 0100). The Canadians here cleared the RHINE back up to the railway running North from CLEVE. CLEVE is completely in our hands and so is all but a small portion of the REICHSWALD. GENNEP has been captured and a bridgehead established South of the River NIERS. No further German reinforcements have arrived so far.
    1800 Hours Battalion put at 6 hours notice to move.

    13 February
    0800 Hours Battalion Advance Party left for the GROESBEEK area. The Battalion is to leave NIJMEGEN and move to GROESBEEK starting at 1300 hours.
    1000 Hours Sitrep (as at 0100). In front of CLEVE the line has been pushed forward to the OUDE RIJN. KESSEL has been reached but the bridge over the river has been blown. 60 P.G.R. from 116 Pz Div in MUNCHEN GLADBECK area and 104 P.G.R. from 15 Pz Gren Div in the WESEL area have been identified, also a further Regiment of 7 Para Division.
    1430 Hours Battalion completed move into GROESBEEK area. Battalion H.Q. established at 751556.
    2100 Hours Order received from Brigade H.Q. ’32 BRIGADE will be attacking tomorrow in the GENNEP area. Brigade ‘O’ Group at 2230 hours. Battle recce party to be prepared to move off at 0730 hours. Battalion at 1 hours notice to move from 0730 hours onwards.

    2230 Hours Brigade ‘O’ Group:-
    32 BRIGADE is to come under command of 51 (H) DIVISION and move to GENNEP for an attack to be carried out tomorrow. The object of the attack is to expand the bridgehead over the River NIERS at GENNEP and make room for 52 (L) DIVISION to come in and carry out a series of attacks down the main road towards VENLOW.
    INFORMATION
    Enemy: Opposition on this part of the front has not been very strong. The enemy consist of Battalions of 2 Para Regiment, 180 Division and a Battalion Riegals, all fighting under the command of 7 Para Division.
    Own Troops: 153 Brigade hold the bridgehead with the 1st GORDONS in the HAYEN 7343 area and the 6/7 BLACK WATCH on their left holding up to the railway line 8045.
    154 Brigade are to cross the River NIERS tonight in the area VILLER 8348, with a final objective the line of the railway further South.
    Method: Battalion recce parties will meet the Brigade Commander at H.Q. 153 BRIGADE at CHURCH, OTTERSUM 7846 at 0800 hours tomorrow. The Brigade will move to GENNEP in the order, 2nd Recce Battalion WELSH GUARDS, Y Battery 21 Anti-Tank, 1st Battalion WELSH GUARDS, 32 BRIGADE H.Q., 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, MMG Company, 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS. The Battalion is to pass the S.P. Road Junction 720526 at 0930 hours and debs 783469. From here the Battalion will march to a Concentration Area in the western half of GENNEP.
    Outline of the Brigade Plan:
    Phase One: 1st Battalion WELSH GUARDS will attack on the right and clear and big wood 8043 up to its eastern edge. 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS will attack on the left to capture the ground from 806438 to 809448 (also a small enemy locality to the north of the railway),
    Start line: Behind FDLs of 6/7 GORDONS.
    Phase Two: 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS will pass through 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS and capture HOMMERSUM 8344 and the village of ISSHOVEL 8144. During these attacks the 5th BLACK WATCH will attack and capture BRANTOREN Wood 7943.

    14 February
    0800 Hours The Commanding Officer met the Brigade Commander and viewed the ground from OTTERSUM CHURCH. After this the Commander and Company Commanders recced the Start Line and the Commanding Officer went back to H.Q. 51 DIVISION for a Conference on the fire plan.
    1020 Hours Final Conference at H.Q. (H) DIVISION:-
    It is suspected that the enemy have withdrawn from the objectives of Phase One, and patrols from 6/7 GORDONS area at present investigating this. If this is the case Phase One will be silent and only Phase Two will be supported by fire.
    1145 Hours Battalion 'O' Group at GENNEP.

    Information: As per previous ‘O’ Groups.
    Int.: 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS will attack and capture Point 26.2 and Point 22.7 in the square 8044, Point 24.6 in square 8043.
    Method: Under command 1 Squadron, 2nd Recce Battalion WELSH GUARDS Troop SP Anti-Tank Section ROYAL ENGINEEERS.
    The Battalion will attack with two Companies up, right No. 4 - objective Point 22.7 left No. 2 Company - objective Point 24.6 and the woods around it. No. 3 Company will be in reserve behind No. 4 Company, it will be prepared to clear up the post at 807453 and on consolidation will occupy a position around Point 26.2 and astride the railway. No. 1 Company will be in Battalion reserve and on consolidation will occupy a position in the area of the track at 802445.
    Supporting Arms: 7 Field Regiments, 5 Medium Regiments, and 3 7.2 Anti-Aircraft guns will support the attack if required, firing a programme from H - 25 to H plus 20. 3” Mortars will be in area of S.L. and M.F.C. will go forward with 2 & 4 Companies ready to fire on opposite targetts.
    ROYAL ENGINEERS will concentrate on maintaining the Battalion C.L. They will also be available to clear suspected mines from the railway.
    S.L. behind the dune ridge running N and S from Point 24.3 to Point 28.0 in 7944.
    Battalion C.L. The track running East from the main GENNEP road at ROAD and TRACK JUNCTION 873446.
    H Hour 1530: The Battalion will leave its present area t 1330 horus in the order: 2, 4, H.Q., 3, 1 & Support Companies.
    Admin: F.2. will be established temporarily in the present area. The R.A.P. will move with the Battalion H.Q.
    Intercommunications: Battalion H.Q. will move down the Battalion C.L. behind 2 and 4 Companies and establish itself somewhere in the area of 1 Company.

    1400 Hours Information received from the GORDONS patrols that they and reached Point 22.7 without meeting any opposition and that the attack would therefore be silent. They also reported seeing enemy in the houses at 817437, 818436, and 812433.
    The attack went in at 1530 and met no opposition. By 1615 the Battalion was consolidated on its objective. The leading companies and the WELSH GUARDS tanks saw a number of enemy running away from the houses in 8145 and opened fire on them, which brought in several Germans with their hands up from nearby houses.
    Enemy mortars put down a certain amount of sporadic mortar fire on the Battalion position but caused no casualties and at 1700 hours the 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS passed through to HOMMERSUM.

    At 1900 hours the general situation was as follows:-
    3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS in position in HOMMERSUM having met little opposition and captured many Prisoners of War.
    1st Battalion WELSH GUARDS completed clearing of wood, but having difficulties with mines.
    1st GORDONS - BRANDTOKEN wood successfully captured.
    The total Prisoners of War captured was as follows:-
    15 from I Bn 20 Para Regt 7 Para Div, 7 from Bn Riegals.
    The area of the Battalion attack was a stretch of heather covered and dunes stretching right to the final objective where the sands end and in several prominent dunes and the country to the east becomes flat waterlogged meadows with isolated farmsteads and very little cover. Once on the objective the chief difficulty was maintaining the Battalion with nothing but bad tracks over the dunes to carry the transport of both Battalions.
    The final disposition of the Battalion was as follows:-
    2 Company on dune ridge from 806439 to 807442, 4 Company on dune ridge from 807443 up to pond at 808446, 3 Company astride the railway line at 806850; 1 Company in reserve at 799455. Battalion H.Q. was established in a house at 802446.
    The Squadron 2 Recce Battalion WELSH GUARDS passed to the command of 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS. The SP Anti-Tank guns were placed in 2 Company’s area and the Pl MMGs in the gap between 2 and 4 Companies.
    During the night a few very half-hearted shells fell in the Battalion area.
    The next day was damp with a thick mist and very poor visibility.

    15 February
    Message received from Brigade. 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS are to put in an attack tomorrow through the IRISH GUARDS to capture HASSUM.
    1100 Hours The G.OC. visited the Battalion.
    1415 Hours The Commanding Officer went to HOMMERSUM to recce the Battalion S.L. but a bout of very heavy enemy shelling on the village and a message “to go to Brigade H.Q.” interfered.
    1515 Hours 32 BRIGADE H.Q.:-
    The enemy appear to be very strong in Artillery. HOMMERSUM has been very heavily shelled several times today, also there are some stubborn enemy in the houses to the S and S.E. of the village. In view of the stiffening enemy opposition the Brigade Commander proposes to alter the Battalions objective to the section of defences S. of HOMMERSUM.
    1600 Hours The Brigade Commander went with the Commanding Officer to H.Q. 51 DIVISION:-
    The Battalion’s objective for tomorrow was confirmed as the villages of MULL 828435; STARTENHOF 833437; and KETUT 834433.
    1800 Hours Conference at Brigade H.Q.:-
    Tomorrow there is to be an elaborate series of attacks to take place as follows:-
    1. 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GAURDS attack MULL - STARTENHOF 8343 RETUT 8343 1330 hours;
    2. 157 BRIGADE, 52 DIVISION attack BIGWOOD 8240 1500 hours;
    3. 154 BRIGADE, 51 DIVISION attack Station 8444 1700 hours;
    4. 152 BRIGADE, 51 DIVISION attack ASPERDEN 2000 hours;
    5. 158 BRIGAE, 53 DIVISION attack high ground 8947 2100 hours;
    6. 1st Battalion WELSH GAURDS attack HASSUM 0400 hours;
    7. 43 DIVISION towards PIALZDORF;
    8. 3 CANADIAN DIVISION towards CALCAR.
    The objectes of the 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS attack are to:-
    1. Open up the road to HOMMERSUM from ROAD JUNCTION 786426;
    2. Enable HASSUM to be captured without interferon from the South;
    The Battalion will have under command Squadron 2nd Recce Battalion WELSH GUARDS, Troop SP Anti-Tank, Platoon MMGs, Section ROYAL ENGINEERS.

    16 February
    The beginning of the day was very misty but it cleared before the attack, and after making a recce of S.L. and F.U.P. with Company Commanders the Commanding Officer gave out his orders:-
    1000 hours Battalion ‘O’ Group. Object of attack and information as in previous ‘O’ Groups.
    Int: 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS will attack and capture the following places, BR 830421, Frontier post 553, MULL and WOOD 828435, STARTENHOF and RETUT.
    Method:
    Phase One: Right 1 Company - objectives frontier post 553, knoll 827425, then exploit forward to the two bridges over the Anti-Tank ditch at 832428 and 830422. Left 4 Company - objectives MULL, the Wood north of MULL and the BRIDGE over the Anti-Tank ditch at 832434.
    Phase Two: 3 Company will pass through 4 Company and capture STANTENHOF and RETUT. 2 Company will move up on order and concentrate in reserve in the area of the frontier posts No.s 556, 557, 555.
    S.L. ROAD running N.E. - S.W. through 8143. F.U.P. behind present F.D.Ls.
    Fire Plan: Concentrations have been arranged in fire zones, which move forward from Zone 1 H.15 to Zone 5 H plus 59. To be fired by 4 Field Regiments, 3 Medium and 2 Heavy Batteries. 3” Mortars move up on consolidation and fire on opportunity targets. SP Anti-Tank guns to be in area of 1 Company. Section 6-pounders to 3 Company as soon as possible. Carrier Platoon to be used in admin and carrying capacity. Jeeps and Carriers will be the only vehicles to go forward.
    H Hour 1330.
    Admin: F2 and Rear Battalion H.Q. will be concentrated under the Second-in-Command at present Battalion H.Q. R.A.P. to remain in present location till route back is opened up.
    Intercommunications: Rear Link and Control wireless vehicles will remain behind. Battalion Command Post will move behind 1 Company then R.V. at F.P. 556.
    The ground covered by the attack was completely flat and very open except for the groups of farm buildings. Only very light tracks were available for movement and they soon broke up making administrative problems a most important factor in the Battalion’s plan. The River KENDEL was flooded to about 50 yards wide and the ground generally extremely boggy.
    Part of the attack overran Siegfried defences, consisting of an Anti-Tank ditch about 20” [pencil note - ?] across and with a 4’ embankment. Numerous lengthy communication trenches and in the outposts some wooden and light concrete casements disguised as haystacks. With the exception of the Anti-Tank ditch however the Germans made little use of these earthworks and fought from the houses. A few mines were encountered, but they were badly laid and caused no casualties.
    The Battalion crossed the S.L. at 1330 hours and from then until dusk when other attacks absorbed their attention the enemy put down an almost continuous series of D.F. tasks.
    On the right No. 1 Company successfully cleared the buildings at F.P. 553, but were unable to get up to the Bridge over the Anti-Tank ditch at 840422 * which was very tenaciously held. *[Pencil annotation - See Sketch of Bn posns 16 Feb (829421 ?) ]
    No. 4 Company also cleared their houses and managed to cross the MENDEL by a causeway and get a Platoon over the Anti-Tank ditch. Both these places were under fire, but it was very accurate and caused not a single casualty.
    At 1500 hours No. 3 Company was passed through 4 Company and captured RETUT and STARTENHOF without difficulty, bu they had to clear further on to the houses at 837438 owing to some enemy who gave a certain amount of trouble from there.
    No. 2 Company were brought up at 1600 hours and sent a Platoon to 1 Company who reported enemy forming up to counter attack by the bridge at 840422, but an Artillery shot dealt with this and the Platoon returned later. All but two of the Recce WELSH tanks bogged down after the first few minutes and so did the S.P. guns. However no enemy AFVs were seen.
    At 1630 hours Battalion H.Q. was established in a Farm at 827434 and the position reported consolidated.
    135 Prisoners of War including two officers were captured during the attack. They came from I and II Battalions of 1221 G.R. of 180 Division. Also captured were two 12cm Mortars, 1 7.5 Pak, 6 M.Gs and a great quantity of ammunition.
    The ROYAL ENGINEERS bridged the Anti-Tank ditch but during the night their causeway was swept away.
    2300 Hours Owing to the state of the roads a system of Carrier convoys was organised to bring up the Ammunition and rations from F2 to the companies.
    The Battalion casualties were:- 13 Other Ranks Killed, 27 Other Ranks wounded.

    17 February
    During the day No. 1 Company put a Platoon on the bridge at 832438 and captured three snipers who were causing some trouble. They stated that their Battalion (II/1221 G.R.) had withdrawn during the night to SIEBENGEWALD 8741 and had suffered heavy casualties. This appears to be true as there was no further trouble from the enemy except some very stray shelling.
    The 52 DIVISION attack has not yet reached the end of the wood 8340.
    51 DIVISION have captured ASPERDEN 9338.

    18 February
    Heavy rain during the night made the roads very much worse and two Weasels have been lent to the Battalion to help bring up supplies.
    1 Company occupied the BRIDGE at 830422* with a Platoon. *[Pencil annotation - see note (3 pages back) [earlier]
    This was recced by day, found clear and occupied at dusk. The Platoon contacted the 5th H.L.I. who have now reached the end of the wood at 8340. A Platoon from 2 Company has gone to 1 Company to hold the position vacated by the right hand Platoon.

    19 February
    0430 Hours An enemy patrol got into No. 4 Company area and fired off a great deal of ammunition before withdrawing an hour later. One of the Platoon Commanders was seriously wounded during the engagement.
    1130 Hours A heavy and accurate shoot came down on the Anti-Tank ditch crossing. It was suspected that there might be a connection between this and the patrol of last night, and that there might be someone directing the shoot from the houses in no-man’s land, which were accordingly shot up with MMG.
    This flushed one German who was trying to desert. He gave the following information:- ‘He was the Commanding Officer’s servant, and a member of last night’s patrol. The patrol was 25 strong led by a Sergeant and had been given the mission of recapturing some of the arms and ammunition that they had left behind in the buildings occupied by No. 4 Company.
    They failed to do this and the patrol returned only 21 strong, so he presumes that four were wounded and could not get back. His Battalion (II/1221 G.R.) was in SIEBENGEWALD digging in but living in the houses. Battalion H.Q. was given as a house at 864411. He knew of an outpost with an Anti-Tank gun in the orchard at 847417 and said the road at F.P. 550 was mined. He thought H.Q. 180 Division was in WEEZE.
    1400 Hours The Platoon of 2 Company under command 1 Company returned to 2 Company, as Brigade have given permission for the Platoon of 1 Company on the bridge at 830422 to pull back and cover this ground from 827425 with an MMG Section. They have a patrol out on the road at 827423 by night.
    1600 Hours A Recce Patrol found by 2 Company left from 2 Company and went via X TRACKS 833423 to the WOOD at 827428 and back by the bridge at 827424. No enemy were seen. A few very poorly laid mines were picked up from the road at 833427 by 1 Company the patrol went out.
    1800 Hours Sitrep. GOCH has been captured by 153 BRIGADE and 15 (S) DIVISION. 153 BRIGADE are expected to push on to BOYENHOF 8840 tomorrow. 52 DIVISION is to attack down the road from GENNEP starting on the 22nd.

    20 February
    At 1300 hours tomorrow the 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS are to attack and capture VRIJ 8541 and PIEESHOF 8671.
    S.L. for the attack the Anti-Tank ditch in 8342. To protect the S.L. two Platoons of 1 Company are to hold the bridges over the Anti-Tank ditch at 832427 and 830422. Also 2 Company are to sent a recce patrol out at 1900 hours, to see whether the houses from 848420 along the road to 845415 are occupied. The Platoon MMGs under the Battalions command will be giving covering fire and the Commanding Officer has arranged to help with R.A.F. and Prisoners of War arrangements.
    It is planned that in the next few days the Battalion will go back to MOOK and join 5th BRIGADE who move there today with the 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS who will be relieved by 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS.
    2100 Hours The Patrol from 2 Company were ambushed at frontier post 579 - 849249. Pencil note 549 - 849419.
    The enemy opened fire at them from a house on the left of the road at very close range, killing the patrol commander Lieutenant T.R. SYMONS and wounding another of the patrol who was captured.

    21 February
    1000 Hours 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS relieved 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS in HOMMERSUM.
    1300 Hours 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS attack began.
    1600 Hours The first objectives were captured with comparatively slight opposition, the main difficulties being reported as mines and enemy Artillery fire. From VRIJ 8541 onwards the enemy held their ground against all attacks and in the region of PIRON 8641 the IRISH GUARDS were not able to get on to their final objectives.
    The two Platoons of 1 Company holding the bridges over the Anti-Tank ditch are to remain in position until 2200 hours to allow the IRISH GUARDS to withdraw back through them.
    1900 Hours - 2200 Hours IRISH GUARDS withdrawing through 1 Company.
    This operation was successfully carried out, except for a few bogged vehicles which had to be abandoned, and it is hoped it will be possible to recover them tomorrow.
    During the night enemy mortars and an SP gun carried out intermittent shoots, but otherwise the enemy made no other moves.

    22 February
    1000 Hours Recce parties from 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS arrived at Battalion H.Q.
    1400 Hours - 1500 Hours The Battalion was relieved by the 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS and moved back to their area at HOMMERSUM 8443.
    1800 Hours The Battalion is to join the rest of the DIVISION in the NIJMEGEN area tomorrow. Recce parties to leave at 0930 hours. the Battalion will follow at 1300 hours.

    23 February
    0100 Hours Order received from BRIGADE - previous arrangements cancelled. Battle Recce parties to report to H.Q. 15 (S) DIVISION 905458 at 1130 hours. The Battalion to be prepared to move at 1200 hours. the Battalion will be under command 5 BRIGADE which will consist of 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS, [Struck out by pencil - 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS] 2nd Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS. [Added in pencil - 2nd and 3rd Battalions IRISH GUARDS].
    1100 Hours The Commanding Officer and Recce Group left for H.Q. 15 (S) DIVISION just north of GOCH. The Battalion is to take over the area of the village of BOCHHOLT 9343 at present held by the A&SH. BUCHOLT was captured a few days ago when the GOCH and CALCAR road was cut. Today on the right another Brigade of 15 (S) DIVISION is attacking south through the big woods along the east bank of the River NIERS. On the left the 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS are taking over in the area of MEISENHOF 9544 and BOTTER 9545. The 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS are in reserve. The Battalion will have a squadron of tanks from the 2nd Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS under command.
    1930 Hours The Battalion left HOMMERSUM and went via GENNEP, KESSEL 8446, ASPERDEN 8745, and GOCH to CROSSROADS 910477. It was intended to debus the Battalion in GOCH, but the column was waved on past the D.P. over thirty minutes early so that Companies and the Recce Group couldn’t be joined together again till the CROSSROADS where the Battalion was finally halted at 2330 hours. From the CROSSROADS the companies marched to the Battalion position and the vehicles were split into F.2 and the TCLs which were sent to an area at 904476 and F.1 which remains with the Battalion.
    Owing to the nature of the position it is only possible to get vehicles up to the Companies by night, as they are under observation and movement is liable to bring down a great deal of accurate shelling. The roads and tracks leading to the Companies are only passable in Carriers and Jeeps, and so on arrival Carriers from the Carrier Platoon were off-loaded and used to carry the Company rations, blankets etc off the battle wagons. A nightly Carrier Convoy down the companies is to be the method of supplying them while the Battalion is here.

    24 February
    BUCHOLT and the two hamlets of KEMPKESHOF 9544 and BREMERSHOF 9544 also held by the Battalion, lied on the forward slope of a small ridge running N.E. - S.W. along the line of a belt of woods. The enemy occupy the next ridge across. The A&SH have not done any patrolling but the position opposite is known to be held by the remnants of 84 Division and enemy movement has been seen in FELEMANNSHOF 9644. The wood at 964437 and HERRINGSCHEHOF 9643. The road going S.E. behind these farms to the village of KEPPELN 9844 is used as a run for S.P. guns and mobile MinnenWerfers that periodically shell the Battalion position. Probably all of the farmsteads opposite us are occupied and the enemy has got very good observation so that movement by day has to be restricted to the barest minimum.

    The position held is as follows:-
    3 Company hold the area of BUCHOLT, with two Platoons forward of the wood and one behind at 950439. There are two 6-pounders and a Section of 3” Mortars in the company area. The nearest neighbours on the right are the 10th H.L.I. who have a position in LINDAHLSHOF 9543. Next comes 2 Company holding KEMPKESHOF and BREMERSHOF. There are two 6-pounders in their area and their Section of Mortars is back in the area of 4 Company on the left. 4 Company area in the aree of the FARM at 943447. By night they send a Platoon forward to a small horseshoe wood at 955445. There are two 17-pounders and one 6-pounder in their area. The nearest troops on the left are a company of 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS in MEUSENHOF 947447. 1 Company is in reserve at 950445.
    Two more 17-pounders are in position back on the main road near Battalion H.Q. which is at 945443. The Squadron of tanks is also held back in reserve.
    During the morning the enemy were quieter than usual, but in the afternoon a number of accurate shoots were put down on the Battalion H.Q. and Support Company area. Later the enemy turned their attention on to the Company positions and an SP gun was in action. A good deal of shelling went on during the early part of the night and then things were quiet again.
    On the 26th a series of attacks begin to capture UDEM. 11th ARMOURED DIVISION and the Canadians will be carrying out this operation. Meanwhile from 1400 hours tomorrow till 1400 hours 27th all traffic on the roads in the Brigade area is prohibited while the necessary preparatory moves are carried out.
    No patrols were sent out by the Battalion.

    25 February
    During the morning the enemy were quieter than usual, but started shelling the forward Companies in the afternoon, and went on till late at bight when two SP guns cased a certain amount of trouble. A house occupied by Support Company received a direct hit causing several casualties.
    No patrols were sent out.

    26 February
    Operation BLOCBUSTER.
    The Operation began at 0430 hours. The following are the phases:-
    Phase One: 0430 hours.
    2 CANADIAN DIVISION - objective high ground S.E. of CALCAR.
    3 CANADIAN DIVISION - objective to outflank KERELN.
    Phase Two: 0800 hours.
    3 CANADIAN DIVISION - objective KEPELN.
    4 CANADIAN ARMOURED DIVISION - high ground 0044.
    Phase Three: (untimed)
    3 CANADIAN DIVISION - objective UDEM.
    4 CANADIAN ARMOURED DIVISION - objective high ground 0043.
    11 ARMOURED DIVISION - high ground S. of UDEM.
    Phase Four: (untimed)
    4 CANADIAN ARMOURED DIVISION - HOCHWALD 0540.
    11 ARMOURED DIVISION - high ground N. of SONSBEEK 0535.
    3 BRITISH - KERVENHEIM 9938 WINNEKENDONK 9934 and KEVELAER 8632.
    GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION to out GELDERN - WESEL ROAD in area of ALPEN 1531.
    Phase One and Two were completed by 1200 hours, and at 1800 hours the SCOTS GREYS and the 2nd K.R.R.C. of 11 ARMOURED DIVISION passed through the Battalion and by first light were established on the railway West of UDEM 9841. UDEM was also reported completely clear in the early hours of the morning.
    During the day and most of the night the enemy continued to put down shells in the Battalion area, but with the capture of UDEM and the second day of BLOCKBUSTER there was peace and quiet.

    27 February
    There are several enemy minefields in the Battalion area and these are now being cleared up by the Pioneer Platoon. No casualties have been caused to the Battalion by them, but a Carrier of the K.O.S.B. was blown up and all the minefields have not been located yet for certain.
    Sitrep. The attack by 3rd BRITISH DIVISION had begun and reached the end of the woods 9740. The 4th CANADIAN DIVISION has reached the edge of the HOCHWALD. Some progress has been made in front of UDEM, but opposition has been determined and conditions have made the going slow.

    28 February
    The ban on road travel has been lifted. All the non essential Battalion vehicles were sent back to F2 prior to the start of BLOCKBUSTER so as to avoid losing any in the retaliatory enemy shelling, and these were brought up again in the afternoon.
    Companies have been able to move into the houses in their areas, and though they are all very damaged there are sufficient to provide cover for all.
    32 GUARDS BRIGADE have now come out of battle, but are still under command of 52 DIVISION, and as yet there is not news of the reforming of the DIVISION or timing of future moves.
     
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    MAPS

    5CG postions, 14 Feb 1945: S.E. of Gennep
    Screen Shot 2015-05-31 at 15.41.12.png

    5CGpositions, 16 Feb 1945: Mull, Retut
    Screen Shot 2015-05-31 at 13.57.49.png

    5CG positions 24 Feb 1945, Bucholt, NE of Goch
    Screen Shot 2015-05-31 at 16.02.45.png
     
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    APPENDIX
    NOMINAL ROLL OF OFFICERS AND WARRANT OFFICERS BY COMPANIES
    1ST FEBRUARY 1945

    BATTALION H.Q.
    Lieutenant-Colonel E.R. HILL DSO - Commanding Officer
    Major M.E. ADEANE - Second-in-Command
    Captain J.N. AGNEW - Adjutant
    Captain J. PEREIRA - Intelligence Officer
    Captain & Quartermaster S.B.R. COOPER - Quartermaster
    Captain J.B. INGRAM, ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS - Medical Officer
    Captain Reverend R.H. TOMLINSON, ROYAL ARMY CHAPLAINS DEPARTMENT - Padre
    R.S.M. R.W. SMITH DCM - Regimental Sergeant Major
    R.Q.M.S. E. LOVEJOY - Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant
    Drill Sergeant R. SKELLS
    Drill Sergeant J. COWLEY DCM

    H.Q. COMPANY
    Captain A. GIBBS - Company Commander, H.Q. Company
    Lieutenant A.K. FEILING - Signal Officer
    Lieutenant M. BONSEY - M.T.O.
    Lieutenant P.R. SPURGIN - Pioneer Officer
    C.S.M. A SEATHERTON - Company Sergeant Major, H.Q. Company
    C.Q.M.S. T. CONNELLY - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, H.Q. Company

    NO. 1 COMPANY
    Major D.A. KENNARD MC - Company Commander, 1 Company
    Captain A.B. PEMBERTON - Second-in-Command, 1 Company
    Lieutenant J.G.B. CHESTER - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    Lieutenant E.R. FIFOOT - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    Lieutenant T.A. MATHESON - Anti-Tank Platoon Second-in-Command
    C.S.M. F FARNHILL DCM - Company Sergeant Major, 1 Company
    C.Q.M.S. R. PATERSON - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 1 Company

    NO. 2 COMPANY
    Major The Honourable D.M.G.J. WILLOUGHBY - Company Commander, 2 Company
    Captain W.J. STRAKER SMITH - Second-in-Command, 2 Company
    Lieutenant The Honourable P.A. STRUTT - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant D.E. PLATER - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant T.R. SYMONS - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    C.S.M. G. WHYTE - Company Sergeant Major, 2 Company
    C.Q.M.S. B. AYRES - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 2 Company

    NO. 3 COMPANY
    Captain D.I.T. EASTMAN MC - Company Commander, 3 Company
    Captain The Earl of PLYMOUTH - Second-in-Command, 3 Company
    Lieutenant J.A.F. NORTHCOTT - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    Lieutenant R.F. MONTAGUE - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    Lieutenant E.I. WINDSOR-CLIVE - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    C.S.M. S. BERRY - Company Sergeant Major, 3 Company
    C.Q.M.S. A. TOWNSEND - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 3 Company

    NO. 4 COMPANY
    Major J.d’H. HAMILTON - Company Commander, 4 Company
    Captain I.O. LIDDELL - Second-in-Command, 4 Company
    Lieutenant C.N. ACHESON GRAY - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    Lieutenant M.W. WALL - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    Lieutenant G.D. WAUHOPE - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    C.S.M. N. REID - Company Sergeant Major, 4 Company
    C.Q.M.S. F. MARSDEN - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 4 Company

    SUPORT COMPANY
    Major G.B. MACKEAN - Company Commander, Support Company
    Captain J.T. PAGET - Mortar Platoon Commander
    Captain B. BLOWER - Carrier Platoon Commander
    Lieutenant M. BENDIX - Anti-Tank Platoon Commander
    Lieutenant The Honourable J.J. ORMSBY-GORE - Mortar Platoon Second-in-Command
    C.S.M. G. TILLING - Company Sergeant Major, Support Company
    C.Q.M.S. T. CONNELLY - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, Support Company

    ON ATTACHMENT
    Lieutenant E. STRAGHAN - Attached H.Q. GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION
    Lieutenant C.M. MANDER - Attached 40 R.H.U.
    Lieutenant M. BONSEY - Attached 40 R.H.U.


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    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 7
    Friday, 9th February, 1945

    THE WESTERN FRONT.
    Yesterday morning our forward troops attacked from GROESBEEK east of NIJMEGEN towards the REICHSWALD FOREST and CLEVE. Advances up to 3,500 yards had been made by the afternoon. Opposition is reported as being only “fairly strong”. Prisoners of War were giving themselves up in batches of 40 - 5- at a time.
    The attack was proceded by an air raid on GOCH and CLEVE delivered by 700 Lancasters. Throughout the day good flying weather prevailed. Medium and fighter bombers were out in strength.
    The American 1st and 3rd Armies have made more progress through the SIEGFRIED LINE, the former closing in to 2 1/2 miles from the last of the all important ROER DAMS still in German hands.

    THE EASTERN FRONT.
    The Germans have again reported the presence of a Russian bridgehead over the ODER river due east of BERLIN. They stated that the Russians had enlarged it against furious opposition. As year MOSCOW have made no mention of this crossing of the ODER.
    At one point Marshal ZHUKOV’s forces are just over 30 miles from BERLIN.
    In EAST PRUSSIA another slice had been taken from what little remains to the Germans. The town of KREUZBURG has been seized, 12 miles due south of KOENIGSBERG.
    In the South, Marshal KONIEVE had deepened his bridgehead over the ODER south east of BRESLAY.

