Victoria Crosses That Never Were....

Discussion in 'General' started by Drew5233, Apr 17, 2010.

  1. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Just reading on page 306 of England's Last War With France about Capt Palmer going back to rescue a wounded crewman of a Valentine whilst fighting the Vichy troops in Madagascar.
    The author says Brigadier Festing recommended Palmer for the VC but instead got a MC.
    In the index he is listed as Palmer, Captain Peter Llewellyn.
    Checking on CWGC he was not called that nor awarded an MC , his brother was.
    PALMER, PETER MICHAEL GEORGE is buried in Madagascar.
    He was in fact twice Mentioned in Despatches
    CWGC :: Casualty Details

    His brother ,with the MC,
    PALMER, JULIAN LLEWELLEN
    CWGC :: Casualty Details
     
  2. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    Just reading on page 306 of England's Last War With France about Capt Palmer going back to rescue a wounded crewman of a Valentine whilst fighting the Vichy troops in Madagascar.
    The author says Brigadier Festing recommended Palmer for the VC but instead got a MC.
    In the index he is listed as Palmer, Captain Peter Llewellyn.
    Checking on CWGC he was not called that nor awarded an MC , his brother was.
    PALMER, PETER MICHAEL GEORGE is buried in Madagascar.
    He was in fact twice Mentioned in Despatches
    CWGC :: Casualty Details

    His brother ,with the MC,
    PALMER, JULIAN LLEWELLEN
    CWGC :: Casualty Details

    Maybe it's a mistake. He was probably awarded with MiD instead of VC because MC couldn't be awarded posthumously (at list not until 1979).
     
  3. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Forgot to say he was supposedly awarded the MC for the leadership he displayed before the actions in which he was killed.
    Seems Colin Smith got that bit wrong too.
     
  4. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Reading 'A Roll Of Honour' by Maj-Gen JG Elliott.
    In chapter about the fighting in the Keren an extract from the HLI history is quoted.
    Pround Heritage: The Story of the Highland Light Infantry

    Mark Hollis , company commander is mentioned as recommended for VC & Sgt-Maj McMillan the DCM.

    McMillan's DCM citation attached. Notice it's for actions later in March 1941 not the episode in the book.
    Name McMillan, William Joseph
    Rank: Acting Company Serjeant Major
    Service No: 33088515
    Regiment: 2 Battalion The Highland Light Infantry
    Theatre of Combat or Operation: Middle East (East Africa and Madagascar); Middle East (Malta)
    Award: Distinguished Conduct Medal
    Date of Announcement in London Gazette:18 July 1941

    Major Mark Hollis got nothing.
    CWGC :: Casualty Details

    Name:HOLLIS, MARK WILLIAM
    Initials:M W
    Nationality:United Kingdom
    Rank:Major
    Regiment/Service:Highland Light Infantry (City of Glasgow Regiment)
    Unit Text:2nd Bn.
    Age:26
    Date of Death:29/01/1941
    Service No:63628
    Additional information:Son of Sir Alfred Claud Hollis, G.C.M.G., C.B.E., and Lady Hollis (nee Longman), of Widdington, Essex.
    Casualty Type:Commonwealth War Dead
    Grave/Memorial Reference:1. D. 2.
    Cemetery:KEREN WAR CEMETERY
     

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  5. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    I think it worth mentioning another VC that "never was":

    Following on Gerry's excellent summary of the Dieppe raid I must mention a series of coincidences that have led me to make this posting.

    On Sept 6th I shall be attending my old boy's club reunion and, as always, the table talk will get around to former members who are no longer here to join in our talk of WW2. At my particular table, because we have several vets there, Jack Nissenthal's name is invariably brought to mind.

    I was recently interviewed, about the club, on spitalfieldslife.com and the interviewer known only by his pseudonym of "The Gentle Author" was intrigued by the story of Jack Nissenthal, a former club boy, who was taken to Dieppe to find out about German radar accompanied by a special troop who had instructions to kill him rather than allow him to be taken prisoner. He also placed a link on his Blog so that others might read the story.

    A well known authority on Jack's history is Martin Sugarman and his newly published book "Fighting Back" contains a full chapter on Jack's exploits.

    I've also just been to Wikipedia and on the pages relating to Dieppe found this item:
    Dieppe Raid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I was amused to find that footnote No.10 took the reader to the BBC WW2 Archives to an article that I had previously posted myself on behalf of Martin Sugarman !

