VERITABLE 1945: the Canadian finale (Moyland Wood & Goch-Calcar road)

Discussion in 'WW2 Battlefields Today' started by stolpi, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    As a 'spin-off' of my WW2talk activities, I've been asked by the Dutch Military to conduct a small Battle Field Tour on the battle of Moyland Wood (16 - 21 Feb 45). Thanks to gpo's son and klambie of this forum, who provided valuable links and documents, the BFT, which took place in December 2012, was highly successful. With the help of DYRCH, Dryan and klambie - who provided me with further documents/war diaries - this topic now also covers the other operations of the Canadian 2nd Corps during the final stage of Veritable (15 - 22 Feb, 1945). The fighting during this period revolved around the Canadians creating a good starting position from which to launch the projected 2nd Cdn Corps attack: Operation Blockbuster.

    This thread is divided in two parts:
    Part 1 contains a work-out of the BFT to Moyland Wood with focus on the operations of the 7th Cdn Inf Bde; VERITABLE: the Canadian finale (Moyland Wood & Goch-Calcar road)

    Part 2 is about the Canadian operations which took place at the same time along the Goch - Calcar road. Here the 4th Cnd Inf Bde was hit and nearly overrun by a major counterattack of the 116th Pz Division and an attached battlegroup of the Panzer Lehr Division. In fact the battle signalled the end of Veritable, which explains the title of this thread.

    This one is for the Canucks!

    Moyland Wood 017a.jpg
    Part of the BFtour group at the Langenhorst Farm (D on the map in post #2). The Katzenbuckel feature (4 on the map in post #2) is visible in the background.

    Victory-37.jpg

    Annex 1 Aerials of the battlefield : VERITABLE: the Canadian finale (Moyland Wood & Goch-Calcar road)
    Annex 2 The 1st Cdn Armoured Personnel Carrier Regt (APC) Memorial at Mill : VERITABLE: the Canadian finale (Moyland Wood & Goch-Calcar road)
    Annex 3 The 10th Cdn Armoured Regt (Fort Garry Horse) memorial at Doetinchem: VERITABLE: the Canadian finale (Moyland Wood & Goch-Calcar road)
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2018
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  2. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    Last edited: Nov 14, 2016
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  3. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    The plan of attack

    16 Feb 45.png


    At the close of 15 Feb 45 it was obvious that the 46 Bde, spearheading the advance of the 15 Scottish Division towards Calcar, had run out of steam. The 7th Seaforth, advancing along the main road running from Cleve to Calcar, was stalled just before Moyland Castle. The road and the flats north of it were rapidly becoming impassable by fast rising floodwaters. On the high ground to the south, the 2nd Glasgow Highlanders ran into stiff oppostion in the woods at the 'Hollow Road' near the Tillemanskath Farm. The 9th Cameronians, skirting the forest to the south, along the Bedburg to Calcar road - the Alte Bahn (Old Road) - succeeded in penetrating into the forest behind the German 'Hollow Road' position. But the task proved much more difficult than was anticipated. The Cameronians ran into fierce opposition and suffered heavy losses. By the evening of the 15th, they held an isolated position on a high feature, known as the 'West Knoll'. The only bright spot occurred on the right, where the 10 HLI (227 Bde), temporarily attached to 46 Bde, protected the right flank along the Alte Bahn. At midnight, 15/16 Feb, the 10 HLI conducted an attack in dense fog, and captured the high ground and scattered farm houses to the south of Moyland Wood, past the lateral road running south from Moyland. The battalion rounded up some 80 POWs, but was immediately counterattacked and had to pull back slightly. Without contact on both flanks, the 10 HLI occupied a lonely position. It remained to be seen whether it could accomplish it's subsequent task, the clearance of the wood on the left at first light. Though the 46 Bde had nearly reached the lateral road running from Moyland Castle to Louisendorf, it was encountering stiff opposition and it was evident that the exhausted battalions were unable to continue much longer.