    GERMAN LOSSES - RUSSIAN CLAIMS.
    Below are the official Soviet statistics of German losses for the period 12 - 24 January on the Eastern Front:-
    DESTROYED
    442 planes
    2138 tanks
    3490 guns
    2960 mortars
    9570 M.Gs
    24,960 vehicles
    CAPTURED
    150 planes
    875 tanks
    4442 guns
    4426 mortars
    16,449 M.Gs
    9059 vehicles
    86,330 Prisoners of War
    295,000 troops killed

    THEY HAVE MET AT LAST.
    Prime Minister CHURCHILL, President ROOSEVELT and Marshall STALIN have met in the BLACK SEA area.
    A communique issued, stated that final decisions for the destruction of NAZI GERMANY had been reached unanimously. The Chiefs of Staff were now working out detailed plans.
    The occupation of GERMANY after the war was another subject on the agenda. Complete agreement was reached as to the best methods to be employed.
    A tragedy marred the Conference in that a plane carrying some of Mr CHURCHILL’s military and civilian staff crashed en route to the meeting place. Both crew and passengers are reported as missing - n names have been published as yet.

    B.B.C. NEWS.
    NEW ASSAULT NOW ANNOUNCED.
    The B.B.C. have now announced the new assault into GERMANY on a five mile front south east of NIJMEGEN between the River MAAS and the RHINE which was launched yesterday morning by British and Canadian troops of the 1st Canadian Army.
    The attack was marked by an 11 hour artillery barrage and by strong air support.
    In the ARDENNES American 1st Army troops have re-captured the town of SCHMIDT.
    American 3rd Army men have consolidated their 10 bridgeheads across the rivers OUR and SURE.

    BOMBER COMMAND OUT AGAIN.
    R.A.F. Bomber Command were over GERMANY in very great strength last night. The synthetic oil plant at POLITZ 7 miles north of STETTIN was one target. Mosquitoes bombed BERLIN.

    RUSSIANS PUSH ON TOWARDS STARGARD.
    Russian forces have pushed on towards the town of STARGARD 20 miles east of STETTIN.
    Marshal KONIEV's troops have enlarged their wide bridgehead over the upper ODER.

    IN BRIEF.
    In ITALY 5the Army troops have made more gains in the SERCHIO VALLEY and in the hills south east of BOLOGNIA. American heavy bombers from ITALY yesterday attacked communications in the VIENNA area.

    In BURMA British 14th Army troops 40 miles north of MANDALAY have widened their bridgehead over the IRRAWADDY.

    General MACARTHUR’s men are mopping up the remaining Japanese in MANILA.

    BATTALION P.O.Ws.
    Since our last issue information has been received that the following personnel are known to be
    PRISONERS OF WAR
    2662119 Lance-Sergeant N. HOLDSHIP (3 Company)
    2666458 Guardsman E. YEOMANN (3 Company)
    14686589 Guardsman R. COPPIN (3 Company)
    2658214 Lance-Corporal J. BOULTON (3 Company)
    2666254 Guardsman E. SINGLETON (3 Company)

    WITHOUT COMMENT.
    With reference to Colonel BECKER an S.S. Officer notorious for his ruthlessness. A few days ago Colonel BECKER remarked to a soldier, in a rare moment of camaraderie:-
    "If you’re going to get it, you’re going to get it. The bullet meant for me hasn’t been made yet and won’t be for 10 years.”
    With this pronouncement the Colonel darted nimbly into a building to avoid an oncoming shell.

    STOP PRESS.
    In the new attack by British and Canadian troops all yesterday’s objectives were captured.


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    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 8
    Saturday, 10th February, 1945

    B.B.C. NEWS.
    THE WESTERN FRONT.
    Canadian and United Kingdom troops in their new attack have widened their fron to six miles. Forward units are about five miles into German territory. They have broken through the first SEIGFRIED defence line and are well into the REICHSWALD FOREST.
    Canadians on the left flank are clearing the flooded area between the northern edge of the Forest and the RHINE.
    At the other end of the Western Front American and French troops have smashed all organised resistance south of STRASBOURG.
    In the ARDENNES American 1st Army troops were last report 1/2 mile from the biggest ROER River dam.
    American 3rd Army troops are covering the last 3/4 miles to PRUM.

    ELBING SURROUNDED.
    Russian troops in EAST PRUSSIA have surrounded ELBING and captured a town on the coast less than 20 miles to the north east. South of KONIGSBERG they have taken 30 more places.
    To the west the Russians have driven nearer to STETTIN. The Germans say that Marshal KONIEV is making a big attack on BRESLAU.

    HEAVY RAIDS YESTERDAY.
    About 1,300 American heavy bombers yesterday attacked a synthetic oil plant and arms factories, a marshalling yard and other targets in GERMANY.
    From ITALY Fortresses and Liberators bombed oil targets near VIENNA.

    HAND TO HAND FIGHTING IN ITALY.
    The 8th Army front in ITALY has flared up along the River SENIO with hand to hand fighting by raiding parties and increased artillery fire.
    Allied warships in the Mediterranean have shelled shore targets near the FRENCH - ITALIAN border.

    IN BRIEF.
    In BURMA 14th Army troops are approaching important oil fields about 100 miles south west of MANDALAY.
    East African troops are enar the oil town of CHAUK.
    In MANILA American airborne troops have been in fierce house to hous fighting with the Japanese in the southern part of the city.
    On the BATAAN Peninsula American troops have reached the town of MORON.
    American heavy bombers have attacked FORMOSA.

    THE WESTERN FRONT.
    The line now runs exclusive DUFFELWARD 8760, excl DONSBRUGGEN 8657, excl the road to HEKKENS 8347 and about a mile short of GENNEP.
    CLEVE was entered early this morning but is not yet completely cleared, the going being extremely difficult owing to the cratered and broken state of the roads. Over the whole sector bad roads continue to be the main cause of delay, but the enemy appears to have got over his initial surprise and various reinforcements have been put into the battle today.

    The most important identification is of 20 Para Regiment of 7 Para Division, two Battalions of which are now in action in the southern portion of the REICHSWALD.
    84 Divisino is now very much reduced in strength and probably only worth about 3 Battalions. A Battalion of 16 Para Division is fighting in CLEVE. These troops were brought from the other end of the Island and ferried across the RHINE at EMMERICH. The other new arrival is a reserve Battalion of 180 Division which has come into action in the MATERBON area.
    The rest of 7 Para Division may be on its way and there are probably various other reserve Battalions from 180 and 190 Division still to come.
    In general the enemy appear to have decided to fight things out on the present line that they now hold, and are committing every Battalion as it arrives.



    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 9
    Monday, 12th February, 1945

    THE WESTERN FRONT.
    Yesterday further good progress was made. The Canadians have pushed on along the banks of the RHINE up to the line of the railway running due north out of CLEVE, and today they are pushing on towards the ferries opposite EMMERICH. It was by means of these ferries that the Battalions of 6 Para Division arrived at CLEVE and they will now have to add further mileage to the already considerable bicycle journey that they have had from ARNHEM.
    CLEVE is virtually clear of the enemy and to the south of the town we have advanced several miles down the main road towards GOCH. It was in this region that a Battalion of 6 Para Division after forming up for an attack marched over to our lines and gave themselves up headed by their Commanding Officer. The reason they gave for this surprising action was that they had received no rations and didn’t propose to go hungry any longer.
    Little of the REICHSWALD FOREST still remains to be cleared up and we are now fighting on the extreme eastern edge, while on the southern flank we have captured the vital crossroads in the village of HESKINS and line the banks of the River NIERS from here.
    Westwards GENNEP was captured with little opposition and we have now got a strong bridgehead south of the river in this area.
    More units of 7 Para Division have arrived and must be expected to continue arriving in the future, but despite this and the slightly increasing enemy opposition our rate of advance has been accelerated, and as more and better roads come under control the going can be expected to become better still.

    TAILPIECES.
    1. From an Air Ministry Intelligence Summary:-
    “German soldiers refere to their female colleagues as “Blitzenmaedels” a term which evokes a wide vista of associations. The ladies are also known as mattresses of various kinds: “Offiziermatratze”, “Feldmatratze” and plain “Matratze”.
    2. A Prisoner of War’s explanation of why the Germans fight so hard in the West:
    “If we don’t fight, the Russians will meet the Americans in GERMANY. Naturally they will fight each other, and we don’t want our beloved Germany to become a theatre of war.”
    3. 84 Fus Battalion - 8 February’
    “Many Germans were found with kits packed sitting in dug outs in soft caps waiting to be taken prisoner.”


    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 10
    Tuesday, 13th February, 1945

    LATEST BATTLE NEWS.
    The main advance of yesterday was in front of CLEVE where we have pushed forward to the line of the OUDE RHINE and captured the villages of GRIETHAUSEN and KELLEN. South of CLEVE we are on the outskirts of HAU. The bridge over the NIERS at KESSEL has been reached but was found to have been blown. Our bridgehead over the river at GENNEP has been enlarged and the bridging operations have been completed.
    The main enemy event is the arrival of two very significant reinforcements - 60 PGR of 116 Pz Division has come up from MUNCHENGLADBACH, and 104 PGR of 15 Pz Gren Division has arrived from the WESEL area. Another Regiment of 7 Para Division has also been identified.
    From this one may deduct that the Germans take an extremely serious view of the present operations and are putting in all they have got to stop it. It remains to be seen if, and when, the rest of 116 Pz Division and 15 Pz Gren Division arrive. To date the result of all t his is a somewhat natural stiffening opposition.

    SEE NIJMEGEN.
    NIJMEGEN is one of the eldest towns in HOLLAND and in the days when the Romans were straightening out the roads - “the rolling English Drunkard” made, NIJMEGEN under the name of NEOMAGNUS was precariously holding out against the Romans as an independent city.
    Charlemagne whose capital city was AACHEN or, as the B.B.C would call it AIX LA CHAPPEL, built a palace for himself here but its all been knocked down since those days.
    The heroic period of Dutch history is the rise of the Dutch Republic in the late sixteenth century. The NETHERLANDS a domain of Catholic Habsburg Spain was largely on the side of the Reformation, and religious difference lead to a war of independence, the long course of which marks the birth of modern HOLLAND and the story of which is chaptered by the individual swages, liberations, and particular fates of HOLLAND’s many cities. The leading protagonists were - on our left William the Silent for HOLLAND and Heresy and on our right Duke ALBA of SPAIN for Habsburg King PHILIP and Catholicism - at all events NIJMEGEN was for some reason on the Catholic side and a picturesque story is told of the defeat of an attempt to capture it by the Republic’s forces under Colonel SCHENK. He boated across the RHINE under cover of darkness, but his landing was unfortunately discovered by a guest at, whatever the equivalent of a company dance was in those days, who going outside to cool himself stumbled upon the disembarking soldiery.
    The whole city work to life, and in particular one Clara WANRAY who seized a trumpet and blew such a blast that the attackers were put to flight in terror and Colonel SCHENK was drowned. The town was eventually captured by MAURITA in 1591.
    In 1672 the United Netherlands found themselves at war with LOUIS XIV “le Roi Soleil” of FRANCE and after an unfortunate let down by “Great Brit Inc” who honoured their treaty in the breach the Republic lost round one and NIJMEGEN was captured by the great French Marchal TUREEN.
    I can then find no considerable event in the town’s history till we redeemed our honour by liberating the city A.D. 1944.
    If you feel a desire to see the sights, the chief item is the St. Stevenskirk built in 1545, which stands in the Market Place, the historical hub of the city. The Gemeente Museum has a Houton Ruck, a wooden tub for the punishment of unchastity, and also a Volter Kist, whatever that may be, for the same purpose, both a product of the Reformation.

    [hr]

    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 11
    Friday, 16th February, 1945

    GREAT DEVASTATION IN TOKIO.
    Admiral NIMITZ announced early today that a powerful task force of the PACIFIC FLEET was attacking targets at TOKIO.
    Correspondents said 1,200 carrier planes were hitting TOKIO causing great devastation. The naval force includes many carriers and battle ships operating about 300 miles from TOKIO.
    Some of the warships have been shelling IWO JIMA in the Volcanos and other Japanese positions in the BONINS.
    Earlier American super Fortresses from the MARIANNAS went to NAGOY Japan’s third largest city, to bomb a big aircraft plant.

    KONIEV's 30 MILE DRIVE.
    In EASTERN GERMANY Marshall KONIEV’s men have swept into BRANDENBURG towards the flank of the Germans facing Marshal ZHUKOV on the ODER.
    KONIEV's drive covered 30 miles yesterday.
    In the former Polish Corridor the Russians have captured the traffic centre of CHOJNICE.

    AMERICAN HEAVIES OUT.
    American heavy bombers from BRITAIN flew yesterday to EASTERN GERMANY where 450 of them hammered COTTBUS less than 30 miles from Marshal KONIEV’s spearheads.
    200 more of the heavies gave DRESDEN another battering and 300 others attacked an oil plant near MAGDEBURG.
    Heavies from ITALY again bombed targets near VIENNA.

    CANADIANS REACH THE RHINE.
    In the West troops of the Canadian 1st Army have reached the RHINE opposite EMMERICH.
    South of the REICHSWALD Scottish troops have captured the town of KESSEL four miles from GOCH.
    A new attack by the American 7th Army has gained over one mile on a five mile front east of SARREGUEINES.

    IN BRIEF.
    The British Government’s Bill for family allowances after the war will provide 5/- for each child after the first in each family.

    Mr. CHURCHILL has received the freedom of ATHENS.

    In BURMA British tanks headed by night across the IRRAWADDY went into action with British and Indian infantry, and have broken through to SINGU on the road leading to MANDALAY.

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    KILLED IN ACTION
    5104312 Guardsman H. PALMER (Support Company)
    WOUNDED
    2666566 Guardsman G. WHITENSTALL (3 Company)
    ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL
    14202318 Guardsman J. MORGAN (2 Company)
    2665758 Guardsman J. WARBURTON (2 Company)
    2663892 Guardsman H. MARTIN (4 Company)
    2665918 Guardsman J. BATEMAN (4 Company)

    2657328 Guardsman A. DYSON (2 Company)


    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 12
    Saturday, 17th February, 1945

    B.B.C. NEWS.
    THE WESTERN FRONT.
    In the West Allied aircraft yesterday flew oer 3,500 sorties many of them in support of British forces advancing between the RHINE and the MAAS.
    R.A.F. Lancasters hit WESEL on the east bank of the RHINE.
    Our tactical aircraft attacked road controls used to supply the German Garrison at GOCH.
    Over 1,000 American heavies bombed oil and rail targets in North West GERMANY.
    There was tough fighting on the Canadian 1st Army front where units of eight German Divisions are in action.

    BRESLAU SURROUNDED.
    Marshal KONIEV's men yesterday gained another 15 miles on the BERLIN side of the ODER. They are rapidly pushing to Marshal ZHUKOV’s southern flank and the two Amy Groups are said to have made contact.
    BRESLAU is now surrounded by the Russians.

    MORE ATTACKS ON TOKIO.
    The 1,500 carrier planes of the U.S. 5th Fleet have continued their attacks on the TOKIO area.
    An air observer saw smoke billowing high over the TOKIO and YOKOHAMA area.

    BIG CONVOY REACHES RUSSIA.
    Another big convoy has been escorted to RUSSIA without loss by British naval vessels which fought off ‘U’ Boat and air attacks. Two ‘U’ Boats were sunk.

    IN BRIEF.
    In WASHINGTON both Houses of Congress have passed the George Bill providing for the withdrawal of Federal Lending Agencies from the Commerce Department.

    The American Air Chief General ARNOLD has congratulated Australian airmen on their activities in the SOUTH WEST PACIFIC.

    In BURMA British and Indian troops have enlarged their IRRAWADDY bridgehead north of MANDALAY and are pressing on from there.

    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 13
    Sunday, 18th February, 1945

    MESSAGE FROM THE COMMANDING OFFICER.
    I wish to congratulate everyone on their performance on the 16th, and by everyone I mean exactly that; not only the Company, Platoon and Section Commanders but every Guardsman who advanced without hesitation to final objective through the heavy enemy defensive fire.
    The Brigadier has asked me to send you all his congratulations and those of our Divisional Commander who watched the whole attack from some high ground.
    Also the Commander of the Division with which we were then operating most kindly found time yesterday to visit us in order to send you his congratulations and thanks “for having fought such a fine battle”.
    The secret of your success lay in each man’s determination to get on regardless of cost and the result is a force which no German action has yet been able to stop or will be able to, until the fighting is over and may that day now be not long delayed.

    HOW THE BATTLE WENT.
    The Battalion's attack the day before yesterday was the first item of a very considerable programme of attacks, and the list of operations handed to us just before the battle and resembling a menu for an eight course dinner was almost imposing affair with ourselves heading the list.
    There has been a certain amount of argument as to whether the attack ought to be called after the village of MULL which we captured just across the German frontier or referred to as breaching the SIEGFRIED LINE, which we are also quite entitled to claim. My purely personal view is that MULL is the first village on GERMAN soil captured by a COLDSTREAM Battalion for a great many years and is therefore of more significance than the SIEGFRIEND LINE which a great many people have operated against and in the British sector is a very bogus affair compared with what the Americans dealt with near AACHEN.
    The SIEGFRIED LINE proper ends at MUNCHEN GLADBACH and from here northwards the German defences are only a hastily made extension mostly constructed by conscript civilian labour; nonetheless in case people at a future date argue that there was nothing here at all it would be perhaps a good thing to give a rough outline of the actual defences we encountered.
    In front of the line several mock haystacks were spread across the countryside, camouflaged extremely well with straw so as to be quite undistinguishable for the article they were, actually think concrete casements built to hold a section and complete with a store for heating and cooking purposes.
    No. 4 Company who led the attack on the right and overran several of them report that happily none were actually occupied during the attack. Next came a more or less continuous trench which ran from the overflowed dyke on our right southwards. A very ineffective affair presumably made for intercommunication and cover between the groups of farm buildings from which the enemy actually fought. It was certainly not used to fight from and does not seem to have been of any value though it must have taken a lot of labour to construct. Finally there was an 8 yard wide Anti-Tank ditch, a genuine enough obstacle, though in practise the ground everywhere was so boggy as to prove a complete obstacle to our supporting tanks the minute they left the far from firm going provided by the roads and tracks.
    The defenders were all from 122 and Grenadier Regiment and though they fought a lot better than Battalion Riegals whom we met the day before they were not up to the standards of six months ago and we had more casualties from the considerable defensive Artillery fire that the enemy put down than from the enemy infantry.
    No. 4 Company forced their way over the floods via a very doubtful causeway and also over the Anti-Tank ditch both of which were under fire at the time, without a single casualty.
    The most stubborn defence was met by No. 1 Company in the area of an small bridge over the Anti-Tank ditch that was in their area. The enemy were very strongly placed here and were at one moment reported to be forming up for a counter attack, so No. 1 Company were ordered to call off the attacks on it. However heavy stinks were put down in this area and nothing come of any threat that was impending.
    After No. 4 and No. 1 Companies reached their objectives No. 3 Company passed through over the Anti-Tank ditch and captured STARTENHOF and RETUT. Actually the closely strung groups of farm buildings made much further and wider mopping up actions necessary which they successfully accomplished.
    Darkness was coming on towards the end of things, the enemy Artillery action died down, and as we have since discovered the bulk of the enemy withdrew to SIEBENGEWALD leaving only a few snipers behind, and the WELSH GUARDS captured HASSUM at four in the morning without meeting opposition.
    An unusual enemy weapon was reported by No. 2 Company and their description of the incident is corroborated by the IRISH GUARDS. Whatever the shell or rocked used by the enemy was, in this case half a dozen landed without any preliminary warning whistle, and the blast and crater made by this unknown weapon was reported to be very considerable. No explanation of this has yet been found and any further information would be gratefully received, particularly bits of whatever it was that came down.
    The final count of prisoners came to 152 Other Ranks and two Officers, which with the exception of ARRAS and the days of the “Great Swan” when we got over 3,000 is about our third best bag. (BOURG LEOPOLD operations were the best total). In addition numerous M.Gs, Faustpatroners, Panzerschreck and an Anti-Tank gun were captured.
    General RENNIE G.O.C. 51 DIVISION visited Battalion H.Q. next day and thanked the Commanding Officer for the very successful part of the day’s Operations that the Battalion had accomplished.
    As a prelude to the end of the German Army this side of the RHINE we can be most satisfied with the part we have played, and as the battle leaves us behind on either flank and advances towards GOCH the past few days will stand us as a very good precedent for whatever our next task in this phase of ending the war may be.

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    KILLED IN ACTION
    2659728 Sergeant W. MOORE (H.Q. Company)
    2661325 Guardsman F. HODGE (H.Q. Company)
    2666249 Guardsman R. HOWELL (H.Q. Company)
    2661276 Guardsman C. BREWER (H.Q. Company)
    2665920 Lance-Corporal A. BARRETT (1 Company)
    2666652 Guardsman J. WASS (1 Company)
    2666676 Guardsman R. CAPRON (1 Company)
    2660142 Lance-Corporal G. SMITH (H.Q. Company)
    2662474 Guardsman J. JENNINGS (H.Q. Company)
    2662018 Guardsman H. STEBBINGS (H.Q. Company)
    2658857 Lance-Corporal J. WEDDERBURN (3 Company)
    2659235 Guardsman H. COOPER (1 Company)
    2666839 Guardsman J. WEEKS (1 Company)
    WOUNDED
    2661667 Lance-Corporal S. LEES (1 Company)
    14442736 Guardsman A. NORMAN (1 Company)
    2664220 Guardsman B. WILSON (1 Company)
    2666845 Guardsman D. KEELING (3 Company)
    2662982 Guardsman S. BOUND (H.Q. Company)
    5497347 Guardsman W. LORD (H.Q. Company)
    2662691 Lance-Corporal S. RAYNER (Support Company)
    2658262 Guardsman E. ALDERTON (1 Company)
    14402668 Guardsman R. GREIG (1 Company)
    2665923 Guardsman E. STRETTON (2 Company)
    2658193 Guardsman E. KIDD (2 Company)
    2666915 Guardsman J. DONALDSON (3 Company)
    2660300 Guardsman S. STOKES (H.Q. Company)
    2659924 Guardsman R. KIBBLE (1 Company)
    2663724 Lance-Sergeant F. HEALEY (1 Company)
    2660642 Guardsman G. TOWNEND (1 Company)
    2657627 Guardsman W. PARKER (H.Q. Company)
    2666850 Guardsman A. RHODES (H.Q. Company)
    2662651 Guardsman A. CROOKS (1 Company)
    2666746 Guardsman R. FORSTER (1 Company)
    4607199 Lance-Corporal A. CHATTERTON (Support Company)
    869658 Guardsman S. SYKES (2 Company)
    2660789 Guardsman L. THOMPSON (3 Company)
    2654354 Guardsman H. RAVEN (H.Q. Company)
    WOUNDED RETRAIN WITH UNIT
    2663103 Guardsman J. METCALF (H.Q. Company)
    2664258 Guardsman G. MALYON (3 Company
    ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL
    2666876 Guardsman A. RENNEY (3 Company)

    U.K. LEAVE.
    A fourth day of cancellation has occurred. ‘D’ Day for Left Flank 50 will now be 23 February.


    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 14
    Monday, 19th February, 1945

    THE BATTALION SECTOR.
    During the day there was no contact with the enemy, seeming to confirm the statement made by three sniper Prisoners of war picked u by No. 1 Company who said that their Company had withdrawn during the night leaving only about 10 men behind with orders to keep a watch and carry out sniping and general harassing activities. Their company withdrew to the area of SIEBENGEWALD.
    Activities reminiscent of our encounters with 7 Para Division at VENRAY disturbed the early hours of this morning, and a fighting patrol was in action opposite No. 4 and No. 3 Companies blazing away lustily for nearly an hour.
    Lieutenant G.D. WAUHOPE was wounded but we had no other casualties and several wrappers off German field dressings were found left behind, so it is fairly certain that we wounded several of them.
    For those who haven’t seen our road back to F.2 the mud is growing rapidly worse and now equals anything else to be found on battle fields the world over. Three weasels have been lent to the Battalion to assist in overcoming the resultant complications.

    THE BIG PICTURE.
    The latest news has not yet come in, but GOCH is now being attacked and no doubt it will be possible to report a successful outcome in our next edition.
    The total of enemy Prisoners of War for this operation is now 8,000.

    ENEMY EQUIPMENT.
    THE GERMAN MECHANICAL MIND AT WORK.
    SHAEF Technical Intelligence Bulletin reports a remarkable new enemy weapon - a machine mortar, the like of which has not been since Rube Goldberg. The instrument is approximately nine foot high and is equipped with a profusion of accessories, including power hoist for the ammunition. With this impressive gadgetry the mortar labours and brings forth a 50mm shell. The rate of fire, as indicated on a plate riveted to the mortar, can be adjusted up to 120 r.p.m. The gunner sits in a metal chair while operating the machine, a second chair (purpose is not listed in the document) is probably for the ammunition bearer to rest in after he brings up enough rounds to operate the mortar for 11 seconds. The excerpts below are taken from a captured German handbook:-
    “Power drive comes from an electric motor in the power room and is transmitted through a horizontal shaft at floor level from the meter.”
    “The barrel moves up and down in a fixed slide by a simple crank arm operated by a cam in the drive. The firing pin withdrawal also operates from the drive.”
    "the bombs are loaded in clips, holding six bombs and those clips are fed by hand into a rack on the left side.”
    “A handwheel operates the traverse…”
    "A foot pedal releases a brake…”
    "A periscope can be raised…”
    “An electrical control box…”
    "A power-operated ammunition hoist…”
    "A heavy flywheel…”
    "A jack system in the bottom compartment…”
    "A ventilating and air purifying plant with gas filters…”
    No mention is made of the fact that an average American crew can put out about 18 r.p.m., operating the mortar by hand.

    B.B.C. NEWS.
    MARINES INVADE IWO JIMA.
    Admiral NIMITZ announces that American Marines have invaded IWO JIMA the Japanese island stronghold 75 miles from TOKIO.
    In their two day attack on TOKIO and YOKOHAMA American carrier planes destroyed 509 Japanese planes. The Americans lost 49 aircraft.
    A Japanese escort carrier was set on fire and 12 other vessels including two destroyers were sunk. No American ships were damaged.
    American troops on CORREGIDOR island have taken an important hill position.
    American warships are shelling the CAVITE shore line in MANILA BAY and torpedo boats have entered MANILA Harbour.

    NEW BRIDGEHEAD ACROSS IRRAWADDY.
    In BURMA British 14th Army troops now have a new bridgehead across the IRRAWADDY 30 miles down stream from MANDALAY. They hold 9 square miles on the Japanese side of the river.
    United Kingdom and Indian troops have made a new landing on the ARACAN Coast just opposite to the northern tip of RAMREE island.
    United Kingdom troops are across the coast road 1 1/2 miles inland.
    Super Fortresses from INDIA today bombed Japanese communications in MALAYA.

    CLOSING IN ON GOCH AND CALCAR.
    In the West, British troops are closing on the SIEGFRIED strongpoint of GOCH.
    Scottish and Canadian infantry are at the approaches to CALCAR.
    American 3rd Army troops in the bridgeheads across the rivers SURE and OUR have advanced up to 1 1/2 miles and taken 5 towns.
    American 7th Army men are again fighting inside GERMANY. They have centred woods north of AUERSMACHER.
    Field Marshal MONTGOMERY in a message to his troops says the 21st Army Group is ready for the last round against the Germans.

    RUSSIANS ADVANCING FURTHER.
    The Russians have taken two more big towns in SILESIA.
    Other Soviet troops have encircled GRUDZIADZ 60 miles south of DANZIG. In EAST PRUSSIA the Russians have take more places south of KONIGSBERG.

    PRIVILEGE LABES.
    Six Privilege Labels (A.F. W5192) are now allowed instead of four a year. You have had three and there are now there more to come instead of one.

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    WOUNDED
    2666707 Guardsman B. WHITE (3 Company)
    2666896 Guardsman E. ATTER (3 Company)
    ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL
    14720660 Guardsman W. VOWLES (1 Company)
    3709806 Guardsman R NICHOLSON (3 Company)
    2666888 Guardsman G LETHWAITE (1 Company)
    2653628 Guardsman J. HARKER (3 Company), Battle Accident

    ERRATUM.
    In the account of our last attack - published in yesterday’s issue - for “Right” road “Left” throughout. Written during the small hours of the morning somehow or other “error crept in”.

    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 15
    Tuesday, 20th February, 1945

    THE BATTALION SECTOR.
    A deserter gathered in by No. 3 Company was able to give us some useful information on the patrol which gave us so much trouble the other night. He was a member of the patrol which he said was 25 strong and commanded by a Sergeant. They all came from II Bn 1221 G.R. who were the former occupants of this position and the patrol’s orders were to go back and collect some of the ammunition and arms that they left behind in their precipitous flight the day before.
    Confirming our suspicions he told us that he himself saw one member of the patrol wounded and that only 21 of them got back at the end, so presumably there others were also wounded and unable to managed the journey home.
    His Battalion which is dug in and living in the village of SIEBENGEWALD is now only about 500 strong. Battalion H.Q., a Company H.Q. and various other items were pinpointed so that by the end of things their strength is likely to be even further diminished.
    The deserter besides being an intelligent and talkative sort of Hun was also the Commanding Officer’s servant and one can only presume that he must have been very ill treated to have heaped all this further crop of disasters upon his unhappy commander.

    THE BIG PICTURE.
    GOCH is now firmly in our hands. From other quarters there is nothing to report.

    WELSH GUARDS’ PRAISE.
    The following is an extract from a letter to the Commanding Officer from the Commanding Officer of the 2nd Recce Battalion WELSH GUARDS, Lieutenant-Colonel J.C. LEWIS, DSO, MC.:-
    “What a splendid lot of men you have; our fellows are still telling about their determination and fortitude in the successful though rather unpleasant afternoon of Friday. It was a great honour for my squadron to work with your Battalion and I only wish that conditions under foot had enabled them to render fuller support.”

    B.B.C. NEWS.
    HEAVIEST YET ON TOKIO.
    American Super Fortresses from the MARIANNAS yesterday made their heaviest attack yet on TOKIO.
    They hit a big aircraft factory and shot down at least 20 enemy fighters. Three super Fortresses were lost.
    American Army Liberators have bombed FORMOSA.

    AMERICAN MARINES PUSH INLAND.
    The American Marines on the Japanese outpost of IWO JIMA were last reported some 600 yards inland and near the air strip on the volcanic platoon of the island.
    Despite the preliminary bombardment the Americans had a tough job against the Japanese manning guns in tunnels and caves.

    SCOTTISH TROOPS HOLD GOCH.
    On the Western Front Scottish troops of the Canadian 1st Army now held west of the SIEGFRIED town of GOCH.
    Canadian troops gained another section of the GOCH - CALCAR road and are within two miles of CALCAR.
    American 3rd Army troops have advanced up to one mile at points along a 55 mile front.
    General PATTON’s men have broken through the SIEGFRIED defences on a 7 mile front and in some places are over four miles into GERMANY.

    RUSSIANS TIGHTEN THEIR GRIP.
    Russian forces in EAST PRUSSIA have tightened their ring around the Germans hemmed in against the BALTIC shore.
    At sea, planes and ships of the Soviet Baltic Fleet sank five German supply ships.
    In the old Polish Corridor Soviet troops have taken a town 50 miles south of DANZIG.
    The Red Army advance in POLAND has freed a number of American prisoners of war.