    The Wikipedia excerpt now follows:

    Pourville radar station
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Destroyed Landing craft on fire with Canadian dead on the beach. A concrete gun emplacement on the right covers the whole beach. The steep gradient can clearly be judged


    One of the objectives of the Dieppe Raid was to discover the importance and accuracy of a German radar station on the cliff-top to the east of the town of Pourville. To achieve this, RAF Flight Sergeant Jack Nissenthall, a radar specialist, was attached to the South Saskatchewan Regiment. He was to attempt to enter the radar station and learn its secrets, accompanied by a small unit of 11 men of the Saskatchewans as bodyguards. Nissenthall volunteered for the mission fully aware that, due to the highly sensitive nature of his knowledge of Allied radar technology, his Saskatchewan bodyguard unit were under orders to kill him if necessary to prevent him being captured. He also carried a cyanide pill as a last resort. Nissenthall and his bodyguards failed to enter the radar station due to strong defences, but Nissenthall was able to crawl up to the rear of the station under enemy fire and cut all telephone wires leading to it. This forced the crew inside to resort to radio transmissions to talk to their commanders, transmissions which were intercepted by listening posts on the south coast of England. The Allies were able to learn a great deal about the arrays of German radar stations along the channel coast thanks to this one simple act, which helped to convince Allied commanders of the importance of developing radar jamming technology. Of this small unit only Nissenthall and one other returned safely to England.[10][11].
     
  6. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    From post #44 above
    Major Mark Hollis got nothing.


    I was wrong , just searched London Gazette & he was 'Mentioned'.
    Viewing Page 2870 of Issue 36065

    Gazette Issue 36065 published on the 22 June 1943. Page 18 of 18

    Lt (temp Capt) (acting Maj) M.W. Hollis (63628) . (Killed in action.)
     

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  7. ww2ni

    ww2ni Senior Member

    It was disgraceful that Lt Col Robert Blair "Colonel Paddy" Mayne was never awarded a Victoria Cross.

    I my opinion it was simply because he was unpopular with a number of Senior Officers.
     
  8. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    Sepoy Gawanda 11480
    1st Bn, 17th Dogra Regiment (P.W.O.)

    Recommended for the Victoria Cross (Posthumous)
    Awarded with the Indian Order of Merit (Posthumous)

    On 26 Jan '44 Sep. Gawanda was No.1 of the 2“ Mortar in one of the leading platoons attacking Wrencat Three. His mortar was placed in a position from which to support the attack but as our own troops and the enemy became mixed up it was unable to give any effective support.
    After the first bayonet assault on the objective had failed Sep. Gawanda handed over his 2“ Mortar to the No.2, borrowed a rifle and bayonet and by himself charged the bunker posn which was only a few feet away. He was wounded by grenades and returned. He then borrowed a tommy gun and again charged the same bunker single handed. The tommy gun jammed so he returned and for the third time, armed with Dah only, he charged the bunker. He was killed on the bunker by a burst of fire from it.

    His supreme courage, determination and self sacrifice was an inspiration to all those who saw him. Sep. Gawanda set an example which was later followed when the enemy bunker was (temporarily) captured by a bayonet charge.
     

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  9. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    W.S. Naik Partab Sing 16154
    4th Bn, 7th Rajput Regiment

    Recommended for the Victoria Cross (Posthumous)
    Awarded with the Indian Order of Merit (Posthumous)

    On 6th September 1944, Naik Partab Singh was one of the leading sections commanders of a platoon of A Company which was ordered to locate enemy, who's were holding a dominating position immediately above MS 114 on the Tiddim Road in Burma.

    The leading platoon of “A“ Company, the advance guard Company of the Battalion, were held up by L.M.G. fire from this feature and could get no further forward on the road. The Company Commander there fore, left this platoon to watch and harrass the feature, and took the rest of his Company up the ridge to a point on the crest overlooking the enemy position, with a view to holding that point as a firm base with one platoon and pushing his last platoon down the spur to locate and if possible clear enemy centre of resistance. The advance of this last platoon was at first through very thick jungle and high elephant grass which led eventually to a broad clearing made to take the telegraph line. Naik Partab Singh's platoon was in process of crossing this clearing when it came under heavy and accurate L.M.G. fire from 15 to 20 yards' range and was pinned to the ground. Naik Partab Singh's section suffered 50% casualties and was lying about 10 yards from and immediately in front of one of the enemy bunkers.