    Kleef Canadians.jpg
    Canadian troops assemble in a street in Cleve for a move forward by TCV's . On 15 Feb 1945 the 2nd Cdn Corps took over the left flank of Veritable. The Corps had under command the 2nd and 3rd Cdn Infantry Divisions and the 4th Cdn Armoured Division. The 2nd Cdn Inf Div and 4th Cdn Arm Div were still in reserve well in the rear near Nijmegen. The Bdes of the 3rd Cdn Inf Div were more or less concentrated around Cleve; 8 Bde was screening the dikes along the Rhine River to the northwest, the 9th Bde to the north of Cleves with positions taken up at Griethausen and Kellen, while the 7th Bde was acting as reserve and concentrated in the town itself.

    At this stage of Operation Veritable, it was decided to insert Lieutenant-General Guy Simonds' Canadian 2nd Corps into the battle. While the British 30 Corps turned its attention to the capture of Goch, Simonds' Corps (with 2 and 3 Cdn Inf Divs, supported by 2 Cdn Arm Bde) was given the task of opening the route to the Hochwald and Wesel; a new operation to reinvigorate the campaign code-named Blockbuster. Floods and the road conditions impeded a quick build up of 2nd Cdn Corps strength near Cleve, while Simonds had little time to consider the new role his corps was to carry out, as the takeover of some 2,000 metres of front was scheduled for Feb 15th. The next day 7 Cdn Infantry Brigade (3 Cdn Inf Div), commanded by Brigadier Jack Spragge, supported by squadrons of the Scots Guards, was to pass through the positions held by 46th Bde (15th Scottish Division), which was temporarily attached to the 3rd Cnd Infantry Division, and push eastwards towards Calcar and the heights south of that town, so as to obtain a favourable starting line from where 2nd Corps could launch its offensive, Operation Blockbuster. Moyland Wood and the Calcar Heights had to be cleared by the 3rd Cdn Inf Div and it had to be done quickly. Or as General Spry, the GOC of 3rd Div, said after the war: "Simonds was pushing me and I was pushing the brigadiers and battalion commanders. He was very determined. Just by the glint in his eye and the set of his jaw you knew what he wanted. When he was angry, he became icy." The 7th Cdn Inf Bde's plan was to advance with two battalions up and one in reserve; on the left the Regina Rifles were to move forward through the wooded area and clear the rest of Moyland Wood as far as the high ground at Heseler Feld, on the right the Royal Winnipeg Rifles, moving forward over open rolling country in Kangaroos, were to secure the village of Louisendorf and the high ground surrounding it. There both battalions had to dig in, forming a start line for a further bounce by the 4th Cdn Bde (2nd Cdn Infantry Div) towards the Goch - Calcar road. H-hour for the 7th Bde's operation was 1330 hrs on Feb 16th.

    The plan seemed straightforward, but Moyland Wood, a mixed forest cloaking a low, hilly escarpment, just over two miles long and only one-third of a mile wide, would prove a hard nut to crack and in the end absorbed all of 7th Cdn Inf Bde's attention. Moyland Wood had to be taken. The high ground not only stood over the main road from Cleve to Calcar running along the northern edge of the forest, but from the bluffs the enemy also had a good view of the terrain to the south and could check it with his artillery which was in position across the Rhine. The eastern extension of Moyland Wood, where much of the action would take place, is an petty piece of forest; it's poorly maintained, uninviting, dreary, gloomy, in other words not a place for a cheerful walk in the woods. Yet it would become the scene of one of the bitterest actions of the campaign for the 3rd Cdn Inf Div.


    008a.jpg
    View of the main road Cleve - Calcar, looking westwards in the direction of Cleve. The trees to the right mark the course of the road. The advance of 7 Seaforth, along the main road, was held up in the woods in the far back, beyond the farmhouses.

    Just across the main road Moyland Castle from which derives the name of the wooded area south of it.

    Moyland Castle a.png

    Moyland Castle then ...
    Moyland then.png

    The castle and its immediate surroundings were finally taken without a fight on Feb 22, 1945, the day following the final conquest of Moyland Wood. The Germans had decided to abandon the area north of Moyland Wood and fell back on a new defense line near Calcar.