    14TH ARMY ENLARG BRIDGEHEAD.
    In BURMA the British 14th Army now IRRAWADDY bridgehead west of MANDALAY is being steadily enlarged despite bitter resistance.
    Above MANDALAY the 19th Indian Division has enlarged the SINGU bridgehead and is driving south and east.

    IN BRIEF.
    R.A.F. Mosquitoes last night attacked ERFURT in CENTRAL GERMANY.
    American Flying Fortresses yesterday attacked rail centres and industrial targets in WESTERN GERMANY.

    Mr CHURCHILL and Mr. EDEN are back in LONDON.

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    WOUNDED
    2666859 Guardsman G. COLES (1 Company)
    2666729 Guardsman R. STINCHCOMBE (1 Company)
    ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL
    2664121 Guardsman E. JOHNSTON (Support Company)
    2654944 Guardsman A. RALPH (1 Company)

    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 16
    Wednesday, 21st February, 1945

    B.B.C. NEWS.
    THE WESTERN FRONT.
    On the WESTERN FRONT American 7th Army troops have cleared more frontier towns three miles from SAARBRUCKEN.
    They have reached high ground east of FORBACH overlooking the industrial area that runs north east towards SAARBRUCKEN.
    American 3rd Army troops squeezing the German bulge between PRUM and ? have gained up to 2 1/2 miles on a 60 mile front.
    On the Canadian 1st Army front Scottish and Welsh troops have almost completely cleared GOCH.

    DORTMUND RAIDED LAST NIGHT.
    Royal Air Force Bomber Command last night sent more than 1,200 planes over GERMAN with DORTMUND as the main target.
    Mosquito bombers made two attacks on BERLIN with 4,000 punders. In daylight yesterday American heavies attacked NUREMBERT.

    RUSSIANS TAKE CROSSEN.
    On the EASTERN FRONT Marshal KONIEV’s forces are within 70 miles of BERLIN to the south east.
    They now hold the town of CROSSEN on the ODER where they are linked with Marshal ZHUKOV’s men.
    Red Army men are now just over 40 miles south of DANZIG.

    MR. CHURCHILL AND THE EASTERN WAR.
    Mr. CHURCHILL during his visit to EGYPT met President ROOSEVELT and emphasised Britain’s determination to throw in everything she has at the Japanese as soon as GERMANY is defeated.
    Mr. CHURCHILL with Mr. EDEN also saw the Emperor of ETHIOPIA, King FAROUK of EGYPT, IBN SAUD of SAUDI ARABIA and the SYRIAN President.

    IN BRIEF.
    American troops on IWO JIMA now control more than a third of the island. On LUZON the Japanese in MANILA have been driven into an area of little more than half a mile square.

    In BURMA the Japanese have been pro???d further back from the bridgeheads established by British and Indian troops across the IRRAWADDY north and west of MANDALAY.

    In ITALY 5th Army men have made gains on a minor ridge 18 miles north of PESTOLA.

    Earl LLOYD GEORGE who is 82 is suffering from increasing physical weakness and his condition is causing some anxiety.

    GERMAN CURRENCY.
    German issued notes in denominations of 100 marks and above will not be accepted by the Allied Authorities. Disciplinary action will be taken against anybody found in possession of these.


    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 17
    Thursday, 22nd February, 1945

    B.B.C. NEWS.
    BOMBER COMMAND OUT IN STRENGTH.
    Royal Air Force Bomber Command hand over 1,000 planes out again last night. Their main target was the rail centre of WORMS in WESTERN GERMANY.
    A strong force also attacked DUISBERG. BERLIN was twice bombed during the night.
    Over 1,200 American heavies attacked NUREMBERG during the day.

    3RD ARMY OCCUPY 17 MORE PLACES.
    Canadian 1st Army troops have gained ground on both sides of GOCH where mopping up went on yesterday.
    Canadian Infantry have cleared the woods south west of MOYLAND.
    American 3rd Army troops have occupied 17 more German towns and villages. They now hold an 8 mile stretch of the SAAR below [?]SAARBRUCKEN and have entered the town itself.
    American 7th Army were last reported fighting in the streets of FORBACH.

    KONIEV’S MEN GAIN GROUND.
    Marshal KONIEV’s troops have gained more ground south east of BERLIN and were last night closing on the last river valley before COTTBUS 55 miles from the Capital.
    Other Soviet forces have taken a town 45 miles from DANZIG, but in EAST PRUSSIA the Russians have had to give up several places.

    THE ITALIAN FRONT.
    In ITALY American troops have taken two important heights west of the mountain road between PISTOLA and BOLOGNA.
    Thunderbolts from Italian bases on Tuesday attacked the railcards at BERCHTESGADEN.

    IN BRIEF.
    The American Marines on IWO JIMA have been checked for the time being by stubborn Japanese resistance. Troops of the 3rd Marine Division have landed to reinforce the 4th and 5th Divisions.

    American guns have breached the walls of INTRAMUROS the old quarter of MANILA where Japanese remnants still hold out. The Japanese Garrison on CORREGIDOR has been practically destroyed.

    American submarines in Far Eastern waters have sunk 25 more Japanese ships including an escort carrier, a large converted cruiser and a destroyer.

    Mr. Stephen EARLY President ROOSEVELT’s Secretary arrived in PARIS last evening.


    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 18
    Sunday, 25th February, 1945

    THE BATTALION SECTOR
    The enemy at present opposite us are the remnants of 84 Infantry Division. This is the Division that took the whole weight of the attack against the REICHSWALD on the D Day of Operation VERITABLE and as a result its total value is now not more than three battalions.
    If 15 Pz Division had managed to extricate itself from the North of GOCH in better shape, it is probable that no more would heave been heard of 84 Division, but 15 Pz Division narrowly escaped encirclement and was then bombed and shelled for 24 hours as it made its way out through GOCH, with the result that it had to be taken out of battle and something had to be found to fill the gap.
    Since the arrival of 84 Division this sector has been bolstered up by 7 Para Division on one flank and the latest arrival of all, Pz Lehr Division, both of whom are good Divisions though in serious need of reinforcements.
    There is also in this area 635 Hy A-Tk ? which no doubt accounts for the SP guns that have been bothering us.
    Behind the hills in front of us lies UDEM, which is a very important link in the German defence and it is unlikely that they will give it up without putting up a strong defence. At one time there was a garrison of troops from 7 Para Division in the town but these have now moved. It seems likely that in the next day or so something fresh will turn up to strengthen things here, as remnants of 84 Division are not a very reliable force to guard the approaches to such an important place.

    THE BIG PICTURE.
    Yesterday there were nothing but local moves on the British sector, and the most important news is of the progress of the American 9th Army that has crossed the ROER River in great strength and shows promise of big things. Their bridgehead extends for about ten miles on either side of the town of JULICH which is now clear of the enemy. DUREN is likely to fall soon, but the best progress has been made in the northern half of the bridgehead where they are pushing towards MUNCHEN GLADBACH. Latest reports place the Americans as about eight miles short of the town.
    There is no exact news of what towns the Americans have captured so far, but the operation is clearly going very well and it is hoped that more details will be available for tomorrow’s issue.

    PERSONAL MESSAGE FROM CORPS COMMANDER.
    The following message from the CORPS Commander has been received:-
    “Personal from Commander 30 CORPS to all troops. You have taken approximately 12,000 Prisoners of War and killed large numbers of Germans. You have broken through the Siegfried Line and drawn on to yourselves the bulk of the German reserves in the WEST. A strong U.S. offensive was launched over the ROER at 0330 hours this morning against positions which thanks to your efforts are lightly hold by the Germans. Thank you for what you have done so well.”

    NEWS IN BRIEF.
    TOKIO has been bombed again by carrier based planes.
    The last Japanese positions in SOUTHERN MANILA have been taken.

    B.B.C. NEWS.
    PROGRESS ON THE WESTERN FRONT.
    More American 1st and 9th Army troops and supplies are across the ROER River. In the latest fighting there has been a general advance of about a mile against stronger resistance but some spearheads are 4 1/2 miles east of the river.
    JULICH has been taken and there is fighting in DUREN.
    General EISENHOWER reporting satisfactory progress said the offensive could mark the beginning of the destruction of the German forces west of the RHINE.
    Field Marshal MONTGOMERY is in operational command of the American 9th Army.
    Between the MAAS and the RHINE United Kingdom troops have advanced down the road from GOCH towards WEEZE.
    In the South, American 3rd Army troops have made more progress.

    ANOTHER GOOD DAY FOR AIR FORCES.
    About 1700 flights were made over the battle area yesterday.
    Mosquitoes bombed BERLIN last night.
    Yesterday over 1100 American heavies attacked oil refineries, U Boat yards at HAMBURG and BREMEN and railways in North West Germany.
    R.A.F. bombers also attacked an oil plant near DORTMUND.

    EGYPTIAN PREMIER SHOT.
    The Egyptian Prime Minister was shot dead just after announcing EGYPT’s decision to declare war on GERMANY and JAPAN. A man has been arrested.

    IN BRIEF.
    Russian troops have made progress in BRESLAU and its suburbs. More gains have been made near KONIGSBERG.

    British and Indian troops have further enlarged their bridgehead near MANDALAY. Super Fortresses bombed RANGOON and SINGAPORE.

    There had been riots in BUCHAREST and other HUNGARIAN towns by Anti-Government demonstrators.

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    WOUNDED
    Lieutenant M.O. MACONACHIE
    1449851 Lance-Corporal W. DIBBLE (3 Company)
    14686675 Guardsman F. BARRITT (3 Company)
    2659025 Guardsman ? BEWLEY (4 Company)
    MISSING
    Lieutenant T.R. SYMONS
    2662705 Guardsman W. ANDREWS (2 Company)
    ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL
    2657817 Lance-Corporal D. ADAMS (3 Company)
    2659118 Guardsman R. BARNES (2 Company)
    2665889 Guardsman ? FO?STER (3 Company)


    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 19
    Tuesday, 27th February, 1945

    BATTLE NEWS.
    From the whole length of the Western Front yesterday brought good news of substantial advances, rising Prisoner of War totals, and an increasingly optimistic general picture.
    On our own CORPS front al the days objectives have been taken. UDEM is in our hands, on the right we are astride the railway line, and on the left the Canadians are established on the high ground S.E. of the town. This advance is still going on.
    One surprise during the night was the arrival of some Prisoners of War from 116 Pz Division. 116 Pz Division was supposed to be reforming in the HOCHWALD preparatory to making a stand in that area. If the Prisoner of War taken last night indicate that 116 Pz has been committed already then the Germans must be very hard pressed and progress in the future is likely to speed up considerably.
    The Americans continue to push forward at a very good pace all along the ROER front. They have reached ERKELENZ and strong armoured forces several miles east of the town are fanning out on the good tank country that runs up to GRAUENBROICH and the road to NEUSS and DUESSELDORF. On the road to COLOGNE they have pushed some eight miles east from JULICH and reached ISDORF.
    The going in front of DUREN has been slower, but the Americans are pushing on down the DUREN - COLOGNE road despite the heavier opposition and now have only about 15 miles to go.
    In general the situation is coming to take on a very ‘NORMANDY’ complexion - the initial British thrust drawing off the German reserves and making slow progress against stiff opposition, then a big American offensive fast gaining speed, the German lack of Amoured reserves - and let us hope all the rest of the features that made up such a successful recipe for victory last time.

    B.B.C. NEWS.
    THE WESTERN FRONT.
    On the WESTERN FRONT United Kingdom and Canadian troops have advanced 3 1/2 miles and entered the outskirts of CALCAR. 1,000 Prisoners were taken.
    To the South the 1st and 9th American Armies have fanned out on a combined front of 35 miles.
    The 1st Army has advanced 5 miles from DUREN and is 12 miles from the outskirts of COLOGNE.
    The 9th Army has advanced to within 8 miles of RHEYDT.
    The 3rd Army has closed up to a 35 mile stretch of the FRUM River. the Germans are still counter-attacking east of SAAREBOURG.

    DAYLIGHT RAID ON BERLIN BY 1200 HEAVIES.
    Royal Air Force Mosquitoes attacked BERLIN during the night following the daylight raid on BERLIN by more than 1,200 American heavy bombers. This was the heaviest blow the Americans have struck at the German capital.
    3,000 tons of high explosives and incendiaries were dropped on three main rail stations.
    Over 700 fighters escorted the bombers. 16 bombers and 7 fighters are missing.
    R.A.F. heavy bombers yesterday attacked a synthetic oil plant and DORTMUND and Spitfires attacked rocket targets.
    -
    An agreement has been signed between the CZECHOSLOVAK Government and UNRA for relief in CZECHOSLOVAKIA.
    -

    SLANG IN THE GERMAN ARMED FORCES.
    The German tendency to exalt Food to the level of a minor deity is well known. It is odd therefore to find that military slang words for various articles of diet are fairly repulsive. One encounters the most unappetising terms - “Froschlaich” (Frog’s spawn) for Barley Broth; “Schlabbercagos” (Slobber-cabbage) for Boiled Cabbage; and “Schlangenfrass” (Snake-food for animals) for Macaroni. The classic item appears to be - “Yoyo mit Jadeschlaem” (Yoyo with liver and slime) which, in the German mind, conjures up a vision of Meat Roll and Mashed Potatoes. As is to be expected, the enemy’s fund of terms signifying Disapproval is large. To mention only two “Beretzt” (besotted) is approximately equivalent to sizzled or stewed: and “Gruetzkopf” (Gruel-head) indicates fatheadness of a high orer. A number of stronger terms are also employed.
    German soldiers refer to their female colleagues as “Blitzmodels”. The ladies are also known as mattresses of various kinds - “Offiziersmatratze” “Feldmatratze”, and plain “Matratze”.
    On the religious side, the ar??t of the Army and the Navy is complex: “E.S.A.K.” (Evangelische Sonderabwehrkanone” - Protestant Anti-Special Emergencies Cannon - i.e. clergymen); and “Himmelslotso” (Sky Pilot) head the list. The expression “Bordeislicher” (Shipboard Clergyman) is rather deceptive, since it actually indicates the presence on board ship of a Gestapo Agent.
    The German calls the British soldiers “Tommies” and the sailors “Bobbies”.
    He calls his stomach a hamburger cemetery (“Prikandellenfriedhof”).[Frikadellen!]
    Jerry refers to a suicide mission as a “Himmelsfahrkommando”, and “U-bootwiese” (U-Boat Meadows) is the Valhalla of those submariners who hit the jackpot.
    The GAF has developed a jargon of its own - “Katschmarck” is Tail-end Charlie: “Klavier aus dem fuenften Stock” (Piano out of the fifth floor) means crashed-landing; “Kraehe” (Crow) signifies aircraft; and the “Luftkutcher” (Air Coachman) is the pilot.
    What the GI calls a G.F.U. and the R.A.F. entitles a “Clueless Clot” is known in German circles as a Crutch (“Krueke”).

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    KILLED IN ACTION
    2665507 Guardsman G. HARRISON (Support Company)
    WOUNDED
    2666475 Guardsman E. JOY (2 Company)
    2666229 Guardsman G. LUMLEY (Support Company)
    2659335 Sergeant G. HARDY (Support Company)
    2662062 Guardsman P. MASON (3 Company)
    ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL
    2661822 Lance-Sergeant R. CARR (H.Q. Company), Battle accident
    2662156 Lance-Corporal J. CONKLETON (H.Q. Company)

    HEAVY FIGHTING AROUND KONIGSBERG.
    On the EASTERN FRONT heavy fighting is going on on both sides of KONIGSBERG. In the Peninsular to the North West the Russians yesterday beat off more German attacks.
    South West the Red Army captured several more places.

    NEW BRIDGEHEAD IN BURMA.
    In BURMA British troops have won a new bridgehead across the IRRAWADDY at PAGAN 92 miles south west of MANDALAY.
    American troops have landed on VERDE Island between LUZON and MINDORA. General MACARTHUR has turned over the Civll Government of the PHILIPPINES to President OSMENA.

    IN BRIEF.
    General ANDERS has been appointed acting Commander-in-Chief of the forces under control of the Polish Government in LONDON. This was done without the knowledge or approval of the British Government.


    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 20
    Wednesday, 28th February, 1945

    B.B.C.
    SECURITY BLACKOUT ON WESTERN FRONT
    The Canadian 1st Army has broken the last German defence line covering the RHINE crossing. It has advanced 7 miles.
    American 9th Army tanks and infantry were last reported about one mile from MUNCHEN GLADBACH but there is now a security blackout on their movements.
    American 1st Army troops have taken a village within 9 miles of COLOGNE.
    On Monday 7,000 more prisoners were taken bringing the total to over 40,000 since the present operation began.

    MR CHURCHILL OPENS THREE DAY DEBATE
    UNITY BETWEEN BIG THREE
    Mr. CHURCHILL yesterday opened a three day debate in the Commons on the Crimea Conference.
    He made these points:-
    Unity between the big three is closer then ever.
    The British Government has always thought the freedom of POLAND more important that the actual frontier.
    It fully supports the Russian claim for the CURZON Line.
    The Allies will disarm GERMAN, destroy Nazism and militarism, punish war criminals, eliminate or control all GERMAN industry and make GERMANY pay for war damage.
    British policy is a strong FRANCE and a strong French Army.
    The chief burden of maintaining peace must fall on the great powers but it is their duty to serve the world not to abuse it.

    BERLIN AGAIN HIT.
    R.A.F. Mosquitoes last night attacked BERLIN again.
    Yesterday’s targets for hundreds of British and American bombers included MAINZ and LEIPZIG.
    Heavy bombers from ITALY attacked rail yards at AUGSBURG.

    NEW RUSSIAN THRUST.
    Russian troops have advanced 45 miles in a new thrust to the Baltic between DANZIG and STETTIN and have captured more than 100 places.

    PROGRESS IN THE PACIFIC.
    In the PACIFIC American troops have made more limited gains on IWO JIMA.
    In the PHILIPPINES American troops have wiped out the Japanese Garrison on VERDE Island.
    In NORTHERN BURMA Chinese forces are within 24 miles of LASHIO.

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL
    2661918 Lance-Corporal H. BOULD (4 Company)
    2664849 Guardsman W. HANKEY (4 Company)
    2655707 Guardsman E. IAGAR (1 Company)
    2662906 Guardsman R. DAWSON (4 Company)
     
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    1 March 1945
    1800 Hours Sitrep. Line runs excl GROOTE HORST 8639, excl WEEZER 9337, incl KERVENHEIM 9337, excl BALBERGEN WALD, 0438, 4 CANADIAN DIVISION on edge of the HOCHWALD.
    The Battalion is to come under command of 32 BRIGADE tomorrow, when they rejoin the rest of the Division is the present area around GOCH.

    2 March
    1100 Hours Sitrep. American 9th Army entered VENLO without opposition. NEUSS has been captured and the RHINE reached just north of DUSSELDORF.
    1400 Hours O’ Group 5 BRIGADE H.Q.
    Information: 3RD DIVISION have cleared WEEZE and KERVENHEIM and are now approaching KEVELIER 9533 and WINNEKENDORK 9934. Enemy opposition is still very determined.
    Future events: GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION is to pass through 53 and 3 DIVISION when they have captured KEVELIER and WINNEKENDONK and advance with 5 BRIGADE in the lead on the axis KAPELLEN 0431, ISSUM 0927, BONNINGHARDT 1231, to seize the high ground in that area.
    The Division is at three hours notice to move and it is expected that 5 BRIGADE will move off today so as to be ready to advance from KAPELLAN at first light tomorrow. 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS will be under command of 32 BRIGADE and will be picked up by them when the Brigade passes through GOCH.

    3 March
    1630 Hours Sitrep. The Division is now due to move at 1900 hours. DEVELIER and WINNEKENDONK have both been captured but blown bridges, craters in the roads and mines, hav been causing delay and there will not be a road open to the Division till then.
    KREFELD, KEMPEN and SONDERSHEIM have been cleared by the Americans. The Canadians have cleared most of the HOCHWALD. 11 ARMOURED DIVISION is held up outside SONSBECK.
    1900 Hours Sitrep. Head of the Division now to move at 0130 hours. 53 DIVISION is at present completing the clearance of GELDERN and at first light they are to push on to ISSUM. A junction has been made with the Americans at BERENDONK 9928 and the Americans are reported to be in SEVEREN. 3 DIVISION are in WETTIN 9931. 5 BRIGADE are to pass through them at first light and make for the high ground around BONNINGHARDT.

    4 March
    1200 Hours Sitrep. 5 BRIGADE reported to be held up S.W. of KAPELLEN by craters at 037305 and a blown bridge at 636311. 32 BRIGADE remain at two hours notice.
    2300 Hours Orders received from Brigade - the Battalion is due to cross the Division S.P. in GOCH at 0130 hours.
    The COLDSTREAM Group will be leading the Brigade. It is not possible to marry the two together, so the 1st Battalion will travel separated and in front of the 5th Battalion.

    5 March
    0115 Hours The Battalion passed the Division S.P. in GOCH and passing through WEEZE, KEVELIER and WETTIN arrived at 017337 a few miles outside WETTIN at 0700 hours where the column halted for breakfast.
    0900 Hours The Commanding Officer went to Brigade H.Q. The IRISH GUARDS have captured HAMB 0631 and are at present held up by strong enemy opposition in the woods to the North. It is unlikely that the Battalion will be in action before 1300 hours.
    1400 Hours The Commanding Officer went to Tac Division H.Q. in KAPELLAN. It was originally planned that the 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS should captured METXEKATH 0932 and then the Battalion would attack through them to BONNINGHARDT, but it became necessary to use the 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS before this and it was finally arranged for the 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS to clear the woods in the area 065335, 085325, 070320 so as to start the Battalion off from the wood at 085325 on to METXEKATH under command of 5 BRIGADE. The 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS operation starting at 1500 hours to be completed in time to start the Battalion’s attack on METXEKATH at 1700 hours if possible.
    1500 Hours The Battalion was ordered to move in T.C.Ls up to KAPPELEN then debs and march to an assembly area at 070325. F.2 to be left behind.
    The Battalion ‘O’ Group was also sent for and the Commanding Officer gave out the following orders:-
    Information: The BONNINGHARDT woods are being strongly held by units of 8 Para Divisino, who have been putting up a very stubborn opposition. They are being aided by several S.P. guns. On the flanks, SONSBECK is still held by the enemy and at 1028 53 DIVISION have been pushed back to ISSUM by a counter attack.
    Intention: 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS will attack and capture METXEKATH 0932.
    Method: The Battalion will form up behind the east edge of the WOOD at 084324. S.L. the forward edge of the WOOD. Inter Company boundary and axis of advance the track from 084324 up to METXEKATH.
    The Battalion will attack with two Companies up:-
    right 4 Company objective the buildings in the area 096324.
    Left 3 Company objective the WOOD 097326 up to the ridge at 097328.
    1 Company will follow up behind 3 Company, objective BUIDINGS at 095327.
    2 Company will follow up behind 4 Company, objective BUILDINGS at 095325.
    Fire Plan: 5 Field Batteries and 3 Medium Batteries will be firing a series of five progressive stinks from H to H plus 29.
    A Section of Mortars will move with each forward Company.
    Admin: Except for F1 vehicles everything else will for the moment remain at F2. Greatcoats, a blanket, and the evening meal will come up on the Carriers after consolidation.
    Intercommunications: Battalion H.Q. will move down the track and will then establish itself at 095327.
    H Hour dependant upon the result of the 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS attack will be at 1700 hours.
    1600 Hours H Hour was altered to 1730.
    1730 Hours In error some of the supporting Artillery fire came down on the S.L. The Battalion then advanced and by 1930 hours just before last light all objectives had been captured and the position consolidated.
    Some enemy were encountered as the Companies passed through the woods but the stiffest opposition was met with in the farms and buildings around METXEKATH where the enemy para troops fought on very tenaciously right up to the end. Two S.P. guns were seen but they drew off just as 4 Company reached their objective. A 7.5 Pak Anti-Tank gun just in front of 4 Company’s objective continued to fire at point blank range down the track and was a cause of great trouble till finally eliminated. It was defended by a number of men using bazookas in an anti infantry role. An 88mm and a French Anti-Tank gun were also captured. The total of Prisoners of War taken came to 105 Other Ranks and 4 Officers. Most of them came from 22 Para Regiment of 8 Para Division. There were also a number of mountain troops from 1062 J.R. Several were collected during the night. Their fighting qualities were very markedly inferior to the Para troops.
    The centre line track had been mined. After two had been set off it became necessary to hold up the vehicles of Battalion H.Q. while the route was cleared and slowed up the arrival of vehicles till darkness.
    2300 Hours Information from 5 BRIGADE: At 1100 hours tomorrow 32 BRIGADE will attack from the position of 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS and capture BONNINGHARDT. Two patrols are to be sent out to see whether the WOOD at 102326 and the edge of the WOOD at 103323 are held by the enemy.
    During the night a large number of enemy were seen by No. 1 Company at 097327. They withdrew after being shot at. An enemy patrol was also shot up. There was very little enemy shelling. It appeared that the enemy were uncertain of our exact position, and in the process of pulling back in a very disorganised state.

    6 March
    A Platoon was sent out to the edge of the WOOD at 098337 to protect the 32 BRIGADE S.L. which was the track running south from here to 095315.
    The 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS formed up to the north of METZEKATH, the 1st Battalion WELSH GUARDS to the south of it, and at 1100 hours the attack went in.
    The objectives were all captured by 1230 hours, the 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS consolidating in the area of the WOOD 1131 and the WELSH GUARDS in the front edge of the WOOD. There was very little opposition and a large number of Prisoners of War were captured.
    1200 Hours The Battalion returned under command of 32 BRIGADE.
    As soon as the WELSH GUARDS had moved out the Battalion moved up to their previous position:-
    No. 1 Company 113320
    No. 2 Company 110315
    No. 3 Company 120323
    No. 4 Company 118318.
    Battalion H.Q. moved to the Hunting Lodge STAUDENHOF 103322.
    On occupying the billets in their areas the Companies rounded up 26 lurking Prisoners of War including two Officers found hiding in a loft.

    7 March
    At 1915 hours the WELSH GUARDS completed Phase II by capturing the village of BONNINGHARDT 1231. Opposition was much stiffer.
    During the morning No 2 and No 4 Companies cleared the WOODS to the south of the Battalion. They went right through to the southern edge and found no sign of any enemy. A small minefield was lifted.
    The 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS and 1st Battalion WELSH GUARDS sent out patrols during the day.
    The 53 DIVISION were contacted at ROAD JUNCTION 145310.
    All the ground up to the escarpment was found to be clear of enemy, but there to the west of it and ALPON is held.
    In the evening the 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS relieved the 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS, who moved up to the area of the CROSS TRACKS 140318 and the escarpment.
    During the day there was a certain amount of enemy shelling, mostly on to the ground North of the road through BONNINGHARDT.
    Parts of this area are under observation from some factory chimneys in MENZELEN 1636.
    2000 Hours O’ Group at Brigade H.Q.
    Information: The present situation is as follows:-
    Americans in OSSENBERG 1930, and MILLIGEN 1830: 53 DIVISION in the WOODS South of ALPON from the ROAD JUNCTION 145310 to 163303: GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION from excl. the ROAD JUNCTION to 12133: the Canadians have been attacking VEEN 1135 all day but the result is not yet known: North of VEEN the enemy still hold the high ground 1038: XANTEN has been completely cleared.
    The Germans have received a Hitler Order that their bridgehead his to be held to the last man.
    Tomorrow morning the Americans have been directed on to the CROSS ROADS 1833.
    If this attack is successful GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION will not be taking any further part in operations.
    If it is not successful an attack will be made with 52 DIVISION (who are relieving 53 DIVISION tonight) going for the line of the MUHLOHL 1533, HAUS LOO 160334, DRUPT 1732, and 32 BRIGADE going for the line of the road from the railway crossing 157347 to 165340.
    It will be fixed as to whether or not the attack comes off at 1300 hours and the actual attack will take place between 1600 and 1700 hours.
    All arrangements must be made on the assumption that it will take place.
    Intention: 32 BRIGADE will secure the line of the ROAD from 157347 to 165340.
    Method: Phase One to be carried out by the 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS will consist of seizing the two crossings over the ROMER and then capturing KUHNEN, WEGENSHOF and up to the line of the railway.
    Phase Two: 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS will pass through 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS and capture the final objective.
    The attack will be supported by 9 Field Batteries, 3 Medium Batteries and 2 Heavy Batteries.

    8 March
    1000 Hours Battalion 'O' Group.
    Information: as at Brigade ‘O’ Group.
    Intention: 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS will secure the line of the main road from 165340 to 158347.
    Method: On receiving the order to move the Battalion will leave its present area and march down the road to the AIRFIELD at 127313 which will be the assembly area.
    Order of March: 1 Company, 2 troops of tanks 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 2 Company, 2 troops tanks, Battalion H.Q., 3 Company, 4 Company, R.A.P, Support Company.
    From the assembly area the Battalion will move forward via the 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS centre line and form up behind railway line, which will be the Start Line for the attack.
    The Battalion will attack with two companies forward.
    Right 2 Company objective the ROAD at 154342.
    Left 1 Company objective the ROAD and RAILWAY CROSSING 157347.
    Junction point between the two companies the HOUSE at 162345.
    3 Company will follow up 2 Company, objective the CROSS ROADS 158340.
    4 Company will follow up 1 Company, objective the RAILWAY at 153344.
    Artillery support: On code word THRUSH all the guns supporting the attack will fire on the objective for 30 minutes. The Heavy Mortars will fire on 1 Company’s objective from T to T plus 15.
    Support Company: Anti-Tank Platoon will not move unless ordered. Carrier Platoon will be used in a carrying role. Mortar Platoon will be in Battalion H.Q. area. MMGs will remain in their present position on the escarpment.
    A troop of SP Anti-Tank from 21 ANTI-TANK will be under command and will be under the orders of Officer Commanding Support Company.
    Admin: F2 will move to the area of Battalion H.Q. when the Battalion has moved out. Companies will eat a hot mid-day meal and carry haversack rations.
    Supplies will be brought up by Carrier Platoon after dark.
    R.A.P. will follow the attack along the Centre Line.
    Intercommunications: Battalion H.Q. at the start of the attack will be at WEGENSHOF; it will then move down the Centre Line to the ROAD JUNCTION 153336.
    1400 Hours Battalion 'O' Group.
    The attack will be taking place as planned.
    H Hour is at 1630 hours.
    The Battalion is to be in its Assembly area by 1730 hours and will move of from here at 1630 hours.
    CROSS ROADS 1633 is not a 52 DIVISION objective and accordingly the right of the Battalion will be changed as follows:-
    2 Company objective CROSS ROADS 159340;
    3 Company objective ROAD JUNCTION 154337.
    The Battalion is not to be committed till HAUS LOO has been captured.
    The SCOTS GUARDS attack went in at 1630 hours and the Battalion moved to its Assembly Area without incident.
    The Commanding Officer went to Brigade H.Q. and returned at 1730 hours with the following information:-
    The 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS attack has been successful against stiff opposition.
    52 DIVISION have not yet captured HAUS LOO or ALPON.
    They are to make another attack on these places tomorrow after which the Battalion will put in its attack.
    Tonight the Battalion will take over the ex SCOTS GUARDS positions.
    It is hoped that after tomorrow’s attack the Battalion will be relieved by a unit of 52 DIVISION.
    There was some enemy shelling during the night.