    Without the slightest hesitation and with the greatest coolness Naik Partab Singh, though he himself had received a painful though not serious grenade wound in his face, advanced alone to the mouth of bunker and emptied his Tommy Gun into it. He was killed whilst doing so but the L.M.G. was silenced and his action enabled the remaining fit men of his section to assist the forward advance of the remainder of the platoon by covering fire.

    By his complete disregard for his personal safety and his immediate acceptance of certain death, this N.C.O. not only saved the lives of his section who were in a apparently inextricable position, but also enabled the platoon to achieve its object without further casualties.

    His very gallant deed and his heroic death were in the highest tradition of his race.
     

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  10. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    Rifleman Dal Sing Thapa 28797
    3rd Bn, 2nd K.E.VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

    Recommended for the Victoria Cross
    Awarded with the Indian Order of Merit

    Myebon, Arakan

    On 17 Jan 1945, 28797 Rfn. Dal Sing Thapa was No.1 of a bren gun in D Coy during the assault and capture of Pt 262 402463. His section led an infiltration attack onto the hill by moving up a steep path. Half way up the hill the section came under heavy MMG, LMG Grenade and Mtr fire. Rfn. Dal Sing, though fully exposed to this fire covered first his section and later his pl in an outflanking movement to the left by firing at the enemy in their dug in posns. He was wounded in the neck by a grenade but kept his gun in action and, by well directed fire which knocked out one enemy LMG and drew the fire of another on to his posn, allowed his pl to work round to the flank. He then rejoined his pl which had been held up by further heavy fire. He moved to the left flank of the pl and again brought well directed fire to bear on the enemy to cover further flank exploitation by another pl. He was wounded again but kept his gun in action covering the assault of the second pl until it was near its objective that further fire was dangerous. Then, on his own initiative, he charged forward under heavy fire, climbed to the top of a pagoda stump and though wounded and under heavy fire, fired point blank into a strongly held enemy weapon pit. This action undoubtedly paved the way for the successful attack of the assaulting pl. He remained in action and drew the greater proportion of the heavy enemy MMG and LMG fire to his exposed and easily recognizable posn. He was badly wounded again in the head, but continued to keep his gun in action against enemy strong points though still under heavy fire. At last, exhausted by loss of blood he collapsed and rolled to the bottom of the pagoda stump.

    This young soldier's initiative and determination was undoubtedly one of the main causes of the early capture of the summit. He showed a fearless devotion to duty and a magnificent will to close with the enemy. His courage and gallantry was far more then that called for by duty. He was a shining example of bravery even amongst Gurkhas.
     

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  11. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    Rifleman Dhanbahadur Tamang 109767
    4th Bn, 10th Gurkha Rifles

    Recommended for the Victoria Cross (Posthumous)
    Awarded with the Indian Order of Merit (Posthumous)

    On 28 Dec '44 at Wainggyo, Burma the Company to which No.109767 Rfn Dhanbahadur Tamang belonged was in position astride the Jap line of withdrawal. The Company had orders to kill all Japs attempting to withdraw.

    Early on the morning of 28 Dec '44 Rfn. Dhanbahadur Tamang spotted a large body of Japs trying to work round a flank. Shouting to his Sec. Comd. that he had seen hundreds of Japs and was going to kill them he charged down towards them. He killed nine with two grenades and threw enemy into confusion. Having no more grenades this Rfn. then started to use his rifle killing one more before he himself was killed. By this time however the rest of his Coy. had closed with the enemy party and in the ensuing action killed fifty five including two officers. By his heroic action Rfn. Dhanbahadur Tamang threw the enemy into confusion and enabled his Coy. to complete their destruction. This rifleman's superb courage, determination and complete disregard for his own life was an inspiration to the rest of his company and will live in the memory of all those who sew him die.
     

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  12. sapper

    sapper WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    May I ? I have always felt that the army was reluctant to award medals. There were many times when the actions of some were worthy of recognition ,But were ignored. Some the bravest of the brave.
     
  13. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    Company Havildar Major (acting) Bhagtabahadur Gurung 6456
    4th Bn, 5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (F.F.)