    Attached the derelict Moyland Castle as it appeared in 1950
    Moyland Castle 1950.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2018
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  4. Paul Reed

    Paul Reed Ubique MOD

    Good to see you back posting quality material. It is much appreciated.
     
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  5. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    The first day, Feb 16, 1945

    By dawn on the 16th, the 46th Bde was still fighting to gain the Start Line of the Regina's attack, the lateral road running south from Moyland Castle. At 0700 hrs 'B' Coy of the 9th Cameronians launched an attack against the East Knoll in Moyland Wood and captured the feature. Though experiencing fierce resistance and repelling several counterattacks, they held on to the ground untill the 7th Bde attack at 1330 hrs. In the meantime on the right flank, the 10th HLI, set about its task to clear the wood, by sending 'C' Coy across the Alte Bahn. The company was immediately met with intense machine-gun fire that precluded the possiblility of their even gaining the line of the road between them and the wood. After they had suffered several casualties, they were ordered to withdraw to their overnight positions.

    In early afternoon the Canadian attack went in. The attack by the Royal Winnipeg Rifles against Louisendorf, supported by two squadrons of the Scots Guards, proceeded well. The Winnipeg Rifles were picked up from an assembly area back near Bedburg by Kangaroos (converted Ram tanks with the turrets removed) from the 1st Canadian Armoured Personnel Carrier Regiment, and moved to the FUP. Here the British tanks, mine-exploding flail tanks and Kangaroos with the assault companies aboard shook out in battle formation and rolled across the start line at 1400 hrs with 'A' and 'C' Companies leading and 'B' and 'D' in a second wave. The German artillery and rocket fire was extremely heavy, but both the speed of advance and the protection offered by the Kangaroo armour meant that casualties were light on the approach to the village. Each troop of Kangaroos carried a company of Rifles, and on reaching their various objectives the troops leapt over the sides and assaulted. Lt. Harry Badger of 'A' Company won the Military Cross for his leadership role. Louisendorf was taken after some fierce fighting inside the village. The operation yielded 240 POWs, part of whom belonged to the 1st Bn of Pz.Gren.Regt.60 (116th Pz Div).

    The success of the Winnipegs on the right was not matched by the Regina Rifles on the left. Even before they reached the Start Line the Reginas ran into enemy opposition. A thick mist had come down during the night of 15/16 Feb, which enabled the Germans to infiltrate back into the region of the Regina Rifles' forming up place, west of the lateral road. As a result the Regina's had to fight their way forward to the Start Line and ultimately had to break off the attack without even reaching it. Only 'C' Coy moving along the Alte Bahn made good headway and came almost abreast of the south-eastern fringe of the wood. It was during this advance that Sgt Edward Stanley Tinklei earned a MM (see below, post # 13). Not knowing just where the remainder of the battalion was, the CO sent one platoon into the woods, while the rest of the company consolidated in the farm buildings south of the road. But the Germans had not been caught off balance, they actually allowed the platoon - no.15 Platoon under Lt Phillip Shaughnessy - in, by simply moving to higher ground, then closed in behind it. Counterattacks by the Reginas to free the entrapped platoon were driven off. Shaugnessy's men were surrounded and forced to surrender. The entire platoon was lost, with 18 men taken POW. Three men taken prisoner, managed to escape that night and bring the news back to Battalion HQ. Enemy strength in this area was estimated by them at 250 men.

    16 Feb 45 a.png

    002a.jpg
    The East Knoll - locally known as
    Katzenbuckel ('Cats Arched Back') - was secured by 'B' Coy of the 9 Cameronians in early morning of the 16th. View from the north, from the main road near the Moyland Castle. The Germans managed to hold on to the reverse slope of the feature (to the left), where a long communication trench and several dug outs are still visible, while 'B' Coy occupied the top of the hill. The area is labeled #4 in the 7 Cdn Bde's report.