    9 March
    0700 Hours Brigade 'O' Group.
    “AT 0800 HOURS 52 DIVISION attack Phase One HAUS LOO. Phase Two CROSS RODAS 1633. At 1000 hours the Canadians attack Phase One WOOD 1334, Phase Two WINNENTHAL, Phase Three CROSS ROADS 1532.
    The COLDSTREAM attack will be place on completion of the 52 DIVISION Phase One. It will not start before 1100 hours.”
    0830 Hours Battalion 'O' Group.
    “There will be no change on yesterday’s plan. The earliest time across the Start Line is 1100 hours. The original objectives will be taken by 2 and 3 Companies, so that Companies must be ready to move at 30 minutes notice from 0900 hours onwards.
    1100 Hours H Hour will be at 1430.
    1200 Hours The Intelligence Officer was ent to Brigade H.Q. to find out the latest information:-
    On the left the First Phase of the Canadian attack had been successfully completed, but on our right HAUS LOO was still in enemy hands. However the Brigadier had received orders from the General that it was no longer possible to put off the Battalion attack any longer and that the attack must start as arranged whatever the situation in HAUS LOO. If the situation became too hot a slightly modified objective would be considered a very successful outcome.
    1300 Hours The Battalion moved off and started forming up behind the embankment at 1400 hours.
    Once over the embankment 2 Company reported a great deal of fire coming from their right, including an S.P. gun firing from a position to their right rear.
    The Commanding Officer ordered them to go slow till the supporting tanks are able to cross the embankment, which they had some difficulty in doing, one tank being knocked out by a mine on the level crossing at 153334.
    10 minutes later they reported “going ahead O.K. enemy still firing hard”.
    The Commanding Officer ordered a further 15 minutes fire on the objectives and told No. 3 Company not to cross the railway embankment till ordered.
    No. 1 Company were up to their objective and waiting for the barrage to lift.
    As soon as the fire ceased, No. 1 Company reported that they had captured their objective and a lot of Prisoners of War.
    No. 3 Company were ordered forward to their objective and shortly afterwards No. 2 Company reporte that they had reached their objective on the main road.
    The S.P. gun continued firing for some time, an S.P. M10 knocked out by a mine on the track beyond Battalion H.Q. was destroyed, and another tank was hit, by an S.P. firing from the left of No. 1 Company.
    The enemy held on in the houses in front of No. 2 Company and continued firing till dark.
    A large number of Nebelwerfers were in action and continued to fire on the Battalion all night.
    No. 3 Company reported that the enemy were pulling out of HAUS LOO soon after they reached their objective and information was received from Brigade shortly afterwards that 52 DIVISINO were in position there.
    The total number of Prisoners of War taken was 128, mostly from 22 PARA REGIMENT.
    One of them an R.S.M. who drove into 1 Company’s position after dark with a ration lorry.
    Before last light recce parties came up from the 5th Battalion HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY the relieving battalion.
    2100 Hours No. 1 Company reported that a number of enemy probably two Platoons were moving about close in front of them.
    No. 2 Company made a similar report shortly afterwards and a counter-attack was expected but did not take place.
    2230 Hours The relief began, and by 2330 it was successfully completed.
    The Companies marched back to billets in the areas they had occupied the previous night, and Battalion H.Q. went back to the Hunting Lodge.

    10 March
    1200 Hours Sitrep: Towards the early morning quiet set in around the bridgehead, and at first light it was found that the enemy and withdrawn across the RHINE. Except for a slight skirmish to get FORT BLUCHER Operation VERITABLE ended without opposition. The two bridges were both found blown.
    1000 Hours Battalion recce parties were sent back to MOOK to find billets for the Battalion rest area.

    11 March
    The Commanding Officer went on Leave and Major M.E. ADEANE took over command of the Battalion.

    12 March
    The Battalion left BONNINGHARDT at 1300 hours and travelling via GELDERN, KAVELEIER, WEEZE, GOCH, and OTTERSUM arrived at MOOK at 1730 hours.

    13 - 17 March
    -

    18 - 22 March
    No. 4 Company provided a guard on the residence of Mr. Smith VAN OYEN, provisional Governor of North Brabant, during the stay of H.M. QUEEN WILHELMINA.
    The QUEEN inspected the Guards of Honour on several occasions.

    20 March
    Second-in-Command attended preliminary Conference on Operation PLUNDER at Division H.Q.

    22 March
    The Commanding Officer returned from Leave.

    23 March Company Commanders briefed with the plans for Operation PLUNDER.
    British SECOND ARMY is making crossings over the RHINE from REES to WESEL, and the American 9th Army from WESEL to ORSOY.
    30 CORPS with 51 DIVISION is making the assault, and 43 DIVISION, 3 Canadian Division, and GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION under command will cross in the area of REES.
    12 CORPS will be on the right crossing in the area of WESEL.
    The preliminary counter battery starts at 1700 hours and the crossings begin at 2130 hours.
    GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION will not be employed till at the earliest D plus 4, as the bridging operations cannot begin till the bridgehead has been enlarges sufficiently to get the river banks clear of artillery fire.
    After the bridgehead phase is completed 51 DIVISION will advance on BOCHOLD and 42 DIVISION on ANHOLT.
    Next GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION will pass through 43 DIVISION on the axis ANHOLT, GROENLO, HAAKENSBERG.
    11 ARMOURED DIVISION will be advancing on the right of GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION via BOCHOLT and WINTERSWICK.

    24 March
    1800 Hours Sitrep: 51 DIVISION established in ESSERDEN 0553, SPELDROP 0554. Fighting going on in REES. 15 (S) DIVISION established in BISLICH 1343, and two smaller bridgeheads 0847 and 1047. 6TH AIRBORNE in area of HAMKELN 2048 and two bridges captured over the ISSEL. 17th U.S. Airborne area DIERSFORDT 1844. COMMANDOS fighting in WESEL. U.S. 9th Army three bridgeheads across South of WESEL.

    25 March
    Order issued to Companies:-
    "The Battalion is now at six hours’ notice to move. No move is likely before the 27th.”
    1200 Hours Sitrep: The bridgehead have been linked up and contact has been made with the two Airborne Divisions.
    REES is still not clear.

    26 March
    1800 Hours Sitrep: Continuous bridgehead now runs as follows:-
    0257, MULLINGEN 0758, CROSS ROADS 0956, along line of railway to 1451, then due East to the river at 5352, South along river bank to RIINGENBURGE 2243, excl BRUNEN 2648 and due South to the American 9th Army sector where all the bridgeheads are joined and very good progress has been made to the South of the River LIPEE.
    REES is clear and several bridges have been built.
    Both the main enemy counter attack Divisions have been identified.
    15 P.G. on the 12 CORPS sector and 116 Pz Division on the American 9th Army front.
    During the day the Commanding Officer addressed the Companies.

    27 March
    1800 Hours Sitrep: On the flanks of the SECOND ARMY bridgehead opposition has considerably decreased. The 7th ARMOURED DIVISION have reached 3356 without opposition and the Canadians on the left report that they are our of contact with the enemy, who are withdrawing to EMMERICH.
    30 CORPS, attacking towards ANHOLT and ISSELBURG have reached the River AR against stiff resistance.
    Major B.E. LUARD MC took over as Second-in-Command from Major M.E. ADEANE.

    28 March
    1200 Hours Order received “Prepare to move at 1700 hours. Harbour parties to RendezVous at UDEM at 1500 hours. Probable time of move 1900 hours. Tanks and Infantry will not be married.”
    1800 Hours Sitrep: A complete breakout has been achieved on the right.
    6TH GUARDS BRIGADE have reached HALTERN and 7th ARMOURED DIVISION, BORKEN,
    ISSELBURG has been captured, but ANHOLT and BOCHOLT are both held by the enemy.
    2305 Hours The Battalion left MOOK and went via OTTERSUM, GOCH, WEEZE and UDEM to the Battalion area around ROAD JUNCTION 9847 arriving at 0330 hours.

    29 March
    0900 Hours No. 2 Company had 5 casualties as a result of a minefield accident.
    Brigade ‘O’ Group:-
    There has been a complete breakthrough North of the RUHR and 6TH BRIGADE are not nearing MUNSTER.
    On the 30 CORPS sector the pocket around HALTERN has been cleared up and WERTH has been reached.
    Patrols are going for the bridge over the AR at 1861 and 51 DIVISION are now clearing DINXPERLOO.
    43 DIVISION are attacking ANHOLT.
    The enemy consist of 1st Para Army, with 6th Para Division between EMMERICH and ANHOLT, 7 and 8 Para Division between ALTERN and BOHOLT, and 180 and 190 Division on the American 9th Army Sector.
    The counter-attack forces consist of 15 P.G. Division and 116 Pz Division.
    116 Pz Division has been committed on the American Sector, and 15 P.T. Division in the area of BOCHOLT.
    The task of 30 CORPS is to protect the left flank of 2ND BRITISH ARMY by moving on BREMEN and HAMBURG.
    30 CORPS will be led by GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION with 43 DIVISION on the left flank and 3RD DIVISION in a follow-up role.
    5TH BRIGADE will be in the lead.
    32 BRIGADE is now at 3 hours’ notice to move, but no move is likely till tomorrow.
    1600 Hours Battalion 'O' Group:-
    On moving from here, the Battalion will marry up with the 1st Battalion and proceed in the following order:-
    3 Squadron, 3 Company, Joint H.Q., 2 Squadron, 4 Company, 1 Squadron, 1 Company, 2 Company, Support Company, F2 Echelon.
    Route:- Cross the RHINE by LONDON BRIDGE then through REES, ISSELBURG and DINXPERLOO to a harbour area.

    30 March
    At first light 5TH BRIGADE crossed the RHINE and advanced from BOCHOLT to AALTEN which they reached at midday.
    Craters and road blocks slowed up the going.
    1503 Hours The COLDSTREAM Group married up and after crossing the RHINE moved into a harbour area at 1363 near DINXPERLOO, and halted for the night.

    31 March
    The Divisional Centre Line AALTEN, GROENLO, HAAKSBERGEN, appears to be the withdrawal route of 6 Para Division, and continued demolitions and craters are slowing things up so that it has been decided to try and open up another Centre Line on the left for 32 BRIGADE.
    The COLDSTREAM Group is to lead, and at 0630 the Commanding Officer went to Brigade H.Q. to get the details.
    1000 Hours The GRENADIER Group leading 5TH BRIGADE reported that they were engaging the enemy just outside GROENLO.
    1030 Hours The COLDSTREAM Group moved off, but was held up about 3 miles from LICHTENVORDE by the tail of 5TH BRIGADE which halted in the village.
    1430 Hours The route through LICHTENVORDE was cleared and the COLDSTREAM Group were then able to branch off onto the left C.L. which from there goes via ZIEUWENT 1679 BORCULO 1691, BELTRUM 1986, NEEDE 2293 to the bridge at 389043, which crosses the TWENTE Canal.
    1500 Hours The leading Squadron had a small engagement with some enemy and 56 Prisoners of War were captured, a scratch lot made up from various units of 6 Para Division.
    1630 Hours The HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT reported BORCULO to be held, and accordingly a route was taken to the East of it.
    Numerous small streams and canals had to be crossed.
    Over some of them the bridges were blown and others were not strong enough to hold the tanks, which made various diversions necessary, but by 1830 hours the leading Squadron was again engaged with enemy in NEEDE and the concrete works at 2393.
    A tank and an armoured car were knocked out and the enemy held on in their position.
    Another Squadron was sent to the left to try the bridge at 192944 which they found intact and not held but by this time it was too dark to follow it up and the Commanding Officer gave orders for the Group to take up a position for the night as follows:-
    3 Company guarding the bridge at 192944 and at 213928.
    4 Company astride the main road to BORCULO at 900924.
    1 Company guarding the approaches from the East at 913926, and
    2 Company guarding the bridge at 903915.
    During the night there were several small encounters with the enemy and more Prisoners of War were taken, bringing the total up to 10 Officers and 71 Other Ranks.
    2300 Hours Battalion 'O' Group:-
    "The first task for tomorrow is to get over the Canal. If NEEDE is still held a diversion will be made to the West and the Group will go via GEESTEREN 1794 and the bridge at 174960 then over the SCHIPBEEK Canal by any bridge that can be found intact. If NEEDE is clear then the Group will go via the bridge at RIETMOLEN. Our objective is the bridge over the TWENTE Canal at 389043 just North of ENSCHEDE. Further orders will be issued when this has been captured.
    The Squadron HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT will start at first light and dependent on the information about bridges that they send back, the Group will advance by one of the routes given above.
    Order of March:- Recce Troop, 2 Squadron, 4 Company, Joint Battalion H.Q., 1 Squadron, 1 Company, 3 Squadron, 3 Company, 2 Company, Support Company, F2 Echelon.”
    During the night civilians were rung up on the telephone and they said that the enemy were pulling out from NEEDE, but that BORCULO was still held.
    It was not possible to get through to ENSCHEDE.
     
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    March Appendices

    NOMINAL ROLLS, OFFICERS & NCOs
    5CGORB1.JPG 5CGORB2.JPG


    MAPS
    West of Bonninghardt
    5CGMAP1.JPG

    Xanten, Rheinburg
    5CGMAP2.JPG


    FIELD RETURNS
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    GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION

    “FAREWELL TO ARMOUR” PARADE

    ROTENBURG AIRFIELD GERMANY 9 JUNE 1945



    ADDRESS BY FIELD-MARSHAL MONTGOMERY TO THE GUARDS DIVISION - 9, JUNE 1945

    1 . The Field-Marshall began by saying that the German war being over, it was interesting to consider how it was that we had won when in 1940 and in 1941 and even in 1942 it had seemed quite impossible that we should ever win. There were many reasons for this, but he always considered that there were two reasons which were basically the main cause of the enemy’s defeath.

    Firstly, the great mistakes made by the enemy beginning in 1941 when the Germans attacked Russia and Japan attacked the Americans, thus bringing these two great nations in on our side.

    Secondly, the good fighting qualities of the Allied soldiers among whom the fighting man of the British Empire stands out in a proud position.

    2 . The Field-Marshal then went on to speak as follows:

    “And now I want to say something about your Division.

    When this war began the Guards were infantry.

    At a time of great national danger in 1941 the Guards formed armoured formations. The Guards Armoured Division and the 6 Guards Armoured Brigade fought throughout this historic campaign in western Europe.

    I don’t suppose there is any officer in the Army who can speak with such weight of experience as myself about the relative standards of battle efficiency of this or that formation or unit. From Alamein to the Baltic, I have had many formations and units under my command.

    I want to say, here and now, that in the sphere of armoured warfare the Guards have set a standard that it will be difficult for those that come after to reach.

    In modern war it is the cooperation of all arms, armoured and un-armoured, that wins the battle, and in this respect you have achieved great results. In fact, the Guards have shown that whatever they are asked to do - whatever they take on - they do well: maintaining always the highest standards and giving a lead to all others. You will long be remembered for your prowess in armoured war.

    And now you are to return to your traditional role of infantry.

    Some of you may wonder why this is so. There are many reasons.
    First: The King wishes it.
    Second: the Brigade of Guards as a ???le are anxious that this should be done”
    And third: I myself, an infantry soldier of many years service, would say to you that you are needed as infantry. The infantry arm has come right to the fore in this wary; it is the most versatile of all the arms; nothing can be done without infantry to help; there is never enough infantry for the tasks that have to be done.

    It is vital that the infantry of the British Army should be a firm and strong rock on which to build the post war Army. It is the central core of the fighting machine, on which all else depends.

    We need you in the infantry; we need your high standards, your great efficiency in all matters, and your old traditions of duty and service; all these are needed to help weld the infantry arm into a firm and solid basis on which to build.

    And so I welcome you back into the infantry.

    You can look back with pride on your excursion into the realms of armoured war-fare; and the experience there gained will always be valuable to you.”

    3 . The Field-Marshal finally made the following remarks about the Divisional Commander.

    “I don’t know whether the officers and men of the Guards Armoured Division, now the Guards Division, realise how much they owe to General Allan Adair. From my position as Commander-in-Chief I know the answer to this straight away and I can tell you that answer.

    General Allan trained the Division for battle in England; he then took it across the Channel to Normandy and commanded it there in the great battles south of the Seine; he then led it through France; through Belgium; through Holland; then into Germany and commanded it till the war ended.

    Throughout all this time he never failed me and he never failed you; he gave of his best that the Division might do well in battle and he has reaped his full reward. You owe to him more than you can ever repay. And I will go further, I would say that the Brigade of Guards was lucky to have ready an officer like General Allan to handle this armoured matter for them, few officers could have done it so well. In front of you all I wish to congratulate General Allan on having brought the matter to such a successful conclusion.”





    Commander Guards Armoured Division
    Major-General ALLAN ADAIR, CB, DSO, MC


    Commander 5 Guards Armoured Brigade
    Brigadier N.W. GWATKING, DSO, MVO


    Commander 6 Guards Amoured Brigade
    Brigadier W.D.C. GREENACRE, DSO, MVO


    Commander 32 Guards Brigade
    Brigadier G.F. JOHNSON, DSO


    Commander Royal Artillery Guards Armoured Division
    Brigadier H.C. PHIPPS, DSO





    PROGRAMME OF EVENTS

    The Parade is formed up with Guards infantry units and representative detachment flanking the Saluting Base.

    In the centre of the Arena the units facing the Saluting Base include 5 Guards Armoured Brigade, 2 Household Cavalry Regiment, Royal Artillery Regiments, Royal Signals and 2 Armoured Welsh Guards.

    1 . Commander-in-Chief arrives and the “General Salute” takes place.

    2 . Inspection of the Guards Armoured Division by the Commander-in-Chief.

    3 . The Final Salute by the Armour.

    4 . The departure of the Armour and the Farewell to the Guards Armoured Division.

    5 . 5 and 6 Guards Brigades and 2 Household Cavalry Regiment (as Divisional Reconnaissance Regiment) take their place in the ranks of the Guards Division.

    NATIONAL ANTHEM.





    GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION

    September 1941 - June 1945


    The Guards Armoured Division was formed in the summer of 1941 as a direct result of the expected German invasion of Great Britain, and assembled in September around Warminster. Originally 6 Guards Armoured Brigade was included in the Division but it later became and Independent Tank Brigade. Most of the units and Services have been with the Division since the beginning, including the Leicestershire Yeomanry and 21 Anti-Tank Regiment which are now leaving.

    After prolonged training on Salisbury Plain, in Norfolk, and on the Yorkshire Wolds, the Guards Armoured Division landed in France last June and it had two months of hard fighting in the Normandy bridgehead. The Division then crossed the River Seine and took part in the sensational advance through Belgium into Holland, completing then the most rapid advance of a Division in history - from Douai to Brussels, 97 miles, in 14 hours.

    Units of the Division were first of the Allied ground forces to enter Holland and Germany for it was a patrol of 21 Anti-Tank Regiment that crossed the German frontier on the 21 September 1944.

    During the Winter and early Spring, the Division was busily engaged in battle and then on 30 March it crossed the River Rhine finally ending up at Cuxhaven. During this last advance of some 400 miles the Divisional Sappers built no less than 50 bridges.

    6 Guards Armoured Brigade, which is now welcomed back into the Division, took part in much hard fighting in the Normandy bridgehead and throughout the campaign has supported a dozen different divisions in battle. It was in the forefront of the advance from the Rhine to the Baltic and one once occasion the Churchill tanks completed 66 miles in seven hours.
     
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    1 April 1945
    At first light the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT set out and at 0730 hours they reported NEEDE clear of enemy and the bridge JRIEMOLEUS 2694 unblown.
    The COLDSTREAM Group then moved off from JONKER BLOO 203922 in the order:-
    2 Squadron, 4 Company, Joint H.Q., 1 Squadron, 1 Company, 3 Squadron, ARVs, 3 Company, 2 Company, Support Company, F2 Echelon.
    0800 Hours There was a slight engagement at BEEKUM and 110 Prisoners of War belonging to a stragglers unit were captured.
    0915 Hours The leading Squadron on reaching the bridge over the TWENTE KANAL at 3204 succeeded in rushing it, but only the leading Troop got across before the bridge blew up and the far bank was found to be held by several 88s and Infantry on the canal bank. 6 tanks were knocked out during the engagement.
    0930 Hours 1 Company/1 Squadron Group were sent off to try and get round where the canal comes to an end in the town of ENSCHEDE. On reaching the canal they met one of the tanks which crossed the bridge and had managed to get round. It reported a great deal of opposition and 1 Company/1 Squadron Group were ordered to stand fast just short of the bottom end of the canal while a further plan was made.
    1100 Hours As all the other bridges in this area were reported blown it was decided to continue with the plan of turning the canal line by going through ENSCHEDE, but that it woud be necessary in view of the size of the town to use all the 5th COLDSTREAM GUARDS to form a bridgehead in the N.W. corner of the town around the end of the canal to allow the armour to get through the built up area and on to our objective - the road junction 3910 on the main road to OLDENZAAL.
    1230 Hours 1 Company with support from a troop of tanks established itself on the line of the road from 404038 to 412037.
    1300 Hours 4 Company went through to the line of the road from 404038 to 412037.
    1315 Hours 2 Company took up a position by the railway 405027 guarding the Southern flank. Opposition was very slight. Several Prisoners of War were taken. The enemy on the canal bank remained in position and continued to be quite aggressive with an 88mm.
    1400 Hours IRISH GUARDS Group reported only a few miles South of ENSCHEDE coming up from HAAKENSBERG.
    1430 Hours 1 Squadron passed through the Battalion and reached the road junction at 1039 after forcing a road block North of the town. The Brigade Commander then ordered the SCOTS/WELSH Group to pass through and get OLDENZAAL.
    1700 Hours 2 Company were ordered to join the Squadron at 1030, but they found the SCOTS/WELSH Group held up just North of the town and unable to get on, mainly due to another road block covered by 88mm. They were accordingly ordered to return and spend the rest of the night with the Battalion in ENSCHEDE.
    1730 Hours 6 enemy hospitals with about 5,000 wounded in them were taken over.

    2 April
    0900 Hours OLDENZAAL reported clear.
    1030 Hours The COLDSTREAM Group moved off following the SCOTS GUARDS/WELSH GUARDS Group and Brigade H.Q.
    1100 Hours Leading Group held up by blown bridge over canal at 5121. 5 Brigade who also passed through ENSCHEDE and OLDENZAAL before turning East, reported that they were held up by stiff opposition at POPEE 3112.
    1500 Hours The canal having been bridged, the Group continued and reached NORDHORN which was found to be strongly defended.
    1800 Hours The SCOTS/WELSH Group successfully attacked and captured NORDHORN. The town contains three river obstacles all with bridges partially or wholly blown, and further work will be necessary before the advance can be resumed. The Battalion accordingly harboured for the night in the woods at 482168 just outside DENEKAMP.

    3 April
    0630 Hours The Commanding Officer went to Brigade H.Q. The present situation is as follows:-
    “During the night the SCOTS/WELSH Group continued their advance and they have reached the EMS at SHEPSDORF 7034. Two Sections got across the river - the bridge then blew up, and they have had to be withdrawn. The bridges in NORDHORN are not yet ready, but the COLDSTREAM Group will be able to move soon after 0930 hours, when they will go up and join the remainder of the Brigade.
    3 BRITISH DIVISION are being brought up to force the crossing of the EMS and the EMS Canal.
    5 BRIGADE have met stiff opposition outside BENTHEIM and are still held up.”
    0945 Hours The Group moved off across the German frontier then through NORDHORN to MITTELLOHNE. On arrival the Commanding Officer placed the companies so as to form a protective flank to the North, with 3 Company at 685364, 4 Company NORDLOHNE 666366, 2 Company 662353, 1 Company MITTELLOHNE 665341, Battalion H.Q. 665242.
    1430 Hours The HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT reported that they had found an unblown bridge over the EMS at 684388. The COLDSTREAM Group were ordered to seize it and the 1st Battalion with No. 3 Squadron and No. 3 Company went off to get it. After making a recce the Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion saw that it was held and that there were bombs on the bridge ready to blow it up, so he decided that it would not be practical to rush the bridge and he gave out orders for a planned attack. A heavy stink was put down all around the bridge, the Squadron then moved into position on the edge of a wooded escarpment from where they shot up the bridge about 400 yards away, and put down smoke. They also fired typhoon rockets which had a great effect. Under core of this fire two platoons got up to the river either side of the bridge. The Company Commander then cut the wires leading to the bombs and the third platoon crossed over and attacked the enemy on the other end of the bridge. The tanks had to demolish a road block before they could get across, but after a short while all resistance had been overcome.
    The bridge was defended by a scratch body of Flak troops and infantry, 42 were taken Prisoner, 10 Wounded and 40 Killed. There were 3 88mm’s defending the bridge, also 2 20mm Anti-Aircraft guns, and on the bridge itself there were eight aerial bombs.
    The bridge was captured by 1900 hours and at 2000 hours the position was strengthened by bringing up No. 2 Company and another Squadron.

    4 April
    In the early hours of the morning the 185 BRIGADE of 3 BRITISH DIVISION captured ALTENLINGEN 6938 and crossed the DORTMUND-EMS Canal without opposition, though the bridge had been blown. They then turned South towards LINGEN.
    1200 Hours No. 2 Company with a squadron of tanks were ordered to clear Southwards between the river and the canal while the Carrier Platoon blocked the North. Owing to a misunderstanding they only cleared as far as the stream 705367. 17 Prisoners of War were taken.
    1600 Hours No. 3 Company carried on the mopping up operation. A large number of enemy were in the barracks at 705364 holding out in pillboxes and it was necessary to put in an attack. This was successfully carried out and 137 Prisoners of War taken, a large number of them members of the notorious Brandenburg Regiment. The Company then went on to the main LINGEN road and occupied a position across the river opposite the SCOTS GUARDS at 707352. The barracks were found to contain a great deal of equipment.
    Enemy aircraft were noticeably active during the day.

    5 April
    1800 Hours After mid-day 2 Company and later 3 Company were relieved by 3 DIVISION and returned to the Battalion. 3 DIVISION have cleared morst of LINGEN and bridging over the river and the canal on the main road had begun.
    The advance is to be rescued tomorrow with the SCOTS/WELSH Group in the lead. By first light it is unlikely that the main bridges will be ready, and the Brigade will use the bridges at 684388 and 702384.
    2100 Hours Brigade ‘O’ Group:-
    “During the day there have been two counter attacks on LINGEN but the situation is now cleared up. The GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISINO is to resume its advance on BREMEN tomorrow. 32 BRIGADE will be in the lead until two Centre Lines become available. 5 BRIGADE here have been relieved by 51 DIVISION who will continue to clear their original Centre Line up to the EMS.
    The SCOTS/WELSH Group will lead 32 BRIGADE, and cross via COLDSTREAM Bridge at 0800 hours. By 1000 hours it is hoped that the main bridges opposite LINGEN will be completed and the rest of the Brigade will cross via there.
    A careful watch for enemy aircraft must be kept up as fighter cover will not be in full strength till the day after tomorrow and the G.A.F. has been quite active.

    6 April
    1000 Hours The SCOTS/WELSH Group had great difficulty in getting under way right from the start. LAXTON was held and contained a road block. After forcing this they were again held up by mines, a road block, and large numbers of enemy in the woods West of REMSEL.
    1400 Hours The SCOTS/WELSH Group were unable to make any progress on the REMSEL THUINE road and changed on to the other C.L. running through LENGERICH.
    1530 Hours COLDSTREAM Group ordered to advance and continue to try and force the REMSEL route where the SCOTS/WELSH left off.
    1600 Hours The COLDSTREAM Group left MITTELLOHNE in the order:-
    1 Squadron, 1 Company, Joint H.Q., 2 Squadron, 4 Company, 3 Squadron, 2 Company, 3 Company, Support Company, F2 Echelon.
    1730 Hours The COLDSTREAM Group reached LAXTON and moved on to the abandoned SCOTS GUARDS / WELSH GUARDS route to continue clearing towards REMSEL.
    The situation was found to be as follows:-
    An enemy gun covers the open stretch of the road from the wood at 734359 onwards. In the next wood up the road there is a mined block at 752353. The SCOTS GUARDS/WELSH GUARDS Group were held up just beyond this by heavy M.G. fire coming from the woods just West of REMSEL. They then withdrew and started up the LENGERICH road.
    The Commanding Officer decided to put in a Company/Squadron attack to clear the woods and REMSEL, moving up the left of the road.
    This attack was made by 1 Company/1 Squadron Group and started at 1800 hours. At 1845 hours the Commanding Officer went forward and found that REMSEL had been successfully cleared and that No. 1 Company were also in BACKUM. No. 4 Company/2 Squadron Group was ordered to move up and occupy the CROSS ROADS in 7734. No. 3 Company moved into RMESEL and No. 2 Company was placed to guard the route up from any attack from the South. Battalion H.Q. was established in REMSEL. 30 Prisoners of War from I Bn 20 Para were captured.
    2200 Hours Brigade ‘O’ Group:-
    Tomorrow the SCOTS GUARDS/WELSH GUARDS Group are to advance from NORDHORN 8039 through LENGERICH and up SPADE route (ie OHRTE 9645, BERGE 0047, MENSLAGE 0553, QUAKENBRUCK 1453).
    The COLDSTREAM Group will advance from RAMSEL, capture THUINE 8333 then turn North, rejoin SPADE route at LENGERICH and follow the SCOTS GUARDS/WELSH GUARDS Group, thus allowing 5 BRIGADE to pass through them and advance down CLUB Route (ie THUINE, FURSTENAU, ANKUM).
    In order to start the groups moving, a barrage moving at 100 yards in 3 minutes will precede them down the road to their respective objectives. From 0700 - 0800 hours the Artillery will be firing in front of the SCOTS GUARDS/WELSH GUARDS Group, then it will switch and fire the programme for the COLDSTREAM Group.
    Typhoons will also be available. After the COLDSTREAM Group have captured THUINE they will leave a Company behind to hold the village till relieved by 5 BRIGADE.

    7 April
    0800 Hours The COLDSTREAM Group advanced in the following order:-
    1 Squadron, 3 Squadron carrying 4 Company, Joint H.Q., 2 Squadron carrying 2 Company, 3 Company, 1 Company, Support Company, F2 Echelon.
    0945 Hours A typhoon attack was put in on THUINE. The tanks then entered the village, which was captured with little difficulty. No. 3 Company occupied the village while the rest of the Group moved on up to the woods and halted at .91 in 8435 awaiting the capture of LENGERICH.
    By 1230 the SCOTS GUARDS/WELSH GUARDS Group were still unable to capture LENGERICH, however the 1st Battalion Recce Troop going Eastward between the enemy in LENGERICH and an enemy position around CROSS ROADS 857354, reported that they had reached HESTRUP 8940 without opposition.
    It was not possible for the whole of the Group to follow them as the roads and tracks were impassible for wheels. A squadron was despatched to join them however while the Battalion moved up on foot to occupy the CROSS ROADS at 873374. By 1530 hours the Battalion less 3 Company had occupied the CROSS ROADS and the Recce troop and the Squadron were in position astride the main road at HANDRUP and shooting up the enemy withdrawing from LENGERICH.
    1600 Hours Leaving 2 Company to hold the CROSS ROADS the remainder of the Battalion then moved on via RMING 8838 and HESTRUP 8940 to join the tanks at HANDRUP and take up a position astride the main road.
    1800 Hours The Battalion was established with 4 Company on the main road facing West and 1 Company facing East together with all the 1st Battalion less 1 Squadron remaining guarding the CROSS ROADS 8735 with 2 Company.
    1900 Hours The SCOTS GUARDS/WELSH GUARDS Group entered LENGERICH and tanks contacted No. 4 Company down the main road. It was then possible to bring up 3 Company and the Battalion transport via LENGERICH and the main road. No. 2 Company were ordered to continue holding the CROSS ROADS during the night.
    During the day 111 Prisoners of War were captured, mostly from 7 Para Division, which is withdrawing via LENGERICH and BERGE towards QUACKENBRUCK. The exception to this was a Company of 104 P.G.R. stragglers of 15 Pz Division who were impounded by 7 Para Division to hold THUINE.
    There was no Brigade ‘O’ Group, but the COLDSTREAM Group has been ordered to continue the advance tomorrow.
    5 BRIGADE on their C.L. are just short of FREREN which is strongly held.
    A noticeable feature of the day was the re-appearance of the enemy’s artillery, which was quite active, particularly in shelling THUINE.