    Recommended for the Victoria Cross
    Awarded with the Indian Order of Merit

    *I couldn't read part of the text from his citation and that's why I didn't transcribe it.
     

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  14. Jedburgh22

    Jedburgh22 Very Senior Member

    It was disgraceful that Lt Col Robert Blair "Colonel Paddy" Mayne was never awarded a Victoria Cross.

    I my opinion it was simply because he was unpopular with a number of Senior Officers.

    One of the problems with Special Forces and the VC is that the criteria for award normally state that the action must be witnessed by a senior officer hence many SOE, SAS and other SF being awarded the DSO
     
  15. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    L/Naik Jog Raj 22119
    5th Bn K.G.V's (J.R.) 10th Baluch Regiment

    Recommended for the Victoria Cross (Posthumous)
    Awarded with the Indian Order of Merit (Posthumous)

    Pear Hill, South of Ngapyin-In on the night of 25/26 Jan 45, during the heavy fighting in the Bridgehead on the east bank of the river Irrawaddy, No.22119 L/Nk Jog Raj was in comd of the Bren Gun Group, consisting of himself and two other Dogra Sepoys, of the section holding the Pagoda area on the hill.

    During the night the Japanese made repeated and very determined attacks against this sector of our perimeter but L/Nk Jog Raj repelled them all, remaining cool and encouraging his men by his outstanding example and complete indifference to danger under heavy enemy fire, although casualties in his coy were becoming increasingly heavy.

    At about 0515 hrs, the Japanese closed in for their final assault under an intense barrage. L/Nk Jog Raj by his coolness and personal example kept his group in action firing steadily in spite of the intensity and accuracy of the enemy fire and kept shouting encouragement to the rest of his platoon who were also hard pressed. One after the other his gun crew were knocked out at their gun. Undaunted, L/Nk Jog Raj himself manned the gun and kept it in action under hail of enemy mortar bombs, continuing to shout encouragement to his platoon, until a direct hit knocked out the gun.

    By this time the enemy, in superior numbers, had closed right up to our position. His gun being out of action, L/Nk Jog Raj seized a rifle and bayonet, jumped out of his trench and single handed charged into the enemy. Some he shot, two he bayoneted and fighting fiercely he drove back the enemy but was himself at last killed in the effort. The enemy drew off leaving five dead which he himself had accounted for lying round his body.

    Although it cost him his life, the superb courage shown by this young NCO was an inspiration to all. His action in charging single-handed into numbers of attacking Japanese, well knowing that it meant his certain death, was an act of outstanding valour in keeping with the highest traditions of the Indian army and of his race, and was decisive in turning the scales against the enemy in a fierce engagement on a vital sector of our Bridgehead.
     

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  16. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    W.S. Hav. Gabar Sing Bisht 6856
    1st Bn, 18th Royal Garhwal Rifles

    Recommended for the Victoria Cross (Posthumous)
    Awarded with the Indian Order of Merit (Posthumous)

    On 5th Feb 45 on Ramree Island (Burma) No.6856 Hav Gabar Sing Bisht was with his company when it was ordered to capture a feature known as Banana Ridge. This was a long steep rasor-backed ridge running North & South & rising 350 ft above the surrounding paddy fields. The crest of the ridge had a series of peaks on it which rose higher & culminated in the highest peak at the Southern end. This peak was some 25 ft above its neighbors, & connected by a narrow steep path. The slopes of the ridge on either side were so steep that the path was the only possible approach. In unsuccessful attempt having been made on the peak the previous day disclosed that the path was covered by Jap machine gun fire.