    010a.jpg
    A view towards the east from the British foxhole line on the Katzenbuckel. The green grass, glimmering through the trees, is the meadow on the other side of the lateral road belonging to the adjacent area labeled # 7a in the 7 Cdn Bde report. The deep cut lateral road, in between, is not visible. Though 'A' Coy gained a foothold on the hill. The Germans held on to the backward slopes, from where they brought 'A' and 'B' Coys of the Regina Rifles under flanking fire. On 16 Feb 45, the Canadian opponents were elements of a battalion of the Gren.Regt.858 (346 Inf Div), a unit that had been stripped off from 25th Army near Rotterdam, Holland, and the II. battalion of the Pz.Gren.Regt. 60 (116 Pz Div).


    012a.jpg
    At the foot of the Katzenbuckel. The lateral road from Moyland to Louisendorf enters the Moyland Wood in a steep ascent. View uphill, to the south.


    16a.png
    Further up the lateral road, looking back towards the Moyland Castle. The woodline on the right is labeled #5 in the 7 Cdn Bde's report. Machine guns positioned in this woodline brought 'B' Coy of the Regina Rifles under withering fire and forced it to break off the attack.


    018a.jpg
    Standing at the T-roads at the end of the lateral road, where it debouches on to the
    Alte Bahn, this old milestone is still pockmarked by bullet holes. A silent testimony of the fierce fighting that went on in the surrounding area.

    047a.jpg
    View to the east from the woodline of wood # 1. Wood # 2, which was cleared by 'B' Coy of the Regina Rifles, is just to the left of the greenhouses. Behind the greenhouses runs the lateral road.
    In wood #2, 'B' Company came across a Cameronian officer and five men who had been held by the enemy for 24 hours, and incorporated them into their defensive position which was established as a base for the next day’s operation.

    048a.jpg
    View to the north across the Golf Course greens towards the Katzenbuckel. On 16 Feb the companies of the Regina Rifles were unable to cross this open area, as they ran into cross fire of machine guns from the front and the left. In Feb 45 the area was much more open, than it is nowadays. With the coming of the Golf Course a lot of new plantation was added.

    017a.jpg
    On the other side of the lateral road, a muddy forest ride skirts along the southern edge of wood #5 (left side of the ride). The ground to the south of it was open, giving the German defenders perfect fields of fire. Today the once open area, right up to the
    Alte Bahn, is planted with trees.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2018
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  6. 17thDYRCH

    17thDYRCH Senior Member Patron

    Stolpi,
    Great photos...as usual.
    May I ask how the Dutch military came to find you?
     
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  7. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    Thank you DYRCH. They were preparing a BFT on Op Plunder (Rhine Crossing 1945) and came across my old thread on the Rees Bridgehead.

    I joined them last October for a three-day BFTour.
     
  8. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    The Regina's attack is stalled, Feb 17, 1945

    On Feb 17th, at 1000 hrs, the Reginas made another attempt to cross the lateral road inside Moyland Wood. This time 'B' and 'D' companies were to attack abreast, covered by an extensive artillery preparation. The attack foundered again. The companies had to go to ground, were forced to make a slight withdrawal and dig in. Both companies were pinned down by machine-gun fire and rifle grenades.Their difficulties were compounded by deadly air-bursts as shells detonated in the treetops. It was obvious that a frontal assault across the lateral road was impossible. Lt Col Gregory, the CO of the Reginas, went to Bde HQ at Bedburg, to discuss the continuation of the attack. In late afternoon, the depleted 'C' Coy was withdrawn to the area of the Bn HQ and remained in Bn reserve.

    The Reginas spent the rest of the day with drawing up a new plan of attack: see the article written by Gordon Brown, CO of 'D' Coy: "“The Battle of Moyland Wood”: The Regina Rifle Regiment, 16–19 Februar" by Gordon Brown

    Meanwhile the reserve battalion, 1st Canadian Scottish, advanced through the open country on the Reginas’ right. Though subjected to very heavy fire, the battalion took the high ground overlooking the farms of Heseler Feld and Rosskamp, and held on to this position for three days despite repeated counter-attacks and constant fire. The Winnipeg Rifles at Louisendorf improved their hold on the village.

    17 Feb 45.png

    Goch Calcar rd 045a.jpg
    Looking south from the
    Alte Bahn, across the open, undulating ground towards Louisendorf. The farmhouse in front is located along the Pfalzdorfer Strasse.