    8 April
    The 1st Battalion Recce Troop started off at 0700 hours, but almost immediately was held up by an S.P. gun firing from 903414, and it was 0800 hours before this was dealt with and the main column got under way. Enemy artillery was also active and shelled the column on leaving.
    Between HANDRUP and BERGE five road blocks were encountered - generally they were manned and often booby trapped which caused some delay. S.P. guns operating from various positions on the right flank of the Battalion caused difficulties, as they often managed to continue in action long after the head of the Battalion had passed, and it was necessary to leave detachments guarding all the main roads leading on to the C.L. after the first company/squadron group had passed. OHRTE 9644 was shelled and harassed by artillery and S.P. guns while the Battalion went through and similar incidents were frequent.
    By 1200 hours the leading troops after clearing two road blocks in the forest 945, were approaching BERGE, while a squadron with a troop of HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT looping round the the left, had reached GRAFELD 9547.
    The recce troop went out to observe BERGE from the South East. They found that it was occupied and a large amount of traffic was going down the road to the South. This they shot up.
    Two alternative plans were made to capture the town. Firstly to put down all available fire power and hope to flush the enemy out with a squadron of tanks. Secondly to follow up the squadron with a company clearing the buildings in three stages, to be followed by another company if the going proved difficult.
    Typhoons were called for and came into action at 1430 hours, followed by a 4.2 mortar shoot. Meanwhile the squadron moved up and started to approach the town from the South. Two tanks were knocked out by bazookas and the squadron had to pull back while No. 4 Company cleared from South to North. The first half was carried out without undue difficulty but in the North East corner a pocket of enemy held out most stubbornly and was only cleared up after several attempts.
    No. 1 Company supported by another squadron then passed through the town from East to West, captured the buildings in 0147 and established themselves in the area of the ROAD JUNCTION at 024476, having dealt with a large number of enemy and an Anti-Tank gun.
    These operations were completed by 1800 hours and the Group moved into position to the East of the ROAD JUNCTION 024476. No. 1 Company on arrival on their objective linked up with the Squadron that had looped to the left via BORSTEL 9750 and rejoined the C.L. at 038485 after having successfully dealt with an enemy position at 613527 where they knocked out an Anti-Tank gun.
    The final dispositions for the night were as follows:-
    2 Company 026469;
    1 Company 033476;
    3 Company 032482;
    4 Company 028484;
    Battalion H.Q. VONWENDE 025423.
    During the day 106 Other Ranks and 1 Officer were taken Prisoner of War; mostly from units of 7 Para Division and 30 March Battalion.
    5 BRIGADE have captured FURSTENAU.

    9 April
    At first light the SCOTS/WELSH Group took over the lead and pressed on to 040532 just short of MENSLAGE. Progress was very slow owing to the large number of water obstacles that had to be bridged. During the course of these operations no less than five bridges were put up.
    The COLDSTREAM Group took over the protection of the ROAD JUNCTION at 006464 with a Platoon of 2 Company, but was no otherwise involved in operation, and remained in the area just East of BERGE.

    10 April
    1600 Hours The Commanding Officer held a Company Commanders’ Conference:-
    The SCOTS/WELSH Group have cleared MENSLAGE and reached 048548. Today again all the bridges have been blown and no further progress is likely. 5 BRIGADE have cleared HIPPEN 0042 and SCHWAGSTORF 0035 and area now directed on ANKUM.
    For the future there are three possibilities:-
    (1 ) To abandon the 32 BRIGADE C.L. and move down to the 5 BRIGADE C.L. 32 BRIGADE to be in the lead tomorrow.
    (2 ) To continue with the 32 BRIGADE C.L. the COLDSTREAM Group to force the crossing of the R. HASE.
    (3 ) To continue as above 5 BRIGADE to open up a route North to join 32 BRIGADE. It is desired to get the whole Division on to one C.L. as soon as possible so as to rest the Groups more frequently.
    2000 Hours Brigade ‘O’ Group:-
    43 DIVISION directed on LONINGEN 0160 are now only about 7 miles away, approaching the town from the West. 5 BRIGADE are through HIPPEN and DOTHEN and have now reached 0643 on their way up to join 32 BRIGADE.
    51 DIVISION have been directed on QUACKENBRUCK.
    The SCOTS/WELSH GUARDS have been ordered to form a firm bridgehead across the canal 048549 for the COLDSTREAM Group to start tomorrow morning, and to clear backwards from MENSLAGE to road junction 055522 where the present route loops to the left.
    Tomorrow 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS with whatever armour from 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS that they require in support, will position themselves on the R. HASE with a view to forcing a crossing at 036562 that night.
    2 Field regiments, 2 Medium regiments and the Heavy Mortar Platoon will be available to support the operation.
    2130 Hours Battalion 'O' Group:-
    Information: As in Brigade ‘O’ Group.
    Intention: 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS will advance to the near bank of the R. HASE with a view to forcing a crossing at dark.
    Method: The Battalion will leave its present location at 0500 hours and motor to HERBERGEN where the Battalion will debus.
    Main Battalion H.Q. will be established at 045553. At 0600 hours 2 Company will advance down the axis of the road with a troop of tanks, and provided no opposition holds them up, will take up a position by the track junction 038579. They will be followed by Tac Battalion H.Q. and at 800 yards intervals, 3 Company, 1 Company, 4 Company. On arrival 3 Company will position themselves on the bank from 033562 to the road, 1 Company from excl. the road to the 04 Grid, 4 Company area 035577.
    The squadron of tanks in support to go to the area 041579. If the bridge is unblown the squadron wil be on call to force a crossing.
    The fire support will be on call, and consists of a series of concentrations down the length of the road that can be immediately called for if any enemy are encountered.
    Admin: Breakfasts 0415. Haversack rations will be carried and a hot meal eaten before the crossing.
    Intercommunications: After the position on the river bank is established, Main Battalion H.Q. will move up and join Tac Battalion H.Q. at 037579. F2 will be in the present area.

    11 April
    The Battalion moved off from BERGE, debased at HERBERGEN, and formed up across the canal ready to start the attack at 0630. 1 vehicle was blown up on a one on the way up.
    0630 Hours 2 Company advanced up the road without meeting any opposition, and by 0830 hours the Battalion was established on the banks of the river as arranged. The bridged was found to be blown, and the enemy were lining the opposite bank of the river and covering our side with small arms fire, which made the recce of the crossing site very difficult.
    1030 Hours After the Commanding Officer had inspected the banks he decided to make the crossing at 037582, where there was a wood and a small embankment to provide cover behind which the assault boats could be got up, and the Company assembled for the attack.
    No. 2 Company was to be the first across, and recce parties were sent off to see the site in daylight and put out tape up to the approaches.
    1230 Hours An escaping French Prisoner of War brought news that at 064578 there was an unblown bridge. No. 4 Company were sent off with a troop of tanks to see whether it would be possible to capture the bridge and avoid the assault crossing which looked like being a difficult operation with the enemy so close up on the opposite bank where no artillery fire could be brought down on them.
    1330 Hours No. 4 Company found that the bridge had actually been blown, but that a few planks still remained, making it possible to cross on foot. The opposite bank was held, but they managed to attack across the remnants of the bridge and establish themselves [on] the other side. The Commanding Officer then ordered No. 2 Company to take over the bridge site while 4 Company pushed on and captured the village of BOKAH 0658. No. 3 Company followed by no. 1 Company to move up to join them.
    1700 Hours The Commanding Officer met the Brigadier back at Main Battalion H.Q. to arrange the next move. It was decided that the Battalion should advance through to the West edge of the BURENTANNEN wood and attack the village of BOEN from there, then to clear the bridge site.
    Fire support was arranged for the attack, which was to be carried out at 1730 if possible so as to give the ROYAL ENGINEERS some daylight for their bridging operation.
    1530 Hours [sic] With 3 Company in the lead the Battalion proceeded to advance through the woods towards the F.U.P. for the attack. Scattered enemy had to be dealt with on the way and enemy S.P. guns shelled the crossing very accurately.
    1745 Hours The Battalion was in position with the right No. 1 Company, left 3 Company, and behind them right 4 Company and left 2 Company.
    The Commanding Officer then fixed 1830 as H Hour and gave out orders for the attack on BOEN.
    Attack to be made with two companies forward. Right 1 Company objective North end of BOEN. Left 3 Company objective WOOD 035588, clearing South end of BOEN on the way. No. 2 Company to follow up, then swing South and clear the river bank, objective WOOD 034586 with one Platoon on the bridge site. [Handwritten addition -] Res. - 4 Company.
    S.L. the forward edge of the wood.
    1830 Hours The attack went in and by 2000 hours the operation was completed. The companies advanced against considerable small arms fire, and in the village a great deal of sniping and firing from windows went on till the clearing was completed. The enemy on the river bank also held their ground and were only dealt with after a severe battle.
    2030 Hours Bridging commenced. Battalion maintained by ferry system over the river, the roundabout route being unguarded and impassable except on foot.
    2100 Hours 4 Company moved to area 037584.
    During the day 192 Prisoners of War were captured. The night was undistributed except by an occasional shell from S.Ps.

    12 April
    0600 Hours Brigade reported completed.
    0600 Hours Patrol sent to ROAD JUNCTINO 023596 where they linked up with troops of 43 DIVISION in LONINGEN.
    Platoon/Troop Groups sent to ROAD and TRACK JUNCTIONS 034600 and 042604 to ensure S.L. of 5 BRIGADE.
    0800 Hours 5 BRIGADE led by HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT took up the lead.
    2000 Hours During the day 5 BRIGADE cleared ESSEN 1458, then turned North directed on GAPPELN 2668. 43 DIVISION are approaching CLOPPENBURG 2173 and 51 DIVISION have captured VECHTA 3759.
    Tomorrow 32 BRIGADE with COLDSTREAM Group leading area to advance East from ESSEN with via VESTRUP to EMSTEK 2772 which will be a temporary rest area.

    13 April
    1200 Hours The Battalion married up with the 1st Battalion and advanced to LUSCHE 2461 meeting only road blocks and token resistance. LUSCHE itself was found to be defended, and an attack was put in with 3 Company and a squadron of tanks. Just before the attack the column was bombed by own aircraft. The attack was put in, and the enemy fled without putting up any resistance though 35 of them were rounded up in the woods to the South.
    The Group then continued the advance and met no more enemy till VESTRUP where the tanks caught up with and engaged a retreating column of enemy. Here the Group was ordered to harbour for the night.
    2000 Hours Brigade ‘O’ Group:-
    Tomorrow is to be a mopping up operation. As the two Brigades are to be crossed over 5 BRIGADE will clear the 32 BRIGADE area namely EMSTECK, GAPPELN, TENSTEDT, and 32 BRIGADE will clear the 5 BRIGADE and Divisional H.Q. area BUHREN, LANGFORDEN, VESTRUPT, HAUSTETTE.
    The HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT will contact 51 DIVISION at BACKUM. No move from present areas will be ordered til the reports on the clearing up operations are received.
    The move to final areas will take place about midday. Recce parties will go with an escort of tanks. It is hoped that there will be no move from these areas for four to five days.

    14 April
    The clearing operation was carried out by the 1st Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS with a Platoon of infantry with the two squadrons conducting the Operation and further reinforcements on call. No opposition was encountered though 30 Prisoners of War taken, and at 1200 hours recce parties were sent to EMSTECK.
    1330 Hours The Battalion moved with the 1st Battalion following, and at 1600 hours the Battalion was reported settled in at EMSTECK.

    15 - 16 April
    48 hours Maintenance and Rest in area of EMSTECK 2872.

    17 April
    GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION moved to command of XII CORPS which is in action between the WESTER and the ELBE while XXX CORPS prepares for the attack on BREMEN.
    1000 Hours Battalion left EMSTECK and went via VECHTA 3760, SULINGEN 7354, NIENBURG on the WESER 9950, RETHEN 1266 to a concentration area behind 7 ARMOURED DIVISION at EILSDORF 1570, arriving at 1830 hours.

    18 April
    With 5 BRIGADE on the right passing through 7 ARMOURED DIVISION in SOLTAU 4190 and directed up North to cut the BREMEN HAMBURG Autobahn, 32 GUARDS BRIGADE passed through WALSRODE 2475 directed on VISSELHOVEDE with the SCOTS/WELSH Group in the lead.
    The SCOTS/WELSH Group were unable to capture VISSELHOVEDE and the COLDSTREAM Group was then ordered to loop to the right and capture NEUENKIRCHEN 3294. NEUENKIRCHEN was found held, but an attack was put in by 3 Company/3 Squadron Group and the town was successfully captured by 1300 hours.
    The COLDSTREAM Group then took up a position in NEUENKIRCHEN with 2 Company/1 Squadron Group down the VISSELHOVEDE at SCHWITCHEN 2591.
    For the next day the COLDSTREAM Group were ordered to make a staged attack on VISSELHOVEDE from the North East.

    19 April
    0830 Hours 2 Company/Squadron Group made a recce in force into VISSELHOVEDE and got in meeting only light opposition; the rest of the Group were then able to follow on and occupy their objectives without difficulty.
    By midday the occupation was completed and the COLDSTREAM Group was ordered to return to its original C.L. handing over VISSELHOVEDE to the SCOTS/WELSH Group. Later in the day VISSELHOVEDE was sharply counter attacked.
    1 Company/1 Squadron Group made a loop to the left via SCHWALINGEN 3002, directed on to DEEPEN 2404, while 4 Company/2 Squadron from SCHWALINGEN attacked and captured TEWEL 2998. By this time the light was failing and 4 Company/2 Squadron after pushing up to SOHLINGEN 2699 found the next village held.
    Battalion H.Q. then moved into TEWEL and the Group harboured for the night. 87 Prisoners of War were taken all from 2nd Marine Division.

    20 April
    0900 Hours 3 Company/3 Squadron passed through 4 Company and successfully cleared HEMSLINGEN. There was little opposition but some Prisoners of War were taken.
    The Group then moved on and at 1000 hours joined up with 1 Company/1 Squadron at DEEPDEN. During the night the burgomaster of WESTERVEDE surrendered the village to them, which they accordingly occupied.
    The HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT then passed through, and reaching the WOODS at 1908 reported SCHEESSEL held. The Burgomaster was rung up on the telephone from ESTERVEDE and told to surrender the town. This he agreed to do and at 1130 with the Burgomaster on the leading tank 1 Company/1 Squadron entered the town and the surrender was successfully completed without incident.
    1230 Hours The remainder of the COLDSTREAM Group in position in SCHEESSEL as follows:-
    1 Company/1 Squadron blocking main HAMBURG ROAD at 174098;
    4 Company blocking road to the North at the BRIDGE 165100;
    3 Company on the main road to BREMEN at 167093;
    Battalion H.Q. at 171094.
    1430 Hours 2 Company which had been left behind holding open the C.L. was released and took up a position to the South of the town at 171092.
    1500 Hours Battalion 'O' Group:-
    Information: 5 BRIGADE cut the Autobahn and are on the outskirts of BREMEN, holding the villages of HEESWINGEN 0625; WIERSDEN 0623; FRANKENBOSTEL 0721; ELSDORF 0717. 15 Pz Division has appeared in this area and has been counter attacking.
    The SCOTS/WELSH Group have been ordered to capture ROTENBURG from the South West leaving the C.L. at HEMSLINGEN and they have been shelling the village. At present the SCOTS/WELSH Group have reached BROCEL which is occupied and they have been held up.
    3 Company/1 Squadron are to move down the BREMEN road and approach ROTENBURG from the North East. If it is not occupied they are to seize it pending the arrival of the SCOTS/WELSH Group.
    2 Company are to clear up the road to HELVSIEK which is to be the Division H.Q. area. 5 BRIGADE are responsible for clearing down the road from ELSDORF to link up with the Battalion at SCHEESSEL.
    1800 Hours 2 Company returned having completed their task without meeting opposition. The move of Divisional H.Q. has been cancelled however owing to the trouble at BORKEL.
    1900 Hours 3 Company/1 Squadron reached the railway crossing at 1405 where they met an enemy position. A successful attack was put in and they captured 165 Prisoners of War.
    2100 Hours SCHEESSEL was found to be a large German hospital town, a factor which had helped in its surrender. A Medical Lieutenant-Colonel was sent from the Hospital through 3 Company to demand the surrender of ROTENBURG which is also a large hospital town. However after an interview with the Officer in Command he returned to say that they intended to hold ROTENBURG to the last man, last round.
    35 more Prisoners of War were taken during the night, mostly from units cut off and broken up in the surrounding countryside, all of which it has not been possible to mop up completely.

    21 April
    0800 Hours Brigade Conference:-
    ROTENBURG is to be captured by a joint COLDSTREAM Group, SCOTS/WELSH Group attack.
    First Phase. Is for the COLDSTREAM Group to secure down the road to the front of the WOODS at 1304 which is to be their Start Line, and the SCOTS GUARDS up their lard to the edge of the WOODS 1302, which will be their S.L.
    In the town the dividing line will be between the two parallel main streets that run from East to West.
    In support of the attack there will be 2 Field regiments, 1 Medium regiment, Troop S.P. Anti-Tank, Heavy Mortar Platoon, Platoon M.M.Gs.
    Z Hour will be fixed when both S.Ls. have been secured.
    1115 Hours 3 Company and 3 Squadron have cleared the Battalion S.L. and taken 150 Prisoners of War. During this fighting the Company Commander Captain I.O. LIDDELL was wounded and died shortly afterwards.
    The SCOTS/WELSH Group are held up at the RAILWAY CROSSING at 170015.
    1130 Hours Battalion 'O' Group:-
    Information: See Brigade ‘O’ Group.
    Intention: COLDSTREAM Group will attack and capture the Northern half of ROTENBURG.
    Method: The Battalion will advance with two Companies forward.
    Right 4 Company - Objective STREETS area 118034;
    Left 2 Company - Objective STREETS area 120034.
    On capture of these objectives 1 Company will pass through 4 Company and clear the block of houses area 116031.
    Finally 3 Company will pass through 1 Company and consolidate in the N.W. end of the town area 111033.
    Fire Support: From H - 15 to H + 30, 2 Field regiments, 1 Medium regiment, Heavy Mortar Platoon, M.M.G. Platoon, and troop 21 ANTI-TANK will be firing a supporting programme.
    Armour: 2 Squadron will remain in SCHEESSEL with the Carrier Platoon, as a Garrison till the Battalion is able to return.
    3 Squadron will cover the left flank of the advance by firing from the ground just North of the S.L.
    1 Squadron will give close suppor to the two forward companies. The Battalion will move from its present location as a Group in the order:-
    1 Squadron, 4 Company, Joint H.Q., 2 Company.
    1230 Hours 2 Squadron mopping up WOHLSDORF 1505 captured a flak battery, 90 Prisoners of War and 6 88mm Flak guns.
    1300 Hours The Commanding Officer went down to 3 Company to recce the S.L He found that a number of 88s firing from the high ground North of ROTENBURG were giving some trouble and suitable alterations were made to the fire plan. The enemy have also got some Nebelwerfers in action. He informed Brigade that the Battalion would be able to start at 1500, but must have 90 minutes’ notice before the final time is given.
    1600 Hours The SCOTS/WELSH Group were unable to fix an H Hour before 1800 hours and accordingly the attack was put off till the next day, H Hour to be 0930. 53 DIVISION have cut the road running South East from ROTENBURG close to the town. Tomorrow their Division Artillery will also be available to support the attack, and after the town has been consolidated a unit from 53 DIVISION will take over.
    1700 Hours 1 Company sent up to strengthen 3 Company’s position during the night.

    22 April
    0930 Hours 2 and 4 Companies reached their objectives with only slight opposition and captured a number of Prisoners of War and a Field gun.
    1030 Hours 1 Company passed through and reported their objective captured.
    1100 Hours 3 Company passed through 1 Company. They found the bridge on the road out of the town blown and some enemy holding out in a house in the Western outskirts but this was fairly easily dealt with.
    1200 Hours Position reported consolidated and link up made with SCOTS GUARDS.
    1300 Hours There was a small skirmish on the road East of the town where some enemy were found to have hidden in cellars during the attack, but those were soon mopped up by 2 Company.
    After the attack the enemy shelled the town with Nebelwerfers and 88s.
    1400 Hours The Commanding Officer met the Brigade Commander to the South of the town to receive orders on the take over. After the relief the Battalion is to return to SCHEESSEL. It is hoped that the Battalion will be able to rest tomorrow. The next day the Battalion will be under command of 5 BRIGADE for an attack with the 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS on ZEVEN.
    The SCOTS/WELSH Group are to move to a rest area at HAMERSEN 1718.
    1600 Hours The Battalion was relieved by OX AND BUCKS from 53 DIVISION, and returned to SCHEESSEL.

    23 April
    1400 Hours The Commanding Officer attended a Conference at 5 BRIGADE to arrange the details for the attack on ZEVEN.

    24 April
    0800 Hours The Battalion left SCHEESSEL and moved via HELVSIEK 1714: SITTENSEN 1721: and WEERTZEN to the Battalion Assembly Area for the attack on ZEVEN in the little village of WIERSDORF 0623.
    1045 Hours No. 1 Company on the right of the road and No. 4 Company on the left moved into their F.U.Ps. in the forward edge of the village, while the remainder of the Battalion moved in behind.
    1100 Hours Two forward Companies crossed the S.L. and by 1130 hours reported that they had reached their first objective, the line of the 05 Northing. The 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS were also on their first objective soon afterwards and H Hour for the joint assault was fixed as 1150.
    1150 Hours Soon after moving on 4 Company encountered an enemy position in the WOOD at 042232. 1 Company did not encounter any enemy till they reached the thick cover in front of ZEVEN at 033234, and were consequently some way in front of 4 Company. Both enemy positions were however rapidly dealt with and at 1230 the Commanding Officer moved 2 Company up to the ROAD JUNCTION 045235 to be ready to move on to their objective, through 4 Company.
    1245 Hours Just in front of the town 4 Company knocked out a Jagdpanther, but otherwise once through the woods few enemy were found in the town itself and by 1245 both Companies were on their objectives.
    1300 Hours Abortive attempt by battalion of 115 P.G.R. to put in an counter attack. This was soon broken up by artillery fire.
    1430 Hours 2 Company report that they have reached their position without opposition.
    1445 Hours 3 Company ordered to move through 2 Company and on to their objective.
    1530 Hours 3 Company reported in position.
    During the attack and until the evening the enemy put down slow but continuous Artillery fire on the town and the entrances to it, causing some casualties.
    A total of 102 Prisoners of War were taken in the course of the attack. They all came from II Gross Deutschland (i/c 115 P.G.R.) except for the crew of the Jagdpather who came from 7 Bn 115 P.G.R.
    1600 Hours GRENADIER Group report that they are still only partially on their objective, owing to the bridges over the stream in the front fo the town being blown, but the infantry are across and in position guarding the approaches to the town from North and West.
    1600 Hours The Commanding Officer went round to arrange the consolidation of the Battalion. The final lay out was as follows:-
    1 Company front edge of cover area 028232;
    4 Company CEMETERY 028228 to ROAD 029227;
    2 Company astride RAILWAYS 028224 with Platoon on ROAD JUNCTION 033225;
    3 Company originally up to the ROAD at 030214 was pulled back to 030217 so as to be able to link up with 2 Company and concentrate on the South and South East. Battalion H.Q. ROAD JUNCTION 032234.
    To the East of the town the country is very open up to a big wood at 0122 and a rather dominating hill in front of OLDENDORF 0121. Enemy movement was seen in the front edges of the wood and in OLDENDORF during daylight and in the night a staff car with an Officer in it was shot up on the road to the South. Two S.P. also came down the road but withdrew on being shelled.
    2100 Hours Commanding Officer received from Brigade:-
    Main priority task of SECOND ARMY is now to get BREMEN. To speed up this operation XII CORPS will turn West towards BREMEN instead of continuing Northwards.
    The tasks of GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION are as follows:-
    The GRENADIER Group will clear the villages of BRAUEL and OFFENSEN.
    The IRISH Group will clear the village of WISTEDT.
    The COLDSTREAM Group will clear the village of BRUTTENDORS and contact 53 DIVISION who are advancing from the South up to the 90 Easting.
    (2 ) To advance Eastward, the SCOTS/WELSH Group to lead 32 BRIGADE through ZEVEN to TARMSTEDT 8916. On passing through 32 BRIGADE will pick up the COLDSTREAM Group who are to be directed on HEPSTEDT 9019.

    25 April
    0430 Hours Large numbers of tracked vehicles reported moving in the area of OLDENDORF. This may have been the enemy’s Artillery moving back, as during the day there was practically no shelling in ZEVEN.
    0600 Hours Returned to the command of 32 BRIGADE.
    0930 Hours Fighting patrol from 2 Company report that they have reached the point where the railway crosses the stream at 031203 and are observing an enemy position just in front of BRUTTENDORF.
    It had been intended to follow up the patrol with an attack by 2 Company/2 Squadron Group to clear the village, but no artillery ammunition was available to support the attack which was cancelled. The patrol is to remain in position watching the village.
    1245 Hours Typhoons attacked BRUTTENDORF.
    1800 Hours 32 BRIGADE Conference at Divisional H.Q.:-
    Information: To the North the Squadron 2nd Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS and HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT have found PAPENWINKEL and ANDLERINGEP 0432 clear of enemy. To the East and South the enemy are still in position in the big wood 0022 and OLDENDORF and BRUTTENDORF.
    53 DIVISION have reached GYHUM 0415.
    The attack on BREMEN is going well against less opposition than was expected.
    Intention: 32 BRIGADE will clear HEPSTEDT and TARMSTED and establish itself on the high ground East of ZEVEN.
    Method: The SCOTS/WELSH Group will lead. They are to cross the railway crossing in front of ZEVEN at 0600 hours. There will be not move for the COLSTREAM Group till 1000 hours and after that they will wait till called forward. The present COLDSTREAM positions will be taken over by the 1st Battalion GRENADIER GUARDS at 1000 hours.

    26 April
    0830 Hours Battalion 'O' Group:-
    Information: For the future the moves of SECOND ARMY will be as follows:-
    (1 ) XXX CORPS to complete the clearing of BREMEN.
    XII CORPS to continue in present role.
    (2 ) VIII CORPS to cross ELBE and seize LUBECK.
    (3 ) XII CORPS to capture HAMBURG.
    Immediate news: The SCOTS/WELSH Group have reached the 00 Northing and are now in contact with the enemy. No move is likely till 1200 hours.
    On leaving here the Order of March will be:-
    1 Squadron, 2 Company, Joint H.Q., 3 Squadron, 3 Company, 2 Squadron, 4 Company, 1 Company, R.A.P., Support Company, F2 Echelon.
    0900 Hours 2 Company/1 Squadron ordered to move to ROAD JUNCTION 005230 and guard the C.L. at this point.
    1200 Hours The SCOTS/WELSH Group have captured BADENSTEDT after a staged attack. The bridge in the village is blown, but tanks and infantry are pushing on over the railway bridge. The enemy have been using their artillery and shelling has been quite heavy. Mines have also been causing difficulties.
    1700 Hours The bridge in BADENSTEDT wil be completed by 1800 hours, the wheeled vehicles of the SCOTS/WELSH Group will then move on and the COLDSTREAM Group will garrison BADENSTEDT for the night. The SCOTS/WELSH Group will be in OSTERTIMKE.
    The Commanding Officer and Company Commanders went ahead of the Battalion to recce BADENSTEDT at 1730 hours, and at 1930 hours the Battalion moved in and took up positions as follows:-
    1 Company area TRACK JUNCTION 977210;
    4 Company area TRACK JUNCTION 982215;
    3 Company area WOOD 983207;
    Battalion H.Q. MAIN ROAD at 978211.
    The Battalion was followed by the 1st Battalion, the tanks moving into harbour area behind the vilage.
    There is an enemy S.P. gun in action at 995233 and enemy to the North of BADENSTEDT, but no contact has been made with them. The enemy shell BADENSTEDT fairly frequently particularly the area of the bridge.

    27 April
    0830 Hours The Brigade Commander came to Battalion H.Q.:-
    The SCOTS/WELSH Group are to put in an attack on KIRCHTIMKE 9418 at 0915 hours. They are then to send a Company/Squadron Group into WESTERTIMKE 9619 to try and free the British Prisoner of War Camp that is there.
    The IRISH GUARDS Group is under command of 32 BRIGADE and is to pass through BADENSTEDT at 1100 hours and then North up to OSTEREISTEDT 9524.
    The COLDSTREAM Group will be responsible for garrisoning OSTEREISTEDT when the SCOTS/WELSH Group move out. 2 Company/1 Squadron will be relieved by the 21st ANTI-TANK this morning.
    1500 Hours SCOTS/WELSH Group reported to have cleared KIRCHTEMKE 9418 and high ground to the North. IRISH GUARDS Group held up by enemy position just South of OSTEREIDSTEDT 9524.
    1530 Hours 3 Company/2 Squadron Group moved into OSTERTIMKE
    1600 Hours Brigade Commander arrived at Battalion H.Q.:-
    The priority for the Division is now the Northward drive to STADE. 51 DIVISION will take over our present area.
    The SCOTS/WELSH Group are to remain based on KIRCHTIMKE, WESTERTIMKE;
    The IRISH GUARDS Group OSTEREISTEDT; and the
    COLDSTREAM Group are to seize the high ground in the area of WENTEL 9420.
    Tomorrow’s activities will be confined to patrolling forward to cut the TARMSTEDT - HEPSTEDT road.
    The SCOTS/WELSH Group have been as far as the TRACK JUNCTION at 954198. Here they were held up by mines.
    1645 Hours Battalion 'O' Group:-
    Intention: COLDSTREAM Group will seize and occupy the high ground in the area of WENTEL 9420.
    Method: 2 Company/1 Squadron Group have been relieved and will garrison BARDENSTEDT with the F2 Echelon.
    3 Company/2 Squadron will continue to garrison OSTERTIMKE. At 1730 hours the remainder of the Group will move off in the order:-
    3 Squadron, Tac Battalion H.Q., 1 Company, 4 Company.
    The column will clear OSTERTIMKE then debs and move up to the Start Line the North East - South West track 955199. The Carrier Platoon will move off as soon as possible and secure the Start Line the PIONEERS with ROYAL ENGINEERS assistance will clear the mines and then follow up behind the attack clearing the Battalion C.L.
    The attack will be carried out with:-
    Right 1 Company Objective TRACK 943206;
    Tac Battalion H.Q. to WENTEL.
    It is hoped that H Hour will be 1830 but this will be final fixed on arrival.
    1810 Hours The Battalion reached OSTERTIMKE and H Hour was fixed as 1845.
    1845 Hours The attack went in and by 1915 all objective were reported captured. There was no opposition except shelling from S.P. guns. A number of mines were lifted from the C.L.
    Owing to the recent heavy rain the C.L. track soon became impassable except to tracks, and supplies had to be brought up by Carrier convoy system. A new route is being cleared via the road to KIRCHTIMKE.
    During the night there was no attack with the enemy.