    Hav Gabar Sing Bisht was Pl Hav of the forward platoon which was directed on to the Southern peak with the object of capturing it. To reach this objective involved a long exhausting climb up to and along the crest from the Northern end. The platoon had reached the forward slopes of the peak against moderate opposition and were within thirty yards of the top when two LMGs suddenly opened up on either side of the path. This caused a stream of bullets from both flanks to cross on the path ten yards ahead of the leading section. At the same time the Japs with tommy guns poured volley after volley from the peak down on the advansing troops. Hav Gabar Sing Bisht saw that four men had been hit in the leading section. Amongst these was the leading Bren gunner who was protecting the right flank of the advance. Realising that the platoon was exposed to a possible risk from that flank, Hav Gabar Sing Bisht from his position behind the leading section, without hesitation rushed forward through a hail of enemy small arms fire and seizing the Bren gun from the wounded gunner fired into the jungle in the direction of the threatened flank. Shrieks and yells from the Japs testified to the coolness and accuracy of Hav Gabar Sing Bisht's appreciation and action, which doubtlessly saved many lives. During this action the rest of the company following along behind suffered nine more casualties including Hav Gabar Sing Bisht's own Pl Comdr. Above the noise he could be heard shouting to his platoon orders for some to get beck the casualties & the remainder to rush the peak. This proved impossible owing to the terrific volums of small arms fire, now mixed with grenades, which poured down on them. While the wounded were being taken away Hav Gabar Sing Bisht remained to cover them. Then calling up a rifleman to take his place at the gun he run beck to reorganise his platoon. While doing so the right hand machine gun suddenly opened up from a heavily camouflaged bunker position from the right of the path. Hav Gabar Sing Bisht at once volunteered to rush it with grenades. He dashed back straight at the post and as he did so a Jap grenade burst at his feet. He staggered and his hat fell off, blood streamed from his head and heck but he did not falter. As he reached the bunker Japs rose from it and run. Hav Gabar Sing Bisht threw three grenades into the bunker. The enemy machine gun was silenced and when the dust had cleared he was seen standing over a huddle of bodies. Shouting "I have killed that lot, follow me, there is another one" he made in the direction of the left flank enemy machine gun which was spattering the jungle around him. Suddenly he stopped and pitched forward within 15 yards of the gun position.

    His body was recovered the following day He had four bullet wounds in the chest and six in the throat. His face and neck were mess of blood from grenade wounds.

    Hav Gabar Sing Bisht's act of selfless courage and unfaltering determination culminating in the supreme sacrifice, was, besides being instrumental in making possible the eventual capture of this vital position, an inspiration and example to all ranks and worthy of the highest traditions of his race.
     

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  17. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    W.S. Naik Jagmal 16428
    8th Bn, 19th Hyderabad Regiment

    Recommended for the Victoria Cross
    Awarded with the Indian Order of Merit

    A large hill, known as "Perth", overlooks Kangaw gap through which run the Japanese road to the South. The top of "Perth" consists of three separate pimples, each of which risen abruptly from the main feature, which is itself extremely steep. It was strongly held by the enemy and all our attempts to seize it had failed. Progress was slowly made on other parts of the Brigade front and it finally became essential to secure "Perth" at all costs in order to allow penetration through the gap. As it was possible that the enemy had withdrawn from "Perth", which had been subjected to considerable artillery and air bombardment, a company fighting patrol was despatched to reconnoitre the hill. The company was ordered to consolidate on the hill if it was found to be unoccupied, and to return with information of enemy strengths and locations if it was still held. The intention was to stage a Battalion attack, with strong air and fire support, should this prove to be necessary.

    On 13 Feb 45 Naik Jagmal was commanding the leading section of the company detailed to carry out the task. He and his men scaled the hill side and reached a point about fifty yards from the crest of the first pimple without opposition. Then, suddenly, heavy small arms and grenade fire was opened on them from the summit of the pimple in front and from the position on the right flank.

    Without hesitation Naik Jargal shouted "Charge" to his section and dashed ahead. He saw a bunker on the top and immediately assaulted it alone. He killed three Japs and put the remainder to flight, but was himself wounded in the leg. Undeterred by heavy fire he rushed on to the second pimple, threw grenades into the bunker on it and went straight on, still alone and still under fire, to the third.

    He threw grenades into the bunker on this last and highest pimple, stood up on the summit, shouted "RAM CHANDAR JI KI JAI" and, exhausted by his exertions and loss of blood, fell to the ground. He was soon joined by his section and the remainder of his platoon which completed the destruction of every Jap who had not fled. "Perth" had been captured at last.

    It was found that each of pimples was crowned by a large bunker and that there were two more bunker positions in a saddle to the flank. Several japs were seen to escape through the scrub and twenty-five were found dead in the bunkers. The position must have been hold, at this stage, by at least a strong platoon.

    When he was being carried to the R.A.P., Naik Jagmal said with pride to his Commanding Officer, pointing at "Perth", "I took it – I made the Japs run".

    He had.