    Goch Calcar rd 044a.jpg
    The high ground of the Heseler Feld is a bit hard to catch on my small pocket camera. Standing with my back towards the Rosskamp Farm, I took this picture with a view towards the south-west. On the left the Heselerfeld Farm. The ground was occupied in the afternoon of the 17th by the 1st Cdn Scottish Regt. Though the high ground dominates the Heselerfeld Farm and Rosskamp Farm, it's a pretty exposed position. During their stay, the Cdn Scottish were subjected to an unbroken stream of heavy shell and machinegun fire, and were fiercely counterattacked for several days. Because of the severe losses suffered, it went into the battalion's annals as 'Slaughter Hill'. One company of the Cdn Scottish was virtually wiped out and the remaining three together could field only about 130 men after the fighting ended on Feb 21st.

    021a.jpg
    At the foot of the hill the Rosskamp farm
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2018
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  9. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    Looking for a flank, Feb 18, 1945

    A new attack was planned for Feb 18th with three Regina companies attacking from the south with the support of Wasps, carrier-mounted flame-throwers. During the night the Regina Rifle companies, under cover of a heavy fog, secretly, exfiltrated in small groups from their positions facing the lateral road. They moved along the right side of the Alte Bahn for some 300 yards or more to some farm buildings which were to from the startline. The plan was to outflank the German positions guarding the lateral road, by penetrating through wood # 6 into wood # 7 and # 5 and secure the crest in the area labeled #7a. This way the troublesome positions in wood #4 and #5 could be taken from the rear. H-hour for the attack was 1230 hrs.

    At 2nd Cdn Corps HQ, general Simonds was becoming increasingly frustrated that the Spry's 3rd Cdn Inf Division was not making more progress. It was estimated that the enemy opposing Spragge's 7th Cdn Inf Bde were only exhausted remnants of a battlegroup of the 116.Pz Division and 858.Gren Regt (361st VG Div). Simonds insisted that the exhausted and depleted battalions of 7 Cdn Inf Bde immediately win the day. "Clear those woods!", he repeated to general Spry. It was clear that Spragge's head was on the chopping block and Spry's likely soon to join it. Simonds condemned both for being overly cautious, too worried about avoiding casualties, and lacking verve.

    However, unknown to the Canadians, a determined opponent, the 18.Fallschirmjäger Regiment of the 6. FJ Division (6th Parachute Division), freshly arrived from Holland, had relieved the remnants of the mixed battlegroup, that up to then had resisted the advance in Moyland Wood. The 6. FJ Division was thoroughly indoctrinated in the Nazi cause and of their supposed superiority over the Allied troops. The division, commanded by General Leutnant Plocher, took over the right sector of the German defense which ran from the Rhine -Till - Moyland - Moyland Wood - Kalkarer Berg (south-west of Calcar), a sector formerly held by the battered 84 Inf Division. On 18 Feb a battalion of paratroopers of the 18. FJ Regiment (Major Witzig) had taken over Moyland Wood itself.

    18 Feb 45.png

    Moyland Wood RRR FUP SL.jpg
    Map from the official study: Clearing of Moyland Wood by 7 Cdn Inf Bde. It gives the location of the forming up point (FUP) and start line (SL) of the attack on wood #6.

    Moyland 2 018a.jpg
    The southern edge of wood #6 borders directly on the Alte Bahn. It was here that 'B' Coy of the Reginas at midday, with a slight drizzle falling, under cover of an artillery barrage moved into the forest. The messages that came back told of stiff opposition inside the wood and fierce hand-to-hand fighting with German paratroopers. At 1310 hrs 'B' Company had secured a small foothold in the woods. It was during this action that Serjeant William James Shaw earned a Military Medal (see post #13 below). Two platoon leaders became casualties, Lt.Badger and Sgt. Shaw both were wounded. One of the supporting WASPs lost a track when it ran over a tree-trunk. At 1243 hrs a message came back that another one was blown up. This is where Serjeant Milton Eugene Adolph won his award (see post # 13 below). 'D' Coy, the follow-up company, passed through 'B' Company and charged up to the crest of the ridge in wood #7. The continuous machine-gun fire and shelling were heavy and the numbers of casualties became alarming. Few prisoners were taken during the close hand-to-hand fighting. Some 16 POWs were sent back through 'B' Coy. One of them, a paratroooper, stated that there were 150 men who retreated over the crest of the ridge. They had 5 heavy MGs.