    28 April
    1030 Hours The Commanding Officer met the Brigade Commander at the H.Q. of the SCOTS/WELSH Group [in pencil] 1st Battalion.
    1130 Hours Battalion 'O' Group:-
    In order to allow the IRISH GUARDS Group to rejoin 5 BRIGADE for the move North the Battalion lay out is to be altered to:-
    3 Company, 1 Company and 1 Squadron take over OBEREISTEDT from the IRISH GUARDS Group;
    4 Company/3 Squadron remain in WENTEL;
    Battalion H.Q. moves back to BADENSTEDT;
    2 Company remains in BADENSTEDT with F2 Echelon.
    2 Squadron will carry out the patrol to cut the HEMPSTEDT - TARMSTEDT Road and then return to join the H.Q. of 1st Battalion at OSERTIMKE.
    1400 Hours 2 Squadron successfully reached a position by the main TARMSTEDT - HEMPSTEDT road from which they successfully shot up a number of enemy.
    1730 Hours All Battalion moves completed without incident.

    29 April
    1415 Hours Battalion 'O' Group:-
    Information:- 5 BRIGADE have reached BREMERVORDE 9344 but have found the bridge over the River OSTE blown. The HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT meeting slight opposition have reached in the North the general line ASPE 0942, excl. BARGSTEDT 1342, excl. HARSFELD 1741. 32 BRIGADE is to make a non-operational move up to the area HOLLENBECK 1439 WOGLERST 1137. Ultimate role to cut the roads leading into STADE 1457.
    The COLDSTREAM Group will be in the area HOLLENBECK - KAKERBECK 1238.
    The SCOTS/WELSH Group in the area AHRENSWOHLDE 1532. The Battalion will move at 1615 hours.
    1830 Hours COLDSTREAM Group reported complete in new area.
    2130 Hours Brigade 'O' Group:-
    Information: Opposition on all this sector has been very slight. On our right 7 ARMOURED DIVISION have had patrols along the road HOTTENSDORF 2345, RUSCHWEDEL 3141, and met no enemy, but there are some enemy in the woods East of HARSEFELD 1741. HARSFELD is thought to be only very lightly held the main difficulty comes from demolitions and obstructions.
    On our left the GRENADIER Group have liberated the Concentration Camp at SANDBOSTEL 9235. The IRISH GUARDS Group is up to the blown bridge outside BREMEULRDE and in MULSUM 0447.
    Tomorrow the COLDSTREAM Group is to clear BARGSTEDT, HARSFELD and OHRENSEN.
    Owing to demolitions this will initially have to be done by passing a Company/Squadron Group through the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT at ASPE, but ultimately the road to HARSFELD from the South must be cleared.

    30 April
    0830 Hours Battalion ‘O' Group:-
    Information:- During today the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT hope to cut most of the roads to the South West and South of STADE, enemy opposition in all this area being only light.
    Intention:- COLDSTREAM Group will clear the villages of BARGSTEDT, OHRENSEN, and HARSFELD.
    Method:-
    (1 ) 1 Company/1 Squadron Group will pass through the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT at ASPE then advance via BARGSTEDT and OHRENSEN to the bridge North of HARSFELD which is known to be blown. To leave ASPE 1200 hours.
    (2 ) 3 Squadron and Carrier Platoon will leave here at 1030 hours and approaching HARSFELD via GRIEMSHORST 1933 attempt to bounce it from the South West and link up with 1 Company/1 Squadron at the blown bridge.
    (3 ) 2 Company left, 4 Company right, with 3 Squadron in support, will clear up main road into HARSFELD. ROYAL ENGINEERS will go with this party to remove obstructions on the road. Timings dependant upon the results of the ASPE party and the Bounce party. Stonks were arranged on all places along the roads where likely opposition might occur.
    1010 Hours HARSFELD reported clear by HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT. Objective for COLSTREAM Group altered to the area HELMSTE 1549, DIENSTE 1349, GT. FREDENBECK 1049 (also reported clear).
    1100 Hours Battalion 'O' Group:-
    In view of latest information original plan will now be altered as follows:-
    1 Company/1 Squadron will carry on as ordered but after arrival on objective will turn North and preceded by Recce to occupy HELMSTE.
    3 Squadron and Carriers will also carry on as ordered.
    2 Company on the completion of above will clear down the main road into HARSFELD link up with 3 Squadron and return to HOLLENBECK.
    At the same time as the above 4 Company/2 Squadron will move to DIENSTE.
    Arriving back at HOLLENBECK 2 Company/3 Squadron will proceed to FREDENBECK, followed by Battalion H.Q. (destination DIENSTE) followed by 3 Company (destination FREDENBECK), Support Company and F2 Echelon (destination FREDENBECK).
    1100 Hours These moves were all successfully carried out meeting with only very slight resistance. 30 Prisoners of War were captured. The bridge between GT. FREDENBECK and KL. FREDENBECK was found to be blown, necessitating the alteration of 3 Company’s area to the South of DIENSTE.
    2115 Hours Brigade 'O' Group:-
    Only weak opposition and demolition encountered on the Brigade front during the day. 7 ARMOURED DIVISION occupied HORNEBURG 2247.
    The DIENSTE - STADE road is bridgeless. Tomorrow the SCOTS/WELSH Group are to be established on the high ground WIEPEN 1155 HADDORF 1057. Route:- HARSFELD, FREDENBECK, SCHWINGE 0852, WIEPEN 1155. HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIENT to recce towards STADE and the aerodrome to the South of it, also to cut the road South from STADE in the area of GATHENBOURG 1953.
    The COLDSTREAM Group are to take over the bridge at 067504 which is intact at 0700, and at 0600 the bridge at SCHWINGE 095511 which is blown, but which the ROYAL ENGINEERS wil bridge and is to be the main C.L.
     
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    NOMINAL ROLL OF OFFICERS AND WARRANT OFFICERS AND COLOUR SERGEANTS AS AT 30 APRIL 1945

    BATTALION H.Q.
    Lieutenant-Colonel E.R. HILL DSO - Commanding Officer
    Major B.E. LUARD MC - Second-in-Command
    Captain J.T. PAGET - Adjutant
    Captain J. PEREIRA - Intelligence Officer
    Captain & Quartermaster S.B.R. COOPER - Quartermaster
    Captain J.B. INGRAM, ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS - Medical Officer
    Captain Reverend R.H. TOMLINSON, ROYAL ARMY CHAPLAINS DEPARTMENT - Padre
    R.S.M. R.W. SMITH DCM - Regimental Sergeant Major
    R.Q.M.S. E. LOVEJOY - Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant
    Drill Sergeant R. SKELLS
    Drill Sergeant J. COWLEY DCM

    H.Q. COMPANY
    Captain A. GIBBS - Company Commander, H.Q. Company
    Lieutenant H. WHITWELL - M.T.O., H.Q. Company
    Lieutenant A.K. FEILING - Signal Officer, H.Q. Company
    Lieutenant P.R. SPURGIN - Pioneer Officer, H.Q. Company

    NO. 1 COMPANY
    Major D.A. KENNARD MC - Company Commander, 1 Company
    Captain A.B. PEMBERTON - Second-in-Command, 1 Company
    Lieutenant R.C. TREASURE - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    Lieutenant J.G.B. CHESTER - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    Lieutenant E.R. FIFOOT - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    C.S.M. F FARNHILL DCM - Company Sergeant Major, 1 Company
    C.Q.M.S. R. PATERSON - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 1 Company

    NO. 2 COMPANY
    Major The Honourable D.M.G.J. WILLOUGHBY - Company Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant C.N. ACHESON GRAY - Second-in-Command, 2 Company
    Lieutenant Lord BALGONIE - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant The Honourable P.A. STRUTT - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant D.E. PLATER - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    C.S.M. C. EGAN - Company Sergeant Major, 2 Company
    C.Q.M.S. E. HAYES - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 2 Company

    NO. 3 COMPANY
    Captain W.J. STRAKER SMITH - Second-in-Command, 3 Company
    Captain The Earl of PLYMOUTH - Second-in-Command, 3 Company
    Lieutenant The Honourable J.U. KNATCHBULL - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    Lieutenant R.P. LAURIE - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    Lieutenant E.I. WINDSOR-CLIVE - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    C.S.M. S. BERRY - Company Sergeant Major, 3 Company
    C.Q.M.S. A. TOWNSEND, MM - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 3 Company

    NO. 4 COMPANY
    Major J.d’H. HAMILTON - Company Commander, 4 Company
    Captain R.E. PHILIPS, MC - Second-in-Command, 4 Company
    Lieutenant G.H.G. DOGGART - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    Lieutenant D.L. SHELDON - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    Lieutenant T.S. GLAISTER - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    C.S.M. N. REID - Company Sergeant Major, 4 Company

    SUPPORT COMPANY
    Major G.B. MACKEAN - Company Commander, Support Company
    Captain B. BLOWER - Carrier Platoon Commander, Support Company
    Lieutenant M. BENDIX - Anti-Tank Platoon Commander, Support Company
    Lieutenant J.G. PORTER - Second-in-Command Anti-Tank Platoon, Support Company
    Lieutenant B.I.J. BRIDGER - Second-in-Command Carrier Platoon, Support Company
    Lieutenant The Honourable J.J. ORMSBY-GORE - Second-in-Command Mortar Platoon, Support Company
    C.S.M. G. TILLING - Company Sergeant Major, Support Company
    C.Q.M.S. T. THORNTON - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, Support Company

    ON ATTACHMENT
    Lieutenant E. STRAGHAN - Attached H.Q. GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION
    Lieutenant P.H.K. MERRIAM - Officer Commanding A Echelon

    5CG ORB.JPG


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    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    Thursday, 5th April, 1945
    No. 30


    CROSSING THE EMS
    For the last few days events have moved too fast for it to be possible to produce accounts of the liberation of ENSCHEDE or the man other events of our advance, but not that there is a pause, an account of the crossing of the EMS may be of interest to those who have not had the full story.
    Early on Monday morning, after the SCOTS GUARDS had got two Sections across, the bridge over the EMS to LINGEN was blown up and it looked as though a full scale assault crossing would be necessary. However, in the afternoon the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY found an unblown bridge further North and the COLDSTREAM Group were ordered to send out a force to seize it.
    No. 3 Company and No. 3 Squadron from the 1st Battalion, went off to do the job, and looking down on the bridge from a small escarpment some 300 yards from the river, they could see that the bridge was defended and furthermore that on the bridge were some large aerial bombs ready to blow it up.
    The tanks moved up to the escarpment and under cover of fire from the tanks and a stink from the gunners, two platoons were able to get up to the river either side of the bridge. The covering fire from the two platoons and the tanks then enabled to [sic] Company Commander to get onto the bridge and cut the wires connecting the bombs to the demolition set, while the third platoon crossed over and attacked the Germans just across the bridge.
    The tanks had to demolish a road block before they could get across, but within a very short time both the Company and the Squadron were across and the enemy opposition had been completely silenced.
    After a count had been made there were found to have been 42 Prisoners of War (including 2 Officers), 10 Wounded and 40 Dead. Three 88s covering the bridge were captured, together with some 20mm Flak guns and eight bombs found on the bridge.
    The occasion is historic in that this is the first major crossing that the Battalion has ever captured and it is also the first time that the 1st Battalion have used their rockets.
    After the crossing had been seized No. 2 Company and another Squadron moved up to hold the position and early in the morning a Brigade of the 3RD DIVISION passed through and crossed the DORTMUND-EMS Canal without opposition, though the bridge had been blown.
    At the present moment they are moving down the East bank of the Canal towards the town of LINGEN. No. 2 Company who are helping them by mopping up between the canal and the river, report that they have captured 60 Prisoners of War so far.

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    KILLED IN ACTION

    2666445 Guardsman W. ROBINSON - 3 Company

    WOUNDED
    862257 Guardsman H. BULL - 3 Company
    2658007 Sergeant H. DENNY - 3 Company
    2661862 Lance-Sergeant L. DEARDON - 3 Company
    2666587 Guardsman S. BLAKESTON - 3 Company
    2666687 Guardsman C. GARDINER - 3 Company
    11008214 Guardsman J. JUBB - 3 Company
    2666836 Guardsman C. PHILLIPS - 3 Company
    2666840 Guardsman R. WILTSHIRE - 3 Company

    B.B.C. NEWS.
    WESTERN FRONT.
    On the WESTERN FRONT Allied advances press deeper into GERMANY. These are the last known positions from North to South. Canadian Infantry and United Kingdom Tanks battling North into HOLLAND were 25 miles from the ZUIDER ZEE and 50 from E?. Fighter bombers are strafing escape columns. In the North German Plain British tanks and Airborne troops swept beyond OSNABRUCK. The River WESER was reached yesterday. Some reports say that one spearhead of the British 11TH ARMOURED DIVISION crossed the river. The American 5th Armored Division and the British 6TH AIRBORNE DIVISION are also at, or near, the river. OSNABRUCK has been almost cleared by British Commandos. The American 1st and 9th Armies have broken every attempt to escape from the RUHR trap. American 3rd Army tank columns are fanning out in the THURINGIEN plain. The 7th Army has practically cleared WURTSBURG. French tanks stormed KARLSRUHE.

    HEAVIES OUT AGAIN.
    Great forces of British Heavies bombed synthetic oil plants at HAMBURG and MERSEBURG last night. Mosquitoes attacked BERLIN. In daylight yesterday British heavies hammered a German barracks. More than a thousand American heavies again attacked the KIEL U-Boat yards, the port of HAMBURG and airfields in Northern GERMANY.

    RED ARMY NEAR VIENNA.
    The Russians, 5 miles from VIENNA, are ready for the direct assault on the Southern outskirts. Thirty-five miles East, Soviet troops stormed the DANUBE stronghold of BRATISLAVA. All of HUNGARY has been cleared of German troops.

    THE PACIFIC WAR.
    The American invasion of OKINAWA has over-run one sixth of the Island. The Japanese are manning strong defences four miles from the Capital. In the PHILLIPINES another island near LUZON is coming back into American hands. The Pacific war air attacks yesterday included bombing of the HONG KONG docks and targets in FORMOSA as well as the blockade of the CHINA SEA.

    BURMA.
    In BURMA the 15th INDIAN CORPS has cut the retreat of many Japanese units in ARAKAN. The 14TH ARMY gained more ground yesterday South of MANDALAY.

    ITALY.
    British 8TH ARMY men yesterday cleared more of the Lake Comacchio defences.

    BR 30 1.JPG BR 30 2.JPG


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    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    Saturday, 14th April, 1945
    No. 31


    EMS TO BOEN.
    Superficially our progress from the EMS to BOEN has been disappointingly slow, but in view of the enemy situation, it is hardly surprising that we have been unable to achieve a break-through and the import and of last week is not measured in miles but in damage done to the Para Army whose numbers we have been steadily reducing day by day, which is the only way they can be dealt with since there is very little hope that they will ever surrender as a formation. It would have been more spectacular and less costly to swan across GERMANY in the old manner, but there is a job that has to be done one day and we can now claim to have played our share.
    Starting off from a river, after the delays caused by bridging and the time this gives the enemy to get organised, is always difficult and leaving the EMS was no exception. The SCOTS/WELSH Group abandoned the right Centre Line after the first two miles and moved on the left hand one, and, in order to open up as many possibilities ad the roads would allow, we were ordered to continue on their old route from LINGEN to RAMSEL late that afternoon. Thanks to the efforts of No. 1 Company and No. 1 Squadron, by nightfall we had got RAMSEL and BAKUM and next morning were able to start very nearly level with the SCOTS/WELSH Group.
    It was known that the line LENGERICH THUINE would be held and a rapid barrage down the road together with Typhoon attacks on the village was laid on in advance. Surprisingly THUINE was held only by a bewildered Company of 104 P.G.R. and we were masters of the place with comparatively little difficulty. LENGERICH however, proved to be the local point through which all the forces of 7 Para Division were withdrawing, so that instead of peacefully following the SCOTS/WELSH Group through the town while 5 BRIGADE proceeded down the route we opened up at THUINE, we found that the SCOTS/WELSH Group were unable to get LENGERICH and we had to do something about it.
    The 1st Battalion Recce Troop successfully discovered a route round LENGERICH and looking rather apprehensively to our right and left we succeeded in infiltrating our way between the strong point of LENGERICH to the North and another strong point in the woods to the South to emerge on the main road behind LENGERICH, a manoeuvre which appears to have bolted the enemy for it was soon afterward found that LENGERICH had been evacuated and the WELSH GUARDS tanks came down the road to meet us.
    We led off the next day full of hope, but by evening had not gone far. There was a heavy stink on our Start Point, defended road blocks in every village and a number of S.Ps that continued to harass the column from head to tail throughout the day. By midday we were up to BERGE which it was appreciated would be a tough nut to crack and as a preliminary, Typhoons were sent in against it. A Squadron of tanks tried to rush the town from the South but several were knocked out by an Anti-Tank gun and Bazooka men who abounded in every house. No. 4 Company then took on the clearing, and after dealing with an exceptionally stubborn pocket in the North end of BERGE, No. 1 Company passed through them and captured the group of farmsteads about a mile beyond. From here the SCOTS/WELSH Group took the lead and covered the next ten miles up to MENSLAGE, notable for the fact that they and to cross four canals all with their bridges blown, a bad headache for the ROYAL ENGINEERS, and ahead of them the River HASE.
    The HASE was our task and though we got up to it unopposed, within a very short while it became obvious that the rest of the job was not going to be so easy wand peering over the bank at the Germans thickly lining the opposite bank 100 yards away did little to reassure one. Here No. 4 Company pulled off a great coup and captured a bridge, or rather a bit of a bridge, about four miles upstream. A difficult operation but it saved us from boating across and undoubtedly saved a number of lives. Even at this stage it was far from plain sailing, as the defenders of the bridge fought on further back and there was danger that the Battalion would become too deeply involved in getting up to BOEN through the woods to be able to put in an attack, however 3 Company pushed their way through and all was well. No. 3 Company and No. 1 Company then cleared the village and No. 2 Company cleared the river bank, which was probably the most difficult job as despite the fact that their positions were being taken from behind, the numerous enemy we had surveyed from the other side in the morning, turned about and were just as stubborn with the river behind them as in front of them.
    Since we crossed the RHINE we have taken over 700 Prisoners of War, exact details will be given when there is time to work them out.

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    KILLED IN ACTION

    2657441 Lance-Sergeant S. BARKER - 3 Company
    2661545 Guardsman D MILBURN - 4 Company
    2664304 Lance-Corporal D. MILLMAN - 1 Company
    3861848 Lance-Sergeant W. CLITHEROE, MM - 4 Company
    2666986 Guardsman E. NOLDER - 2 Company
    2667122 Guardsman F. MAGUIRE - 3 Company
    14499696 Guardsman J. ROBINSON - 3 Company
    2655227 Guardsman S. COLE - 1 Company
    2666313 Lance-Corproal W. KNELLER - 4 Company
    2656246 Sergeant T. OLIVER - 1 Company
    14498250 Guardsman T. BIRCH - 1 Company
    2665758 Guardsman J. WARBURTON - 2 Company
    2666956 Guardsman D. LEAN - 2 Company
    2667117 Guardsman W. DAVIES - 3 Company
    14420034 Guardsman L. HELLIAR - 1 Company

    DIED OF WOUNDS
    905855 Sergeant G. TODD - H.Q. Company
    2657969 Lance-Corporal G. LORING - 4 Company

    WOUNDED
    Lieutenant J.A.F. NORTHCOTT
    Lieutenant T.A. MATHESON
    2666707 Guardsman B. WHITE (3 Company)
    14695911 Guardsman D. BENNET - 3 Company
    2666810 Guardsman J. HUMPHRIS - 1 Company
    2666394 Guardsman A. STONE - 3 Company
    2654957 Guardsman G. COOPER - H.Q. Company
    2666745 Guardsman F. DOWLING - 4 Company
    2658720 Lance-Sergeant T. BEACH - 4 Company
    2666752 Guardsman H. JOHNSON - 1 Company
    2666876 Guardsman A. RENNEY (3 Company)
    2664013 Guardsman H. AMBLER - 1 Company
    2666814 Guardsman N. MOORE - 3 Company
    2661181 Guardsman L. WILKENSON - 3 Company
    2658387 Guardsman R. HUNTER (4 Company)
    2659116 Guardsman J. MACE - 4 Company
    2666970 Guardsman S. MOSELEY - 4 Company
    14375728 Corporal W. TOWERS - 2 Company
    2659097 Lance-Corporal H. SMITH - 1 Company
    2666459 Guardsman R. CARTER - 2 Company
    14663239 Lance-Corporal A. RANDALL - 2 Company
    2656777 C.Q.M.S. B. AYRES - 2 Company
    26549444 A. RALPH - 1 Company
    14720522 Lance-Corporal H. STEPHENS - 1 Company
    2658513 Lance-Corporal J. PERT - 3 Company
    2666701 Guardsman J. HARE - 1 Company
    1661863 Sergeant C. HANDLEY - 3 Company
    2659796 Guardsman G. THOMPSON - 3 Company
    2666726 Guardsman N. GARNESS - 3 Company
    2664662 Lance-Sergeant A. SIMMONS - 1 Company
    2666663 Guardsman E. BENNETT - 4 Company
    2661351 Lance-Corporal F. RALPH - Support Company
    2658253 Guardsman S. HORMAN - H.Q. Company
    2666912 Guardsman K. PRICE - 2 Company
    2666848 Guardsman K. RIDDLE - 3 Company
    2664442 Lance-Corporal J. ROYAL - 3 Company
    2667659 Guardsman J. JACQUES - 4 Company
    2663054 Lance-Corporal F. CREIGHTON - 3 Company
    2665910 Guardsman F. DARTON - 1 Company
    2658123 Guardsman W. SMITH - 1 Company
    2667073 Guardsman S. HAWLEY - 2 Company
    2659000 Sergeant F. BLADES - 1 Company
    2661985 Lance-Corporal G. CLOUGH - 1 Company
    2666829 Guardsman D. FENNELL - 1 Company
    2661186 Guardsman G. CLEMONS - 3 Company

    WOUNDED, REMAINING AT DUTY.
    2658775 Guardsman D. LANE - 2 Company
    2656906 Lance-Sergeant C. HARRIS - 3 Company
    2663988 Guardsman E. EWRY - H.Q. Company
    2666668 Guardsman J. NORMAN - 1 Company
    2659154 Lance-Sergeant H. EGGLESTONE - 1 Company


    BR 31 1.JPG BR 31 2.JPG


    [hr]


    Field Returns

    5CG AprFR1.JPG 5CG AprFR2.JPG 5CG AprFR3.JPG 5CG AprFR4.JPG 5CG AprFR5.JPG 5CG AprFR6.JPG 5CG AprFR7.JPG 5CG AprFR8.JPG 5CG AprFR9.JPG 5CG AprFR10.JPG 5CG AprFR11.JPG
     
  14. dbf

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    1 May 1945
    At first light 3 Company sent a Platoon/Troop Group to the bridge site South of SWINGE at 095511 to protect it while the ROYAL ENGINEERS do the bridging. A Platoon-Troop Group sent to an existing bridge at 067503 was unable to accomplish its task, as one of the tanks was blown up on a sea mine leaving the road cratered and impassable.
    During the morning the SCOTS/WELSH Group was established on the high ground North West of STADE, but were unable to get into the town. Meanwhile the town surrendered to the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT, and in order to get troops into the town as soon as possible 1 Company/Squadron Group was ordered to follow up and take over the bridge in the middle of the town. A guide from the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT was necessary as all the bridges on the roads in from the South were blown, and the only route in, is a cross-country one.
    The Company were in position by 1530 hours, and the town was put under the control of the Military Government etc without incident or interference.
    1700 Hours The SCOTS/WELSH Group entered the town from the North, and 1 Company returned to the Battalion at DIENSTE.

    2 May
    1830 Hours Battalion ‘O' Group:-
    Information: Except for small forces, the bulk of the German troops have now withdrawn behind the River OSTE. One small Group is still holding out in HIMMELPFORTEN 0359 where the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT have been keeping a watch on them. The GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION’s task is to complete mopping up to the line of the river.
    Intention: The COLDSTREAM Group will clear HIMMELPFORTEN 0359.
    Method: In view of the likelihood of the enemy withdrawing tonight, a HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT patrol will investigate HIMMELPFORTEN at first light tomorrow and in the event of it being still held, the Group will leave here at 0900 hours.
    On reaching DUDENBUTTEL Companies will debus and move up to the Start Line, the track crossing the main road at 057572.
    The attack will be carried out with two Companies forward:- 2 Company right on the main road, objective North and North West of village, 4 Company left of the main objective South and East of village; 3 Company will follow up ready to be passed through to seize the bridge at 038580. 1 Company will remain in DUDENBUTTEL to protect the transport. The attack will be supported by 3 Squadron. There will be 2 Field Batteries, 1 Medium Regiment and the Heavy Mortar Platoon for the fire plan.

    3 May
    0730 Hours HIMMELPFORTEN reported clear of enemy. Move of COLDSTREAM Group cancelled.
    1030 Hours The Battalion was ordered to sent a Company/Squadron Group to occupy HIMMELPFORTEN. This was carried out by 4 Company and 3 Squadron.
    1800 Hours Platoon/Troop patrol reported BURWEG 0260 clear of enemy, and the railway bridge across the river at 009609 blown.
    2100 Hours At first light the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT will go out to look at the bridge at 00519. If it is blown the Battalion is to plan an assault crossing to be carried out on the 5th.

    4 May
    0730 Hours HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT report the bridge at 005619 is damaged but can be crossed.
    1130 Hours No. 4 Company/3 Squadron Group moved off to cross the river and occupy HECHTHAUSEN 9961.
    The road at 008611 had been mined with sea mines, one of which blew up completely destroying a gunner tank, two or more were later detected and removed, but as a result of the crater made by the first mine the tanks were unable to move up into the village, which was occupied by No. 4 Company.
    The enemy made no aggressive moves during the time that the Company was in the village though several came in and surrendered.
    2300 Hours Message received from Brigade:-
    “Germans surrendered unconditionally at 1820 hours 4 May. Hostilities on all sectors Army front will cease at 0800 hours today. No, repeat NO, advance beyond present front line without orders from this H.Q.”

    5 May
    0900 Hours No. 4 Company left HECHTHAUSEN and returned to the Battalion area at DIENSTE.

    6 May
    -

    7 May
    Brigade Conference:-
    The task of the GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION is to put into force Operation ECLIPSE.
    32 BRIGADE area is bounded on the West by the sea, and on the East by Brigade area. Within the Brigade area, the SCOTS/WELSH Group will occupy CUXHAVEN and see to the disarmament of the CUXHAVEN Garrison, and the COLDSTREAM Group will supervise the disarmament of 7 Para Division.
    7 Para Division is at present concentrated in the area ALTENWALDE 6181; OXSTEDT 5778; MIDLUM 5771. They have been given orders to make a further concentration on to the airfield 6075 and it is hoped this will be completed by tonight.
    There are a number of arms and food dumps in the area. These are at present being guarded by the Germans till the time when we take over from them.
    Initially the COLDSTREAM Group will make a tactical move to the high ground North of the Aerodrome, here they will take up a position dominating the aerodrom. As 7 Para Division complete their move the aerodrome will be turned into a Prisoner of War Cage to be guarded by the COLDSTREAM Group.
    Other German units have been given concentration areas in local villages but they will not be guarded.
    The head of the Brigade column with the SCOTS/WELSH Group in the lead will move off at 0900 hours. The Germans have guaranteed the main C.L. free of mines, and a German staff officer will guide the column.
    2100 Hours The Battalion took up its position North of the aerodrome as follows:-
    3 Company guards a sea mine dump at 5979;
    1 Company guards an M.T. and gun park at 608798;
    4 Company is at road and railway crossing 596763;
    2 Company is at 610763. These two Companies will form the guard on the final Prisoner of War cage area, which is the area between the two Companies and South to 605757.
    Battalion H.Q. is in a large barracks at 605774.
    It was found that 7 Para Division had not yet completed their final concentration and were still in the neighbouring village. They will however have completed their move by 1400 hours tomorrow.

    8 May
    The Commanding Officer gave out orders to a Staff Officer of 7 Para Division as to the bounds of their area and various other regulations. It was also arranged that in the absence of the Division Commander the senior Regiment Commander would report to the Commanding Officer at 1600 hours to take him round the camp and see that all the units of the Division were present. He then arranged the posts that are to be manned for guarding the aerodrome.
    1600 Hours The final concentration of 7 Para Division was completed and the Commanding Officer inspected the results. The Artillery, transport and equipment of the Division have been formed into a dump at 609755 which is guarded by No. 1 Company. All the Officers, except a staff or ten for the running of the Camp, have been separated and moved up to a building in the Battalion H.Q. Barracks. A list of the personnel and equipment involved is attached as an Appendix.
    In general all German units receive their orders from Corps EMMS who receive their orders from XXX CORPS. For the detailed running of the camp however an officer has been appointed by 32 GUARDS BRIGADE, so that the Battalion is only responsible for guarding the cage and the various dumps in this area.

    9 - 19 May
    During this period the main activities have been as follows:-
    (1 ) Company re-organisation and administration. 14th and 15th the Commanding Officer inspected all Companies.
    (2 ) Ammunition and small arms dumps moved to central dump in 3 Company area
    (3 ) Move of 7 Para Division to area of STADE for screening. This was completed by the 12th leaving only 1 Para Army Signals who do not require guarding. No. 2 Company was moved up to the Barracks. The equipment guarded by Nos. 1 and 3 Companies has been taken over by the SCOTS/WELSH Group and the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT so that the Companies were able to move to more comfortable quarters at 595774.
    (4 ) Company searches of the Battalion area to check up on all the civilian restrictions and see that no unauthorised people are using vehicles or moving out of the area, also to round up any stragglers from the German Army, and to discover any unreported arms or equipment.
    (5 ) Organisation of entertainment, in particular visits to HELIGOLAND, and bathing.

    19 May
    0600 Hours The Battalion via HOLSSEL 5865, BREMERVORDE 9344, ZEVEN 0223, ROTENBURG 1102 to WESTERVESEDE 2107.
    The Battalion area is made up of the following villages:-
    FINTEL 2910 (2 and 3 Companies)
    VAHLDE 2611 (4 Company)
    WESTERVESEDE 2107 (Battalion H.Q.)
    OSTERVESEDE 2308 (Support Company)
    HEMSLINGEN 2500 - shelled by Neberwerfers when the Battalion was last there and no good for billets.
    The Battalion's role whilst in the area is to collect in all the equipment and ammunition still lying about the countryside, and to carry out Security checks so as to enforce the various rules and regulations of Military Government.

    20 May
    The Commanding Officer left for LONDON where he his going to discuss matters of future policy with Regimental Headquarters. Major B.E. LUARD, M.C., took over command of the Battalion.
    Guard of Honour for the Opening of the British Exhibition in PARIS left under command of Major G.B. MACKEAN. They will be away until the 1st June. Details of the visit will be given with next month’s War Diary.