    The story of Naik Jagmal's amazing feat will undoubtedly be told, and remain an inspiration to his brother Ahirs and the entire Indian Army, for all time.
     

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  18. 51highland

    51highland Very Senior Member

    One of the problems with Special Forces and the VC is that the criteria for award normally state that the action must be witnessed by a senior officer hence many SOE, SAS and other SF being awarded the DSO

    Not just special forces I suspect. As Sapper has suggested, some medals richly deserved were never awarded or even suggested to be awarded. I have met many vets who have said certain men should have been awarded some sort of recognition, but never did.
     
  19. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    Sepoy Jarnail Singh 18280
    7th Bn, 14th Punjab Regiment

    Recommended for the Victoria Cross
    Awarded with the Indian Distinguished Service Medal

    On 14 Oct 44 No.18280 Sep Jarnail Singh was No.1 of L.M.G. in a patrol of 25 men on the Mankheng Ridge in the Chin Hills.

    At about 0600 hrs this patrol was attacked by an enemy force of over 300 with 31 L.M.G.s and supported by five 3" mortars. As soon as attack started Sep Jarnail Singh rushed forward under heavy mortar and L.M.G. to cover withdrawal of an isolated O.P. By the skillful us of his gun he succeeded in driving off the enemy almost surrounding the O.P. which was then able to get away intact though Sep Jarnail Singh himself was badly wounded. Though suffering from a shattered lower jaw and multiple body wounds this sepoy refused to hand over his gun or to accept assistance. As the overwhelming enemy force continued to close in upon the patrol from several directions, Sep Jarnail Singh dragged his gun forward to places where enemy pressure was greatest and by accurate fire prevented several attempts to rush the position. Later when ammunition was running short and our casualties were mounting the patrol commander ordered a withdrawal to a lay-back position, and again Sep Jarnail Sinhg refused to hand over his gun. As the patrol slowly withdrew, moving back the wounded, the enemy pounded the area occupied by Sep Jarnail Singh who, though subjected to intense mortar and L.M.G. fire, continued to handle his gun with such vigour that the enemy were unable to follow up. It was not until an almost direct hit by a 3" mortar bomb literally blew the gun from his grasp and again wounded him severely that Sep Jarnail Singh moved back to join the patrol. Even then though weakened by loss of blood and fatigue after a three hour battle he tried to borrow arms to renew the fight.

    By his determination, coolness and complete disregard of his own personal safety he not only enable his wounded comrades to be evacuated but also inflicted serious losses upon the enemy. Sep Jarnail Singh displayed valour of the highest order and in keeping with the best traditions of his martial race.
     

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  20. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    WS/Naik Jejbahadur Thapa 15104
    4th Bn, 1st King George V's Own Gurkha Rifles (Malaun Regiment)

    Recommended for the Victoria Cross (Posthumous)
    Awarded with the Indian Order of Merit (Posthumous)

    On the night 21/22 March 1945 the platoon, in which this N.C.O. was a Sec Comd, was detached from the rest of the Coy in a village commanding the eastern approaches of Myingyan, was attacked by a far superior force of Japs who broke through, to the centre of position. Naik Jejbahadur's section took the main force of the attack which actually reached the Pl HQ. He directed his section's fire backwards on to the enemy who had forced the position in large numbers. All the grenades in his section were quickly used up, many of his men were wounded and his Tommy gun had jammed. Without a thought for his own safety he threw down his Tommy gun and whipped out his khukri and alone charged through the enemy to Pl HQ to get more grenades. He then fought his way back through the enemy to his section posn hurling grenades as he went. Having issued out all the grenades to his section he threw his own grenades and than taking out his khukri again charged the enemy single handed killing at least one Jap and fought his way to the LMG position which had by now ceased firing as the Bren gunners had both been wounded. He was however only able to fire few bursts as an enemy grenade thrown at him mortally wounded him in the chest and abdomen. Lying on the ground and dying from his wounds he continue to exhort his section and to shout orders until the enemy attack had finally been beaten off. He was then brought into Pl HQ where he died of his wounds 10 minutes later.

    This Naik's many acts of heroism during the Jap attack, his devotion to duty and complete and utter disregard for his own safety was an example pf courage of the highest order. Through his courage and direction, even while mortally wounded, the attack was finally driven off and a vital position denied to the enemy which resulted in the final capture of Myingyan the next day.
     

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