    Snippet from the Intelligence Log of the War Diary of the Regina Rifles, which reports of the plight of the attacking Coys inside the wood:
    Plight of RRR.jpg

    a177577-v6.jpg
    Men of the Regina Rifles waiting for the sign to move up for the attack towards Moyland Wood - the picture was taken on 16 Feb 45


    051a.jpg
    The forest ride running between wood #6 and #7. At 1320 hrs 'D' Coy kicked off, with two platoons forward, one behind. The two leading platoons charged from right to left across the ride, towards the crest of the ridge, about 100 yards further uphill. Enemy resistance on the left was particularly heavy, this however was overcome when 'A' Coy entered the fray and started clearing wood # 5. The German paratroopers immediately retaliated with strong counterattacks from wood #8 and infiltrated between 'B' and 'D' Coys. Both forward platoons of 'D' Coy lost contact with the remainder of the battalion untill late in the afternoon, when the enemy counterattacks were repulsed and a platoon of 'C' Coy was brought up to make good wood #7. Both 'D' Coy platoons, by then, could only muster 8 and 12 men, but they had held their ground against numerous enemy counterattacks. Lieutenant Warren Keating in command of one of the leading platoons was awarded the Military Cross (see post # 13 below).

    031a.jpg
    The northern edge of wood #7 (to the left & projecting) ...

    Goch Calcar rd 003a.jpg
    ... and #5 (right). The latter was cleared by 'A' Coy after a fierce fight. After passing through the 'B' Coy area, at 1330 hrs, 'A' Coy ran into very heavy machine-gun and mortar fire and was temporarily pinned down. The lateral road running south from Moyland Castle, the intended Start Line of the first day's attack, is just visible on the extreme right.

    Moyland Wood 002.jpg
    Same area from the Canadian perspective: view from the forest edge of wood #5 to the north looking towards the northern half of sector #7a. On the right of the picture is an outbuilding of the Bergkath Farm. The German paratroopers held on to the wooded area in the northern half of sector #7a. The Regina Rifles, now much reduced in strength, were unable to capture this last piece of ground. Originally the intention was for 'C' Coy to take this sector, but given the heavy resistance this plan was abandoned and 'C' Company was used to bolster the attained positions. At the back of the wood, as well as behind the Bergkath Farm, the ground makes a sharp drop. Part of the BFTour group is standing at the woods edge, they are hardly visible in their camouflage uniforms but give themselves away by the white maps they are carrying.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2018
  10. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    Dead end, Feb 19, 1945

    In early morning of 19 Feb 45, in order to put an end to the annoying flanking fire on Heseler Feld, 'C' Coy of the 1st Cdn Scottish Regt made an effort to capture the buildings at Rosenboom and enter the woods. It was hoped that the company might reap some benefits from the heavy ground mist to the extent where the men could get close to their objective by stealth without being seen before the pre-arranged 15-minutes artillery barrage came down on the enemy's position. The operation went horribly awry. Most of the company, already much depleted in ranks, was caught in the open by enemy fire and those that were not killed were taken prisoner. Only a handful of men returned to the battalion's lines.

    Apart from shellfire, the 7th Bde reported considerable shelling and mortaring throughout the day, the Regina Rifles experienced no tactical change during the day.

    19 Feb 45.png


    023a.jpg
    View to the northwest from the start line of the Cdn Scottish' attack. The men of 'C' Coy had to advance over this open ground, under the watchfull eyes of the German paratroopers, occupying positions in the Moyland Wood and Rosenboom Farm. The German fire from Hill 30 was especially devastating and split up the attackers. From their positions on Hill 30, just within the forest, the German paratroopers brought down damaging fire on the attacking Cdn Scottish infantry.