    21 - 25 May
    -

    26 May
    Commanding Officers Conference.
    The following points as to the future of GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION have now been arranged:-
    (1 ) Between the 16 - 22 June the Division will leave this area and move to the area AACHEN - COLOGNE - BONN. It will leave XXX CORPS and come under command of I CORPS.
    (2 ) The Division establishment will be changed to that of an Occupational Division i.e. all tanks, Artillery, will be handed in and the Division reorganised into four Brigades as follows:-
    5 BRIGADE, 6 BRIGADE, 32 BRIGADE (5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS, 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS, 2nd Battalion WELSH GUARDS, M.G. Company), ROYAL ARTILLERY BRIGADE.

    27 - 28 May
    -

    29 May
    Party of Officers, N.C.Os. and Other Ranks went to VERDEN to hear a Farewell Address by the Corps Commander.

    30 May
    -
     
  15. dbf

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    May Appendices

    [hr]

    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 32
    Tuesday, 1st May, 1945

    A RESUME OF EVENTS.
    Looking at the war as a whole it is hard to find any reason why it continues, except the intense stupidity of the German Nation, and the fear that if they surrender reprisals will be taken against their families.
    The defence of the North of GERMANY, and in particular between the WESER and the ELBE was arranged personally by HIMMLER, and from the news it appears that he is himself either in DENMARK or along the northern coast and probably still in control of a more or less coherent command.
    In so far as there is a purpose in the Germans still holding out, our battles are still the battle for BREMEN and HAMBURG, as until the ground between the ELBE and the WESER has been mopped up and the two estuaries are in our control, we cannot use either of these ports, both of which are of vital importance to us.
    Our part in the operation has been mainly a series of town storming battles, and the catalogue of names is by now too long to go into in detail, NEUNKIRCHEN, then down on to the other centre line to capture the troublesome VISSELHOVEDE, up our own centre line once more, and SCHESSEL was added to the list, No. 1 Company and the tanks being led in by a willing Burgomaster. ROTTENBURG despite a lot of negotiations and a shower of propaganda, announced the they would hold on to the last man and last round. Fortunately the troops were not in agreement with this and over 700 Prisoners of War were captured which so upset the German Commander (also captured) that he committed suicide.
    After ROTENBURG came ZEVEN which was perhaps the toughest of them, our troubles being added to by the fact that the enemy had a number of guns and apparently ample ammunition for its defence. The 1st Battalion captured a Mortar Bomb factory nearby.
    Pushing West from ZEVEN we were only in the lead when we captured WENTEL, which was unopposed except for shelling, and in this sector the enemy have now entered behind the network of canals and waterways called the OSTE-HAMME Canal, which it is fortunately someone else’s job to tackle.
    We have now done a big switch-over to the other side of things. Yesterday’s advance brought us to within five miles of STADE on the ELBER, which is of importance as there is one of the few remaining ferry systems across the river still in action here. The roads are now all cut, but news from the other Group suggest that the town is held.
    It is becoming increasingly difficult to catalogue the kinds and number of Prisoners of War that we are not getting in, but our total since crossing the WESER is over500 and if wounded are counted as well as another 2,000 can be added, the inmates of the big hospitals in ROTENBURG and SCHEESSEL. Russians, Poles, Dutch, French, and innumerable other Prisoners of War and slave workers liberated runs to wholly astronomical figures that it is hard even to guess at. The GRENADIER Group who have liberated the concentration camp at SANDBOSTEL found 35,000 peole there, most of them starving and with a Typhus epidemic.

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    Since our last issue the following casualties have been suffered:-
    KILLED IN ACTION
    2660094 Guardsman G. THACKER - 4 Company
    6015083 Guardsman G. TRUNDLE - 2 Company
    2663030 Lance-Corporal N. CLIFTON - 2 Company
    2667381 Guardsman P. SHORTALL - 1 Company
    2667271 Guardsman G. ROBINSON - 3 Company
    2663719 Guardsman L. GOLDSWORTHY - 1 Company
    2663466 Lance-Corporal E. JACKSON - 4 Company
    2666656 Guardsman A. POOLE - 3 Company
    2667086 Guardsman L. PAGE - 2 Company
    4698303 Lance-Corporal J. BUCKINGHAM - 2 Company
    2666750 Guardsman B. WILKINS - 2 Company
    2658387 Guardsman R. HUNTER (4 Company)
    14681109 Lance-Corporal G. BROWN - 4 Company
    5735196 Guardsman H. DYER - 4 Company
    2662985 Lance-Corporal G. CLOUGH - 1 Company
    2666967 Guardsman H. BEDFORD - 3 Company

    WOUNDED
    2665729 Lance-Sergeant G. SWINDLEHURST - 2 Company
    14672798 Guardsman D. SUTTON - 3 Company
    2665686 Lance-Corporal E. MARSH - 3 Company
    2660309 Sergeant W. CLARKE - 3 Company
    2666773 Guardsman E. DYSON - Support Company
    14683998 Guardsman R. EASTERBY - 2 Company
    2666940 Guardsman N. DAVISON - 4 Company
    2667240 Guardsman R. GEAR - 2 Company
    2666303 Lance-Sergeant K. BLAKE - 3 Company
    14497947 Guardsman G. GALES - 3 Company
    2663993 Lance-Sergeant D. FRENCH - 1 Company
    2666926 Guardsman J. BENBURY - 1 Company
    2666786 Guardsman H. JACKSON - 2 Company
    805294 Lance-Sergeant J. KELLY - 3 Company
    2667219 Guardsman J. BEECH - 3 Company
    2666890 Guardsman G. NICOL - 3 Company
    2665157 Guardsman H. GIBSON - 4 Company
    2663973 Lance-Corporal H. HUNT - Support Company
    2667013 Guardsman T. KEARSLEY - 1 Company
    2666875 Guardsman T. MOFFAT - 1 Company
    2665957 Guardsman S. HARVEY - 1 Company
    2653892 Guardsman A. WORTHINGTON - 1 Company
    2665401 Lance-Corporal S. TAME - 1 Company
    2667044 Guardsman H. BOOKER - 3 Company
    2658019 Lance-Corporal G. JUBY - 4 Company
    14572702 Guardsman D. HOLMES - 4 Company
    2666250 Guardsman D. MILLER - H.Q. Company
    2665171 Guardsman K. TOWSE - H.Q. Company
    2666914 Guardsman R. DELBRIDGE - H.Q. Company
    2658029 Lance-Corporal J. HARRIS - H.Q. Company
    2663679 Guardsman G. BAXTER - Support Company
    2667101 Guardsman J. WILSON - 3 Company
    2667554 Guardsman F. STRAWFORD - 2 Company

    3248641 Corporal A. HOBSON - 3 Company
    2662575 Lance-Sergeant J. MARTIN - 3 Company
    14669983 Guardsman J. GRUNDY - 3 Company
    2667886 Guardsman E. CATLIN - 3 Company
    2663478 Lance-Corporal R. GILBERT - 2 Company
    2659033 Lance-Sergeant A. DARBYSHIRE - 4 Company
    2661841 Sergeant W. ORTON - 4 Company
    2667244 Guardsman F. HOUNSOME - 2 Company
    2657215 Lance-Sergeant B. THEWLIS - 3 Company
    2657817 Lance-Corporal D. ADAMS (3 Company)
    2666854 Guardsman D. WARD - 3 Company
    2659297 Guardsman A. DIXON - 1 Company
    2666955 Guardsman C. HACKETT - 1 Company
    2667243 Guardsman S. HOOPER - 2 Company
    2661479 Guardsman A. LAING - 3 Company
    2666748 Guardsman G. SANDERSON - 3 Company
    2666679 Guardsman M. KITE - 4 Company
    2664043 Guardsman P. O’GRADY - 4 Company
    2666397 Guardsman A. FOX - 1 Company
    2666575 Guardsman R. NORRIS - 1 Company
    2667173 Guardsman R. GARDINER - 1 Company
    2664967 Guardsman W. CODD - 1 Company
    2666884 Guardsman S. GLODHILL - 1 Company
    14413697 Guardsman H. BATES - 3 Company
    2659795 Guardsman T. UNDERHILL - 4 Company
    14721500 Guardsman A. MEE - 4 Company
    2665924 Guardsman A. IBBETSON - H.Q. Company
    2663609 Guardsman G. BYNG - H.Q. Company
    5621876 Guardsman G. IRVINGS - H.Q. Company
    823620 Guardsman H. CUDMERE - 2 Company
    2666696 Guardsman L. WHITTAKER - 3 Company
    14716502 Guardsman R. TOPHAM - 3 Company
    2659941 Lance-Sergeant J. RIBCHESTER - Support Company

    PRISONERS OF WAR, RELEASED
    Information has been received that the undermentioned ex-prisoners of war have disembarked in the U.K.
    2662119 Lance-Sergeant N. HOLDSHIP (3 Company)
    14686589 Guardsman R. COPPIN (3 Company)
    2658214 Lance-Corporal J. BOULTON (3 Company)



    Brussels Sprout
    P1400183.JPG


    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    THE BRUSSELS SPROUT
    NO. 33
    Friday, 11th May 1945.

    THE BATTALION'S LAST ACTION.
    On the 4th May No. 4 Company crossed the River OSTE and entered the village of HECHTHAUSE without opposition - through a gunner tank was blown up on a sea mine, and the enemy had attempted unsuccessfully to blow up the bridge with depth charges, and this was the Battalion’s last act of war.
    Early the next morning the following message was received:-
    “Germans surrendered unconditionally at 1820 hours 4 May. Hostilities on all sectors Army front will cease at 0800 hours today. No, repeat NO, advance beyond present front line without orders from this H.Q.”
    And having brought events up to the end of the war in EUROPE, “The Brussels Sprout” is now left with nothing to do but to say goodbye, and offer as a final feature the attached summary from the War Diary of all the major moves and battles since the Battalion arrived in NORMANDY.

    8TH ARMY LINK UP WITH BRUSSELS.
    Red Army troops in CZECHOSLOVAKIA are attacking German groups still ignoring the general surrender. German planes again attacked a Concentration Camp.
    British 8th Army troops have linked up with the Russians in AUSTRIA WEST of GRAZ.
    Dr. HENES returned to PRAGUE yesterday. The notorious Sudeten leader HENLEIN surrendered to the Americans.

    CHANNEL ISLANDS FREED.
    The CHANNEL ISLANDS were freed early on Wednesday morning when a small party of British troops land on GUERNSEY after the Germans had signed unconditional surrender terms aboard the British destroyer ‘Bulldog’.
    As our men went ashore every building flew the Union Jack and there were scenes of tremendous enthusiasm.

    GERMAN FLEET SURRENDERING.
    The Germans in DENMARK expect to get most of their troops out within for weeks. Most of what is left of the German fleet has surrendered to the ROYAL NAVY in COPENHAGEN Harbour. Five ‘U’ Boats surrendered in British waters yesterday. Six more have been spotted flying surrender flags.

    BATTALION CASUALTIES.
    Since the last issue the following casualties have been suffered by the Battalion.

    WOUNDED
    2667806 Guardsman J. BROWN (4 Company), now rejoined unit.
    2667870 Guardsman P. PREECE (4 Company)
    DIED OF WOUNDS
    2653973 Lance Corporal H. HUNT (Support Company)

    The undermentioned ‘Died of Wounds’ and were not ‘Killed in Action’ as stated in the last issue:-
    2662935 Lance-Corporal G. CLOUGH (1 Company)
    266759 Guardsman B. WILKINS (2 Conpany)
    2658387 Guardsman R. HUNTER (4 Company)
    2667271 Guardsman G. ROBINSON (3 Company)


    Brussels Sprout
    P1400187.JPG P1400188.JPG


    [hr]


    SUMMARY FROM BATTALION WAR DIARY
    NORMANDY TO VICTORY

    23 June 1944 Arrived in NORMANDY. Concentration area SOUTH WEST of BAYEUX.
    28 June 1944 - 11 July 1944 Took over defensive position at ST. MANVIEUX prior to and during Canadian attack on CAEN.
    11 July 1944 - 17 July 1944 Back in rest area EAST of BAYEUX.
    18 July 1944 - 19 July 1944 Took part in Operation GOODWOOD to enlarge the bridgehead in front of newly captured CAEN. Battalion took over position in area of CAGNY from Armoured Brigade.
    20 July 1944 - 23 July 1944 Battalion attacked and captured FRENOUVILLE.
    23 July 1944 - 28 July 1944 Semi rest area at GIBBERVILLE. Decoy to German Panzer Divisions, and at notice to take part in advance towards BRETTEVILLE SUR LAIZE. GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISINON’s part cancelled.
    28 July 1944 - 31 July 1944 Back to rest area in BAYEUX area.
    31 July 1944 Took up advance of GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION with tanks of 2nd Armoured Battalion IRISH GUARDS from ST. MARTIN to Pt. 204.
    1 August 1944 - 5 August 1944 Advance continued via ST. CHARLES DE PERCY to LA MARVINDIERE.
    6 August 1944 - 9 August 1944 Attack from LA MARVINDIERE to LE BUSQ.
    9 August 1944 - 10 August 1944 Move to area Pt. 218.
    11 August 1944 - 12 August 1944 Attack and capture CHENEDOLLE and cut VIRE - VASSY road.
    12 August 1944 - 16 August 1944 Withdrawn back to position by BAS PERRIER: from here the enemy withdrew from us via the FALAISE pocket.
    16 August 1944 - 24 August 1944 Rest area MAISONCELLES.
    24 August 1944 - 29 August 1944 Move up to further rest are CONDE SURE NOIREAU.
    29 August 1944 Move to area of LAIGLE and stage the night en route for advance to BRUSSELS.
    30 August 1944 Cross River SEINE at VERNON then after short halt reach GISORS at night fall (GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION now in the lead).
    31 August 1944 Reach the SOMME at CORBIE. Battalion in position guarding bridges.
    1 September 1944 With 1st Armoured Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS advanced and captured ARRAS, then on to high ground to NORTH. 3 Company under command 2nd Armoured Battalion IRISH GAURDS go on to DOUAI.
    2 September 1944 Move up to behind DOUAI.
    3 September 1944 Advance to BRUSSELS following GRENADIER GUARDS Group.
    4 September 1944 - 5 September 1944 Took up position guarding NORTH WEST of BRUSSELS.
    6 September 1944 - 7 September 1944 Advance to the ALBERT CANAL. Own Centre Line abandoned. Crossing made at BEERINGEN. COLDSTREAM GUARDS Group move to position SOUTH WEST of DIEST.
    8 September 1944 - 9 September 1944 Battalion expanding bridgehead from BEERINGEN: fought battles BEVERLOO and HEPPEN just WEST of BOURG LEOPOLD.
    9 September 1944 - 10 September 1944 Advance up to ESCAUT CANAL.
    12 September 1944 - 15 September 1944 Took over the bridgehead and advanced to LA COLONIE.
    16 September 1944 - 17 September 1944 Back to rest area behind the canal at LINDEL then at NEERPELT.
    18 September 1944 Advance to EINDHOVEN. Harboured area of VALKENSWAARD.
    19 September 1944 Leading Group of GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION reached NIJMEGEN. Battalion to area WEST of MAAS - WAAL Canal.
    20 September 1944 - 21 September 1944 In counter attack role with 83 U.S. AIRBORNE DIVISION.
    22 September 1944 - 25 September 1944 Back down C.L. to clare same of enemy. Battle at VOKEL.
    25 September 1944 - 30 September 1944 Move to join 2 Company in OSS. Remainder of Battalion astride GRAVE - HEESCH road.
    1 October 1944 - 2 October 1944 Back under command 82 U.S AIRBORNE DIVISION, area of MOOK.
    2 October 1944 - 6 October 1944 Took over on the island from 3rd Battalion IRISH GUARDS in area EAST of ELST, around the hamlet of AAM.
    7 October 1944 9 October 1944 To rest area WEST of MAAS - WAAL Canal.
    10 October 1944 - 3 November 1944 To rest area EAST of MAAS - WAAL Canal at HATERT.
    4 November 1944 - 11 November 1944 Battalion to defensive position in MAAS pocket, are of LEUNE. Here relieved Motor Battalion of 11th ARMOURED for a rest.
    11 November 1944 - 20 December 1944 GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION take over SITTARD sector from U.S. Battalion in area of WEHR.
    21 December 1944 German ARDENNES offensive. Move to area OPHEYLISSEM.
    25 December 1944 - 27 December 1944 Take over protection of bridges at NAMUR.
    27 December 1944 - 7 February 1945 Back to OPHEYLISSEM for long rest.
    7 February 1945 - 10 February 1945 To HAAREN, concentration area for Operation VERITABLE.
    11 February 1945 - 12 February 1945 Closing up to battle, move to NIJMEGEN.
    13 February 1945 Closing up to battle, move to GROESBEEK.
    14 February 1945 - 15 February 1945 Under command 51 DIVISION attack to enlarge GENNEP bridgehead over the NIERS.
    16 February 1945 - 21 February 1945 Second attack. Captured MULL.
    22 February 1945 Rest area at HOMMERSUM.
    23 February 1945 - 3 March 1945 Took over defensive position NORTH EAST of GOCH at S??? prior to and during Canadian advance to UDEM.
    4 March 1945 Attacked through GRENADIER GUARDS to capture METZEKATH.
    9 March 1945 Attacked through 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARDS to smash WESEL BRIDGEHEAD.
    10 March 1945 - 12 March 1945 Temporary rest area at MEXEKATH.
    12 March 1945 - 28 March 1945 Rest are at MOOK.
    29 March 1945 Move to concentration area for Operation PLUNDER NORTH EAST of UDEM.
    30 March 1945 Crossed the RHINE at REES and to harbour area DINZPERLOO.
    31 March 1945 COLDSTREAM GUARDS Group start C.L. to left and reach NEEDE.
    1 April 1945 COLDSTREAM GUARS Group cross TWENTE Canal and clear ENSCHEDE.
    2 April 1945 - 4 April 1945 Behind SCOTS GUARDS/WELSH GUARDS Group near DENEKAMP.
    3 April 1945 - 5 April 1945 Follow SCOTS GUARDS/WELSH GUARDS Group to MITTLELOHNE, WEST of River EMMS. 3 Company capture bridge over the EMMS. Operations between river and canal.
    6 April 1945 Advanced from LINGEN to captured REMSEL and BACOUM.
    7 April 1945 Continued advance capturing HANDRUPT and outflanking LENGERICH.
    8 April 1944 Attacked and captured BERGE.
    11 April 1945 Battle to cross River HASE and capture BOEN.
    13 April 1945 Lead to VESTRUPT.
    14 April 1945 - 17 April 1945 Cleared rest area and settled in at EMSTEK.
    17 April 1945 Move across WESER and ALLER to concentration area at EILSTORF.
    18 April 1945 - 19 April 1945 Captured NEUNEKIRPCHEN and VISSELHEVODE also numerous small villages.
    20 April 1945 SCHESSEL surrenders to COLDSTREAM GUARDS Group.
    22 April 1945 Joint COLDSTREAM GUARDS/SCOTS GUARDS attack captures ROTTENBURG.
    24 April 1945 Joint COLDSTREAM GUARDS/GRENADIER GUARDS attack captures ZEVEN.
    26 April 1945 - 27 April 1945 COLDSTREAM GUARDS Group move to BADENSTEDT then captured WENTEL.
    29 April 1945 Move HOLLENBECK.
    30 April 1945 Advance to DIENSTE having cleared HARSFELD.
    1 May 1945 1 Company into surrendered STADE.
    3 May 1945 4 Company to HIMMELPFORTEN.
    4 May 1945 Last act of war. 4 Company across OSTE Canal and to HECHTHAUSEN.
    7 May 1945 Move to airfield SOUTH of CUXHAVEN to incarcerate 7 Para Division.
    8 May 1945 V.E. DAY.


    Battalion Timeline for NWE
    P1400184.JPG P1400185.JPG P1400186.JPG


    [hr]

    APPENDIX

    5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, British Liberation Army
    11th May 1945

    Now that your No. 3 Platoon has left us possibly for the last time, we all want to let you know how ver highly we have valued our association with your Regiment. I believe this platoon of yours started being attached to us on training in ENGLAND and it has certainly been our companion in nearly every battle ever since we landed and during all the defensive positions we have been in.

    First under Fred BROUGH, till he was wounded, and then under Harry MARSH, the Platoon has become our real friends and will long be remembered with affection by all ranks of our Support Company.

    I trust you will be so good to convey to all ranks of No. 3 Platoon how this Battalion has appreciated the association and we wish them all the best of luck for the future.

    Signed
    Lieutenant-Colonel E.R. HILL
    Commanding 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS

    Major B.Van der Gucht,
    ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS,
    H.Q., 32 GUARDS BRIGADE


    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    H.Q. No. 1 Independent M.G. Company, NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS
    British Liberation Army
    12th May 1945

    Dear Colonel,
    Thank you so much for your letter about my 3 Platoon. It was much appreciated.

    The Platoon have the happiest memories of their association with your Battalion, and have asked me to thank you and all ranks for the kindness shown to them during the campaign.

    Yours sincerely,
    B.Van der Gucht, Major
    Commanding No. 1 Independent M.G. Company NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS

    [Handwritten noted added:-]
    Pass for Support Company to read & return. Then both letters to war diary.



    Correspondence to/from NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS
    P1400189.JPG P1400190.JPG


    [hr]


    APPENDIX

    STRENGTH AND ARMS OF 7 PARA DIVISION
    8th May 1945

    Einheit / Offs. / Beamte / Uffs. / Mannsch. / Gesamt.
    Fallsch.Jg.Rgt. 19 / 27 / - / 374 / 595 / 996
    Fallsch.Jg.Rgt. 20 / 37 / - / 381 / 997 / 1415
    Art.Rgt. 7 / 37 / 6 / 380 / 604 / 1027
    Pz.Jg.Abt. 7 / 8 / - / 51 / 123 / 182
    Flak-Abt. 7 / 9 / 3 / 125 / 278 / 415
    St.Gesch.Brig. 12 / 14 / - / 117 / 191 / 322
    Ln.-Abt. 7 / 10 / - / 84 /184 / 278
    Aufkl.Abt. 12 / 12 / - / 205 / 261 / 478
    Ib. / 5 / - / 20 / 21 / 46
    Kodina 7 / 17 / - / 328 / 511 / 856
    Kdt.Stabs.-Qu. enschl. Fuhrungs-Abt. / 9 / 2 / 41 / 51/ 103
    Felgend.Trupp+ / 1 / - / 27 / 21 / 49
    Radfahr-Komp. / 2 / - / 27 / 32 / 61
    Div.Kradmeldezug / - / - / 11 / 6 / 17
    Pi.Batl. 7 Tross und le Pi.Kal. / 3 / - / 38 / 84 / 125
    Div.-Intendant / 5 / - / 20 / 24 / 49
    INSGESAMT / 196 / 11 / 2229 / 3983 / 6419

    Rifles - 2643
    Pistols - 1023
    Mach. Pistols - 409
    LMGs - 301
    8cm Mors - 19
    8cm Mors (R) - 3
    Bazookas - 1241
    Verey Pistols - 77
    Verey Pistols with rifled barrels - 10
    Rifle Grenades - 33
    Automatic rifles - 51
    12cm Mors - 5
    3.7 A/Tk - 1
    7.5 gun hows - 6
    10.5cm gun - 9
    15cm guns - 8
    7.62 guns - 1
    10cm guns - 3
    7.5 A/Tk - 2
    7.5 SP A/Tk - 1
    Panzerschreck - 13
    Twin LMGs - 2
    8.8cm Flak - 2
    2cm Flak - 4
    3.7 Flak - 3
    2cm Vierling - 2
    2cm Twin - 2
    MG Vierling - 2
    MG 3 barrelled - 2
    5cm Mors - 4
    7.5 SP (Assault guns) - 8


    Strength and Arms of German 7 Para Division as at 8 May 1945
    P1400191.JPG


    [hr]

    Field Returns
    P1400192.JPG P1400193.JPG P1400194.JPG P1400195.JPG P1400196.JPG P1400197.JPG P1400198.JPG P1400199.JPG P1400200.JPG P1400201.JPG
     
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    June 1945
    During the first week all self demobilised Wehrmacht men in the Battalion area of responsibility were called in, and taken to STADE for screening. Under Operation BARLEYCORN 200 demobilised farmers were returned to the area. Road checks were carried out leading to a number of arrests. Illicit travel on the roads, still very considerable, and many of the people detained had already travelled hundreds of miles.
    The Battalion area was searched for enemy ammunition and equipment. The total tonnage that the Companies moved to the central Brigade dump was very large; several tons worth of small arms ammunition, Panzerfausts and grenades being discovered in local dumps.

    9 June
    Divisional Parade on the aerodrome at ROTENBURG “Farewell to Armour” and welcoming the 6TH BRIGADE back into the Division. Field Marshal MONTGOMERY took the salute and also made an address. Full details given in programme attached.

    10 - 11 June
    -

    12 June
    Battalion Advance Party left to recce the new Battalion area at COLOGNE.

    13 - 15 June
    -

    16 June
    Battalion left WESTERVESEDE and stayed the night at BECKUM W.2323.

    17 June
    Battalion arrived at WEIDEN 3560.

    18 June
    Took over the area of STADTKREIS COLOGNE from the American Unit.
    The Battalion billeting area is in the village of WEIDEN as COLOGNE, where the Battalion’s responsibilities are, is too bombed to provide good billets.
    The guard duties occupy two Companies and half of Support Company, thus allowing a change over of alternate three days on, four days off, four days on, three days off.
    The V.P’s are as follows:-
    CASSENDORF Camp (9,000 Russians);
    ETMAL Camp (4,600 Poles);
    The RHINE Bridge;
    The Prison;
    Telephone Exchanges;
    Food Warehouses.
    Guards on several public utilities such as waterworks and electric power stations that the Americans had, are now no longer considered necessary and have been dropped.
    There have been no reported cases of ‘Werewolf’ activity or sabotage but there have been a considerable number of incidents between D.P’s and Germans.

    19 - 30 June
    -
     
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    June Appendices

    [hr]

    GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION

    “FAREWELL TO ARMOUR” PARADE

    ROTENBURG AIRFIELD GERMANY 9 JUNE 1945

    [hr]

    ADDRESS BY FIELD-MARSHAL MONTGOMERY TO THE GUARDS DIVISION - 9, JUNE 1945

    1 . The Field-Marshall began by saying that the German war being over, it was interesting to consider how it was that we had won when in 1940 and in 1941 and even in 1942 it had seemed quite impossible that we should ever win. There were many reasons for this, but he always considered that there were two reasons which were basically the main cause of the enemy’s defeath.

    Firstly, the great mistakes made by the enemy beginning in 1941 when the Germans attacked Russia and Japan attacked the Americans, thus bringing these two great nations in on our side.

    Secondly, the good fighting qualities of the Allied soldiers among whom the fighting man of the British Empire stands out in a proud position.

    2 . The Field-Marshal then went on to speak as follows:

    “And now I want to say something about your Division.

    When this war began the Guards were infantry.

    At a time of great national danger in 1941 the Guards formed armoured formations. The Guards Armoured Division and the 6 Guards Armoured Brigade fought throughout this historic campaign in western Europe.

    I don’t suppose there is any officer in the Army who can speak with such weight of experience as myself about the relative standards of battle efficiency of this or that formation or unit. From Alamein to the Baltic, I have had many formations and units under my command.

    I want to say, here and now, that in the sphere of armoured warfare the Guards have set a standard that it will be difficult for those that come after to reach.

    In modern war it is the cooperation of all arms, armoured and un-armoured, that wins the battle, and in this respect you have achieved great results. In fact, the Guards have shown that whatever they are asked to do - whatever they take on - they do well: maintaining always the highest standards and giving a lead to all others. You will long be remembered for your prowess in armoured war.

    And now you are to return to your traditional role of infantry.

    Some of you may wonder why this is so. There are many reasons.
    First: The King wishes it.
    Second: the Brigade of Guards as a ???le are anxious that this should be done”
    And third: I myself, an infantry soldier of many years service, would say to you that you are needed as infantry. The infantry arm has come right to the fore in this wary; it is the most versatile of all the arms; nothing can be done without infantry to help; there is never enough infantry for the tasks that have to be done.

    It is vital that the infantry of the British Army should be a firm and strong rock on which to build the post war Army. It is the central core of the fighting machine, on which all else depends.

    We need you in the infantry; we need your high standards, your great efficiency in all matters, and your old traditions of duty and service; all these are needed to help weld the infantry arm into a firm and solid basis on which to build.

    And so I welcome you back into the infantry.

    You can look back with pride on your excursion into the realms of armoured war-fare; and the experience there gained will always be valuable to you.”

    3 . The Field-Marshal finally made the following remarks about the Divisional Commander.

    “I don’t know whether the officers and men of the Guards Armoured Division, now the Guards Division, realise how much they owe to General Allan Adair. From my position as Commander-in-Chief I know the answer to this straight away and I can tell you that answer.

    General Allan trained the Division for battle in England; he then took it across the Channel to Normandy and commanded it there in the great battles south of the Seine; he then led it through France; through Belgium; through Holland; then into Germany and commanded it till the war ended.

    Throughout all this time he never failed me and he never failed you; he gave of his best that the Division might do well in battle and he has reaped his full reward. You owe to him more than you can ever repay. And I will go further, I would say that the Brigade of Guards was lucky to have ready an officer like General Allan to handle this armoured matter for them, few officers could have done it so well. In front of you all I wish to congratulate General Allan on having brought the matter to such a successful conclusion.”

    [hr]

    Commander Guards Armoured Division
    Major-General ALLAN ADAIR, CB, DSO, MC

    Commander 5 Guards Armoured Brigade
    Brigadier N.W. GWATKING, DSO, MVO

    Commander 6 Guards Amoured Brigade
    Brigadier W.D.C. GREENACRE, DSO, MVO

    Commander 32 Guards Brigade
    Brigadier G.F. JOHNSON, DSO

    Commander Royal Artillery Guards Armoured Division
    Brigadier H.C. PHIPPS, DSO

    [hr]

    PROGRAMME OF EVENTS

    The Parade is formed up with Guards infantry units and representative detachment flanking the Saluting Base.

    In the centre of the Arena the units facing the Saluting Base include 5 Guards Armoured Brigade, 2 Household Cavalry Regiment, Royal Artillery Regiments, Royal Signals and 2 Armoured Welsh Guards.

    1 . Commander-in-Chief arrives and the “General Salute” takes place.

    2 . Inspection of the Guards Armoured Division by the Commander-in-Chief.

    3 . The Final Salute by the Armour.

    4 . The departure of the Armour and the Farewell to the Guards Armoured Division.

    5 . 5 and 6 Guards Brigades and 2 Household Cavalry Regiment (as Divisional Reconnaissance Regiment) take their place in the ranks of the Guards Division.

    NATIONAL ANTHEM.

    [hr]

    GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION

    September 1941 - June 1945


    The Guards Armoured Division was formed in the summer of 1941 as a direct result of the expected German invasion of Great Britain, and assembled in September around Warminster. Originally 6 Guards Armoured Brigade was included in the Division but it later became and Independent Tank Brigade. Most of the units and Services have been with the Division since the beginning, including the Leicestershire Yeomanry and 21 Anti-Tank Regiment which are now leaving.

    After prolonged training on Salisbury Plain, in Norfolk, and on the Yorkshire Wolds, the Guards Armoured Division landed in France last June and it had two months of hard fighting in the Normandy bridgehead. The Division then crossed the River Seine and took part in the sensational advance through Belgium into Holland, completing then the most rapid advance of a Division in history - from Douai to Brussels, 97 miles, in 14 hours.

    Units of the Division were first of the Allied ground forces to enter Holland and Germany for it was a patrol of 21 Anti-Tank Regiment that crossed the German frontier on the 21 September 1944.

    During the Winter and early Spring, the Division was busily engaged in battle and then on 30 March it crossed the River Rhine finally ending up at Cuxhaven. During this last advance of some 400 miles the Divisional Sappers built no less than 50 bridges.

    6 Guards Armoured Brigade, which is now welcomed back into the Division, took part in much hard fighting in the Normandy bridgehead and throughout the campaign has supported a dozen different divisions in battle. It was in the forefront of the advance from the Rhine to the Baltic and one once occasion the Churchill tanks completed 66 miles in seven hours.

    P1400206.JPG P1400207.JPG P1400208.JPG P1400209.JPG P1400210.JPG P1400211.JPG P1400212.JPG

    [hr]


    APPENDIX

    5TH BATTALION COLDSTREAM GUARDS
    NOMINAL ROLL OF OFFICERS AND WARRANT OFFICERS AND COLOUR SERGEANTS AS AT 1 JUNE 1945 (Amended)

    BATTALION H.Q.
    Lieutenant-Colonel E.R. HILL DSO - Commanding Officer
    Major B.E. LUARD MC - Second-in-Command
    Captain J.N. AGNEW - Adjutant
    Captain J. PEREIRA - Intelligence Officer
    Captain & Quartermaster S.B.R. COOPER - Quartermaster

    Captain J.B. INGRAM, ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS - Medical Officer
    Captain Reverend R.H. TOMLINSON, ROYAL ARMY CHAPLAINS DEPARTMENT - Padre
    R.S.M. R.W. SMITH DCM - Regimental Sergeant Major
    R.Q.M.S. E. LOVEJOY - Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant
    Drill Sergeant R. SKELLS
    Drill Sergeant J. COWLEY DCM

    H.Q. COMPANY
    Major A. GIBBS - Company Commander, H.Q. Company
    Captain H. WHITWELL - M.T.O., H.Q. Company
    Lieutenant A.K. FEILING - Signal Officer, H.Q. Company
    Lieutenant P.R. SPURGIN - Pioneer Officer, H.Q. Company
    C.S.M. A SEATHERTON - Company Sergeant Major, H.Q. Company
    C.Q.M.S. J. CONNELLY - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, H.Q. Company

    NO. 1 COMPANY
    Major D.A. KENNARD MC - Company Commander, 1 Company
    Captain A.B. PEMBERTON - Second-in-Command, 1 Company
    Lieutenant J.G.B. CHESTER - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    Lieutenant E.R. FIFOOT - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    Lieutenant T.A. MATHESON - Platoon Commander, 1 Company
    Lieutenant P.H.K. MERRIAM - 1 Company
    Lieutenant J.M. GALE - 1 Company
    C.S.M. F. FARNHILL, DCM - Company Sergeant Major, 1 Company
    C.Q.M.S. E. PATERSON - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 1 Company

    NO. 2 COMPANY
    Major The Honourable D.M.G.J. WILLOUGHBY - Company Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant C.N. ACHESON GRAY - Second-in-Command, 2 Company
    Lieutenant Lord BALGONIE - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant The Honourable P.A. STRUTT - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant D.E. PLATER - Platoon Commander, 2 Company
    Lieutenant R.C. TREASURE - 1 Company
    C.S.M. C. EGAN - Company Sergeant Major, 2 Company
    C.Q.M.S. E. HAYES - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 2 Company

    NO. 3 COMPANY
    Captain W.J. STRAKER SMITH - Company Commander, 3 Company
    Captain The Earl of PLYMOUTH - Second-in-Command, 3 Company
    Lieutenant The Honourable J.U. KNATCHBULL - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    Lieutenant R.P. LAURIE - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    Lieutenant E.I. WINDSOR-CLIVE - Platoon Commander, 3 Company
    Lieutenant W. WARDE-ALDAM - 3 Company
    C.S.M. S. BERRY - Company Sergeant Major, 3 Company
    C.Q.M.S. A. TOWNSEND, MM - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 3 Company

    NO. 4 COMPANY
    Captain R.E. PHILIPS, MC - Company Commander, 4 Company
    Lieutenant G.H.G. DOGGART - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    Lieutenant D.L. SHELDON - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    Lieutenant T.S. GLAISTER - Platoon Commander, 4 Company
    Lieutenant C.J.S. FRENCH - 4 Company
    C.S.M. N. REID - Company Sergeant Major, 4 Company
    C.Q.M.S. C. STEWART - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 4 Company

    SUPPORT COMPANY
    Major G.B. MACKEAN - Company Commander, Support Company
    Captain B. BLOWER - Anti-Tank Platoon Commander, Support Company
    Lieutenant J.G. PORTER - Second-in-Command Anti-Tank Platoon, Support Company
    Captain M.W. WALL, MC - Carrier Platoon Commander, Support Copany
    Lieutenant B.I.J. BRIDGER - Second-in-Command Carrier Platoon, Support Company
    Lieutenant The Honourable J.J. ORMSBY-GORE - Mortar Platoon Commander, Support Company
    Lieutenant J.G. HOBLYN - Support Company
    C.S.M. G. TILLING - Company Sergeant Major, Support Company
    C.Q.M.S. T. THORNTON - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, Support Company

    ON ATTACHMENT
    Lieutenant E. STRAGHAN - Attached H.Q. GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION
    Lieutenant M. BENDIX - Attached H.Q. 32 GUARDS BRIGADE
    Lieutenant M. BONSEY - Attached Division Transport Company


    [hr]
     
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    1 July 1945
    Colonel The Lord STATHEDEN, Regimental Lieutenant-Colonel visited the Battalion and stayed several nights while arranging for the future inter-Battalion changes.

    2 - 9 July
    -

    10 July
    "FAREWELL TO 5TH BATTALION PARADE”
    The Battalion paraded in the COLOGNE Sports Palast at 1700 hours. The G.O.C., Major-General ADAIR attended the parade; after taking the Salute and inspecting the Battalion he made a short address, and the Battalion then marched off for the last time to the Regimental Slow March.

    11 - 13 July
    -

    14 July
    “COLDSTREAM D-DAY”
    Change-over made of personnel to fit the Battalion for its new role and circumstance, as the demobilisation Battalion.

    15 - 27 July
    -

    28 July
    The Battalion contingent 220 strong, left WEIDEN in M.T. and went to BRUSSELS for the GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION Parade.

    29 July
    BRUSSELS Parade, for full account see copy of “News Guardian” attached APPENDIX A APPENDIX A

    30 July
    Battalion contingent returned to WEIDEN.
     
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    July Appendices

    [hr]

    APPENDIX A

    The NEWS GUARDIAN
    Vol. 2, No. 20
    Tuesday, 31st July, 1945
    Today’s Weather - Unsettled

    The first “News Guardian” Picture Supplement of the BRUSSELS Parade will appear on Friday.
    Tomorrow's Issue will contain the full story of Mannekin Pis.

    “HAIL! GUARDS DIVISION”
    Brussels’ Great Ovation
    BRUSSELS, Saturday
    In glorious weather today the people of BRUSSELS turned out to pay tribute to the men of the GUARDS ARMOURED who, one September evening nearly a year ago, had fought their way into the centre of the city, bringing with them the gift of freedom. Many ties of affection have linked the friendly people of the Belgian Capital with the men of the DIVISION, and that these ties still live vividly in their memories was demonstrated today by the warmth of the welcome accorded to our troops by the tens of thousands of citizens who lined the city’s boulevards.

    Several hours before the parade was due to arrive in the great open space in front of the majestic PALAIS DE JUSTICE, crowds were taking up their positions along the route and behind the barriers erected by the Military Police. From a balcony high up in the Palais I could see little groups packing the window spaces of every surrounding building. From the next balcony Godfrey TALBOT recorded his decryption of the ceremony for the B.B.C. Before the first strains of the Bands had been faintly heard in the distance, far-off figures had appeared on the roofs. A chef in white apron and hat sat on the slates of a restaurant; groups of girls squatted on chimney stacks; boys climbed as high as they dared in the trees.

    Picture the solid mass of the PALAIS DE JUSTICE, perched high on a hill, towering over every other building in BRUSSELS. Along the long rows of steps which lead into the building, hundreds of spectators face the parade ground. In front of them, at the foot of the stairs, a dais is filled with red plush, gilded chairs. To the left three giant flagstaffs - two Union Jacks flanking the Divisional Emblem. To the right the broad highway along which the cars of the Belgian Queen Mother, the Burgomaster of BRUSSELS, the British Ambassador will drive up to the dais. Straight ahead the Rue de la Regence up which the parade is now marching.

    While the crowd waits an announcer explains to them the details of the ceremony they are to witness, naming the regiments one by one, recalling the events of that historic 3rd of September. The HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY, whom they greeted in armoured cars, are the same regiment whose magnificent uniforms and splendid horses many of them saw before the war in WHITEHALL. The WELSH GUARDS are those whose tanks suddenly appeared at 8 p.m. at the GARE DU MIDI, the reminds them. Then, as he concludes with a tribute to the contingent from the BELGIAN BRIGADE, already in position behind the memorial on the left, the great broad column of the Bands comes in sight. We can hear the first cheering, the handkerchiefs are waving wildly. The liberators of BRUSSELS have come back to receive the tokens of gratitude and honour which the Burgomaster is to present on behalf of his people.

    The dais is filled with distinguished people, thought the three most notable are yet to come. His eminence the Archbishop of MALINES, Cardinal van ROEY, stands out in his scarlet clerical robes. Lieutenant-General Sir Charles LOYD, Brigadier N.W. GWATKIN, Colonel SHERMAN, Lieutenant-Colonel H. ABEL SMITH, DSO, and many others are there. Prominent Belgian figures include Mme. la Comtesse de CLERVEAUX, Comte G. de HENRICOURT de GRUNNE, M. l’Echevin CATTEAU, M. l’Echevin C. VERHEEGHE de NAEVER, Mme. C. Van der STRAETEN-BEST. The hereditary Grand Duke of LUXEMBOURG, is also present.

    Lying on drums in front of the dais are the standards which are later to be presented. The bamboo poles are surmounted with a wreath of laurels and the proud figure of the Belgian lion. The standards, the work of craftsmen, show the Belgian coat of arms in yellow on a red background, the whole surrounded with a broad green border. Above the coat of arms is the crest of each regiment, and below the regiment’s name, the simple words: BRUSSELS, 3rd September, 1944.

    The plaques, lying in red cases depict the gothic pinnacles of the HOTEL DE VILLE, with the smoking summit of the PALAIS DE JUSTICE in the background. The top left-hand corner bears the city’s crest - St. Michael triumphant over the Devil - while in the lower right-hand corner the Union Jack and the Belgian flag fly side by side. The inscriptions are worded in this manner: “Presented by the people of BRUSSELS, with grateful thanks for their liberation, to the Officers and men of the ‘X’ Company, SCOTS GUARDS, GUARDS ARMOURED DIVISION, September 3, 1944.”

    LOUD CHEERING
    A spontaneous burst of cheering and clapping marked the progress of the parade down the Rue de la Regence, then the bands came into view, followed by the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY contingent who led the parade. They were commanded by Major E.J.S. WARD, MC. The remainder of the parade stretched far up the broad road, eight straight columns of marching men, with row upon row of arms swinging in time. The whole parade seemed to be split up with khaki and black blocks, as the armoured and infantry units swung into view. At one time it seemed as if the parade would never fit in the tremendous open square, but with the precision that is attached to the BRIGADE OF GUARDS the world over, the parade was formed up, facing the dais with the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY, being the senior regiment on parade, taking the right of the line. On their left were the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the GRENADIER GUARDS, 2nd and 3rd Battalions IRISH GUARDS, ‘X’ Company SCOTS GUARDS, 1st and 2nd Battalions WELSH GUARDS, 1st and 5th Battalions COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 84th Medium Regiment, ROYAL ARTILLERY, 21st Anti-Tank Regiment, ROYAL ARTILLERY, 94th L.A.A. Regiment, 55th Field Regiment, ROYAL ENGINEERS, ROYAL SIGNALS, units of the ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS, ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS and ROYAL ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL CORPS. Drawn up on the left of the GUARDS DIVISION were men of the 1st BELGIAN BRIGADE looking extremely smart in their battledress, and webbing belts, commanded by Major P. PONCELOT. This Brigade supported the GUARDS DIVISION in practically all its operations including the fastest advance in the history of armoured warfare to BRUSSELS. They received a tremendous ovation from their countrymen as they marched to their allotted position on the parade ground.

    AWAITING THE GUESTS
    The G.O.C. then took his place at the head of the parade, and the whole DIVISION awaited the arrival of the distinguished guests. A car suddenly swung into view, and the trumpeters of the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY heralded the arrival of the Burgomaster of BRUSSELS (M. J. Van de MEULEBROECK) with a fanfare that echoed around the walls of the ancient Palais. The next arrival was the British Ambassador to BELGIUM, Sir Hugh Montgomery KNATCHBULL-HUGESSEN, KCMG, who was preceded by two outriders from the Divisional Provost Company. As the car rolled to a halt the massed bands played the British National Anthem, and the Division came to ‘attention’ as if one man.

    There followed a pause in the proceedings while the arrival of H.M. QUEEN Elizabeth of the BELGIANS was awaited. The pipes of the IRISH and SCOTS GUARDS played two marches, the tune of which had hardly died away before the Royal car appeared. The G.O.Cs command cracked across the parade ground, and as the Queen Mother alighted from the car, the strains of the National Anthem of our Ally crashed out.

    TROOP
    The G.O.C. then gave the order “Troop” and the massed bombs, their instruments flashing in the blazing sun marched in slow time across the parade ground to the marital melody of ‘Les Huguenots’ as the band slowly moved across the square, the drums crashing out the time, the amount of applause and cheering reached tremendous heights, its climax being as the bands counter-marched with precision, the colours of the kilts of the SCOTS and IRISH Pipe Bands blending with striking effect. Centre of admiration were the two Warrant Officers leading the band, C.S.M. K. HOOPER, COLDSTREAM GUARDS, and Drum-Major GRAHAM of the SCOTS GUARDS.

    On the downward beat of the Drum Mace, the music ceased, only to break into a march in quick time, and the band smartly resumed their former position. The beat of rolling drums floated across the arena, and recipients of plaques came forward for the presentation. The G.O.C., Commander 5TH GUARDS BRIGADE and Officers commanding ‘X’ Company, 2nd Battalion SCOTS GUARS, 153 Field Regiment, ROYAL ARTILLERY, 55th Field Regiment, ROYAL ARTILLERY, 21st Anti-Tank Regiment received the plaques from the Burgomaster. By this time the standard bearers and their escorts armed with rifle, and bayonet fixed, had formed up at the head of their respective regiments. The colour parties consisted of one Officer, one Warrant Officer and two sergeants. In the case of the HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY however the standard was carried by the Regimental Corporal Major, and in this case, R.C.M. T. POUPART received the Colours. His escort was composed of one Squadron Corporal Master (S.C.M. J. BERESFORD), Corporals of the Horse J. NEIL, and J. JENKINS. The contingent represented the two regiments, the LIFE GUARDS and the ROYAL HORSE GUARDS that were together at the teime of the Liberation of BRUSSELS. The LIFE GUARDS have now left the DIVISION, but the contingent contained representatives of the regiment.

    THE PRESENTATION
    The Colour parties then marched to the Dais, where the Burgomaster made the presentation. In a brief speech in halting English, he said the standards demonstrated the deepest gratitude felt by the Belgian people, especially those resident in BRUSSELS, for their liberation by the men of the GUARDS DIVISION on that memorable day in September, the day that not one Belgian would forget. Moving to orders given by the G.O.C. the Colour parties, their standards fluttering bravely in the slight breeze “about turned” and faced the parade. Once more the escorts moved like machines as the oder “Present Arms” was given, and the Belgian National Anthem was played. Then with the rifles at the slope once more, the Colour parties slow marched across the square and rejoined their regiments.

    Once more the order was given, and the rifles seemed to leap to the “Present” and the strains of the British National Anthem swelled across the parade ground.

    Major General ADAIR then took his place at the head of the DIVISION and gave the order “Guards Division and Belgian Brigade will march past in quick time”; this order was taken up by the officer commanding 2nd HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT detachment and the parade moved forward wheeling to march past the saluting base, each unit giving “Eyes right”.

    Once past the saluting base the Division marched through the crowded streets where the cheering crowds having seen the procession by, raced through the back streets in an endeavour to see it through once again. Large bands of enthusiastic ATS amateur photographers snapped the parade from every angle, one even scrambling on top of the “News Guardian” scout car to obtain a snap of the GRENADIERS wheeling in to the Royal Park.

    G.O.C. TAKES SALUTE
    In the park itself the G.O.C. took the salute, and after the Colours had been shown to the men the DIVISION received the order to “Dismiss”, their ears stil full of the ringing cheers from the people of BRUSSELS demonstrating their affection for the liberators, who they affectionately calle “the Eye soldiers”.

    In the evening an Other Ranks’ Dance was held at the 21 Club. The band of the GUARDS DIVISION was in attendance, and during the evening Major General ADAIR, accompanied by Mrs. ADAIR visited the Club, and watched the Cabaret.

    The floor was packed, and ‘The Lambeth Walk’, and all the popular dances of the season were enjoyed. An excellent running buffet and bar was in great demand.


    [hr]


    APPENDIX

    The NEWS GUARDIAN
    Vol. 2, No. 4
    Thursday, 12th July, 1945
    Today’s Weather - Unsettled


    COLDSTREAM GUARDS BID FAREWELL
    “Fighting Fifths” Last Parade

    General Allan ADAIR Pays Tribute
    by a Guardian Reporter

    COLOGNE STADIUM, Tuesday, (Delayed)
    Tonight we bade farewell to the 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM GUARDS, the “Fighting Fifth”, as the Divisional Commander so aptly described them.

    Their fighting days over, men of the Battalion are being gradually absorbed into other Battalions. Tonight was the farewell parade, with the whole Battalion present, and Major-General Allan ADAIR, C.B., D.S.O., M.C., took the salute and later paid tribute to the fighting qualities of the Battalion.

    Unfortunately the Regimental Band was away in HAMBURG, but deputising for them was the Battalion Corps of Drums under Drum-Major OSBORNE which gave yeoman service and earned bouquets from everyone.

    Sharp at 6.30 p.m., the General arrived, and the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant-Colonel E.R. HILL D.S.O, gave the general salute.

    General Allan came down from the stand, acknowledged Colonel Roddy’s salute, shook hands with him and then began his inspection.

    The Battalion was drawn up in companies in the following order:-
    Support Company - Major G. MACKEAN.
    H.Q. Company - Major A. GIBBS.
    No. 1 Company - Major D. KENNARD, M.C.
    No. 2 Company - Major The Honourable M. WILLOUGHBY, M.C.
    No. 3 Company - Captain T. STRAKER-SMITH
    No. 4 Copmany - Captain R. PHILLIPS, M.C.
    In front of the Support Company stood the Second-in-Command, Major B.E. LUARD, M.C., and the Adjutant, Captain N. Agnew. Behind them R.S.M. “Dusty” SMITH, D.C.M., R.Q.M.S. LOVEJOY (shortly to leave the Regiment after 25 years service), Drill Sergeant SKELLS - his moustache looking even more waxed than ever, and Assistant Drill-Sergeant COWLEY, D.C.M.

    WELCOME REAPPEARANCE.
    Accompanying the General were the Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding COLDSTREAM GUARDS, Colonel Lord STRATHEDEN, who was making his first appearance since being wounded at CAGNY while commanding the Battalion. With him were the A.A. & Q.M.G., Lieutenant-Colonel R.F.S. GOOCH, D.S.O., M.C., and Captain the Honourable A.D. TRYON, A.D.C. whose black beret was a reminder that in former days the DIVISION had once been armoured.

    The inspection lasted 28 minutes and General Allan stopped ot speak to many men in the ranks.

    On his return to the stand the General moved to the microphone preparatory to making his speech. His opening sentence was “Right-hand man of the rear rank, rais your hand.” Away in the distance a hand appeared, and we knew that the Battalion signallers had done a good job.

    The General’s speech is reported in full on Page 2.

    AULD LANG SYNE.
    Afterwards General Allan moved down to the saluting base and the end was near. The Commanding Officer ordered “slope arms”, and the Battalion could never have sloped arms better than on this particular occasion. Then - “move to the right, right turn” and a few seconds later the Battalion was on its last journey to the tune of the Regimental Slow March. Away they marched, all heads turned to the left towards the General and as they were about to disappear from view the Drums broke into “Auld Lang Syne”.

    It was all very dramatic, and as the guardsmen reached the exit to the stadium, the music became fainter and fainter until the last man was out of sight. The Drums counter-marched, halted and the strains of “Auld Lang Syne” died away.

    A few seconds later the Drums returned, playing the Regimental March. They marched across the stadium and wheeled to a halt in front of the saluting base. Drum-Major OSBORNE asked for permission to dismiss and the Ceremony was complete.

    Another glorious page in the annals of the COLDSTREAM GUARDS had been written.


    Page 2.
    FAREWELL ADDRESS TO THE FIFTH BATTALION
    The following is the text of the Divisional Commander’s speech at the “Farewell” Parade of the COLDSTREAM GUARDS on Tuesday.

    The General said “Now that the war is over we come to a period of change and re-organisation. The old firm has to be be broken up. We have said farewell to our tanks and now to-night we have to say farewell to the fighting 5th Battalion. It is in many ways a sad moment but don’t forget the war is won and such re-organisations are inevitable.”

    “Now I feel no one is more qualified than I, who had to great fortune to command the Division throughout this Campaign to say to you ‘Well done’. I have seen you fight in every battle throughout the Campaign.”

    Continuing the General said “For a moment let us turn back to those many battles you fought, and I would say here and now that the 5th Battalion COLDSTREAM have fought in more battles than any other Battalion in the DIVISION, and the Battalion has gone from strength to strength. Turn back for a moment to that time when the Battalion landed on the beaches of NORMANDY under the command then of that fine leader Colonel ‘Sandy’ who we are delighted to see fit and well with us here this evening.”

    FANATICAL PARATROOPERS
    “You had that tough fighting in the bridge-head at that horrible place by the airfield at CAEN where minnies dropped, CAGNY, and on the the BOCAGE country, all those many fights there - tough ones nearly all - and then we had that glorious time when we crossed the SEINE where you led the way with the tanks, on to ARRAS and DOUAI, then on to BRUSSELS where after a short pause for light refreshments we continued on to the ALBERT CANAL and BEERINGEN, and I always think that battle you fought at HEPPEN near BOURG LEOPOLD was the key to the whole subsequent operations. Those Bosche paratroopers were fighting fanatically and unless you had succeeded in wiping out the bridge-head to the West any subsequent advances would have been extremely difficult.”

    The General went on to say “Then we went gaily on to NIJMEGEN where you supported the 82nd U.S. AIRBORNE DIVISION, and when the centre line was cut you went and cleared it, and when we wanted more food you went and took OSS and provided the DIVISION with more food including some horrible ersatz coffee.”

    "Now I pass on to Operation VERITABLE”, said the General. “That battle of yours in smashing the WESEL bridgehead has become world famous. That relentless advance on a very narrow front - it had to be narrow - against strong opposition, backed up by the tanks as usual, somehow has struck the imagination and indeed it was a very fine action.”

    No. 3 COMPANY’S GALLANT ACTION
    “Then on the 30th March we crossed the RHINE and the end of the Campaign was in sight. But as you know well, plenty of tough fighting remained for us. I need not detail to you that gallant action of No. 3 Company on the bridge over the EMS, the seizing of that bridge under the magnificent leadership of Captain Ian LIDDELL. We, everyone in the BRIGADE OF GUARDS and in the DIVISION, are proud of his memory and proud of those who took part in that operation. You were strongly helped there as always by the tanks and the results were inevitable and magnificent.”

    "You passed on and captured ROTENBURG, you went on to capture ZEVEN, and finally you crossed the OSTE CANAL, and V.E. DAY came along. What could be a more fitting climax than the disarming of your old opponents the 7th Para Division by yourselves and the 1st Battalion. It was a fitting climax to a great Campaign.”

    PROUD CHAPTER
    "Now in a few minutes you will be marching off to the strains of ‘Auld Lang Syne’. Old teams will perhaps be broken up in a few days, old friendships for the moment severed, but remember each one of you, wherever you may be or wherever you go, you have been sent with a very high standard of conduct and achievement in this Battalion, and it is always up to you individually to keep that standard up.”

    "I congratulate Colonel Roddy who has led you so well, and I congratulate every one of you. You have added a proud chapter to the history of your Regiment. And I say you have proved that the 5th is well worth of your Motto: ‘Nulli Secundsus’.”
    - ​

    UNREHEARSED INCIDENT
    There was an amusing incident during the ‘Fighting Fifth’s’ Farewell parade on Tuesday evening. It happened whilst the G.O.C. was inspecting the battalion. The Corps of Drums was playing, when without any warning, Lance-Corporal B. SAURIN saw the head of his bass drum stick fly off in the direction of Drill Sergeant COWLEY.
    To Lance-Corporal B. SAURIN’s relief, or was it disappointment?, it missed by inches.


    LIST OF AWARDS
    The following awards have been won by members of the 5th Battalion:-
    VICTORIA CROSS
    Captain I.O. LIDDELL

    DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
    Lieutenant-Colonel E.R. HILL

    Bar to MILITARY CROSS
    Major D.A. KENNARD, M.C.

    MILITARY CROSS
    Major The Honourable D.M.G.J. WILLOUGHBY
    Major J.d’H. HAMILTON
    Captain The Honourable M.W. WALL
    Captain D.I.T. EASTMAN
    Lieutenant R.G. LOMER
    Lieutenant The Honourable T.A. STRUTT

    DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
    R.S.M. R.W. SMITH
    Drill Sergeant J. COWLEY
    C.S.M. F. FARNHILL

    MILITARY CROSS
    Lance-Corporal A.E.M. HENRY
    Sergeant D. BROOKES
    Lance-Sergeant A.V. LOWE
    Guardsman D. BARTLETT
    C.Q.M.S. A.W. TOWNSHEND
    Guardsman W. BUTTERS
    Guardsman R. GREIG
    Lance-Sergeant W. CLITHEROE
    Lance-Sergeant J. LINDSEY
    Lance-Sergeant D. JORDAN
    Sergeant N. DUCKWORTH
    Lance-Corporal J.E.W. ROYAL

    MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES
    Major The Marquis of HARTINGTON
    Major The Honourable D.M.G.J. WILLOUGHBY
    Captain The Honourable M.W. WALL
    Lieutenant C.D. LAWRIE
    Guardsman T.H. WILKINS


    [hr]


    APPENDIX
    5TH BATTALION COLDSTREAM GUARDS
    NOMINAL ROLL OF OFFICERS AND WARRANT OFFICERS AND COLOUR SERGEANTS AS AT 24 JULY 1945.

    BATTALION H.Q.
    Lieutenant-Colonel E.R. HILL DSO - Commanding Officer
    Major The Honourable G.W.ff. DAWNAY, MC - Second-in-Command
    Captain P.W. LOYD - Adjutant
    Captain J. PEREIRA - Intelligence Officer & German Disarmament Officer
    Captain & Quartermaster P.H.K. MERRIAM - Quartermaster
    Lieutenant C.N. ACHESON GRAY - Education Officer

    Captain J.B. INGRAM, ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS - Medical Officer
    R.S.M. E. MOORE - Regimental Sergeant Major
    R.Q.M.S. C. PYE - Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant
    Drill Sergeant J. COWLEY DCM
    Drill Sergeant F. CLARKE

    H.Q. COMPANY
    Major A. GIBBS - Company Commander, H.Q. Company
    Lieutenant D.C.G. JESSEL - Signal Officer, H.Q. Company
    Lieutenant W.A. WESTERMAN - M.T. Officer, H.Q. Company
    Lieutenant P.G.E. GREENWELL - Pioneer Officer, H.Q. Company
    C.S.M. S. OWEN - Company Sergeant Major, H.Q. Company
    C.Q.M.S. J. CONNELLY - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, H.Q. Company

    NO. 1 COMPANY
    Major A. WATKINS - Company Commander, No. 1 Company
    Lieutenant J.K. AMBLER - Second-in-Command, No. 1 Company
    Lieutenant A.J. BELL - Platoon Commander, No. 1 Company
    C.S.M. W. STEELE - Company Sergeant Major, No. 1 Company
    C.Q.M.S. F. ROGERS - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, No. 1 Company

    NO. 2 COMPANY
    Major C.G. TENNANT - Company Commander, No. 2 Company
    Captain J.D.G. FORTESCUE - Second-in-Command, No. 2 Company
    Lieutenant E.M. HERBERT - Platoon Commander, No. 2 Company
    2/Lieutenant R.H. LUCAS - Platoon Commander, No. 2 Company
    C.S.M. J. GREENWELL - Company Sergeant Major, No. 2 Company
    C.Q.M.S. E. HAYES - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, No. 2 Company

    NO. 3 COMPANY
    Captain J.G.H. BARTON - Company Commander, No. 3 Company
    Captain A.C.M.B. SCOTT - Second-in-Command, No. 3 Company
    Lieutenant A.S. CLOWES - Platoon Commander, No. 3 Company
    Lieutenant R.P. LAURIE - Platoon Commander, No. 3 Company
    C.S.M. J. GROVE, MM - Company Sergeant Major, No. 3 Company
    C.Q.M.S. A. TOWNSEND - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, No. 3 Company

    NO. 4 COMPANY
    Captain J.F.L. BAYLEY - Company Commander, No. 4 Company
    Lieutenant The Honourable G.H. BOSCOWEN - Second-in-Command, No. 4 Company
    Lieutenant J.W.F. TENNANT - Platoon Commander, No. 4 Company
    Lieutenant C.J.S. FRENCH - Platoon Commander, No. 4 Company
    C.S.M. N. REID - Company Sergeant Major, No. 4 Company
    C.Q.M.S. R. OXENDALE - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, No. 4 Company

    SUPPORT COMPANY
    Major M.V. MILBANK, MC - Company Commander, Support Company
    Lieutenant Lord BRABOURNE - Anti-Tank Platoon Officer, Support Company
    2/Lieutenant R.B. BARTER - Platoon Commander, Support Company
    C.S.M. T. MOODY - Company Sergeant Major, Support Company
    C.Q.M.S. G. BRUNDLE - Company Quartermaster Sergeant, Support Company

    ON ATTACHMENT
    Captain J.A.L. LEE - Attached H.Q. 32 GUARDS BRIGADE
    Lieutenant E. STRAGHAN - Attached H.Q. GUARDS DIVISION
    Lieutenant D.E. PLATER - Attached GUARDS DIVISION PROVOST COMPANY
    Lieutenant M. BENDIX - Attached H.Q. 32 GUARDS BRIGADE
    Lieutenant E.R.S. FIFOOT - Attached Training Cadre, DANISH ARMY
    Lieutenant The Honourable M.E. JOICEY - Attached H.Q. 32 GUARDS BRIGADE
    Lieutenant M. BONSEY - Attached Division Transport Company
     
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