    041a.jpg
    The German perspective: looking down from 'Hill 30' towards the southeast, in the direction of the 1st Cdn Scottish attack. The Germans were well dug in; the area is still invested with dugouts and trenches. The Bedburg - Calcar road is visible through the trees.



    Attached a fragment from the History of the 1st Bn Cdn Scottish Rifles describing the attack against Rosenboom
    027a.jpg 028a.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2016
  11. Jonathan Ball

    Jonathan Ball From the North.

    Good to see these threads of yours making a come back, Pieter. Nice one. :smile:
     
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  12. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    The Other Side of the Hill

    There is little detailed information available on the German side of the Moyland Battle.

    It is known that on 18 Feb 45 the 6. FJ Division, under General Leutnant Plocher, hastily transferred from the frontline in Holland, took over the defence in the Moyland sector and a battalion of the 18. FJ Regiment was sent into the woods. After the war a Military Study of the operations of the 6.FJ division was prepared, but it is very summary when it comes to combat actions: http://downloads.stu...RA_FMS_B368.pdf

    Prior to 18 feb 45, the Moyland sector fell under the responsability of the 84th Inf Div, under Generalmajor Fiebig. Fiebig's command was severely mauled in the opening phase of Veritable and had been hurriedly patched up with a variety of units, among which two battalions of the 858. Gren Regt (346. Inf Div) and a number of FJ battalions of the 6. and 7. FJ Div. The 2nd battalion of Pz Gren Regt 60 (116. Pz Div), holding the area south of the forested area, also intervened in the battle in the woods, since the 116. Pz Div feared a breakthrough on its flank. For this same reason the 1st Company of the s.Pz.Jg.Abt 655, with a strength of five Panzerjäger IV tanks, also was deployed here to block the main road to Calcar. Link to Military study of the 84 Inf Div: http://downloads.stu...RA_FMS_B368.pdf

    Plocher at Freudenthal Farm.png
    From a historical point of view, this picture is a little gem, because it depicts Major Witzig (2nd to the right), CO of FJ Regt 18, reporting to General Leutnant Plocher (to the right, with his back to camera), GOC 6. FJ Div. The picture was probably taken on 17 or 18 Feb 45, in the courtyard of the Freudenthal Farm, located halfway between Moyland and Calcar along the main road Cleve - Calcar, which runs just behind the hedgerow in the background of the picture. The Freudenthal Farm served as HQ for the FJ Regt 18. General Plocher points with his arm in the direction of Moyland Wood!

    Goch Calcar rd 048a.jpg
    The Freudenthal Farm today. The picture of Witzig and Plocher was taken in the center of the courtyard. The hedgerow has been replaced by a metal fence (photograph with courtesy of Pen and Dagger).
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2018
  13. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    Awards won by the Regina Rifle Regiment in the Moyland Wood action:

    - Serjeant (Acting Warrant Officer Class II (CSM)) Edward Stanley Tenklei - Military Medal (MM)

    On the 16th February 1945, "C" Company of the 1st Battalion, The Regina Rifle Regiment were the right hand company of a two company attack, with the object of clearing the woods south of Moyland, Germany. In this attack, Sergeant Tenklei was Platoon Sergeant of Number 13 Platoon.

    The advance was made under intense fire and less than half way to the objective, the Platoon Commander was wounded and could not continue. Sergeant Tenklei immediately took over and continued the advance. Three times his platoon was forced to ground by heavy machine gun and light automatic fire and three times this Non-Commissioned Officer organized and led the charge which overwhelmed the positions inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy.

    It was chiefly the superb leadership, courage and example of Sergeant Tenklei that inspired his men to advance and take their platoon objective. His actions on this day were worthy of the highest traditions of this Regiment and the Canadian Army.


    - L27883 Serjeant William James Shaw - Military Medal (MM)

    On the afternoon of the 18th February 1945, "B" Company of the 1st Battalion, The Regina Regiment were leading Company in a battalion attack on the woods south of Moyland, Germany. Number 10 Platoon was the right forward platoon, commanded by Sergeant Shaw.

    As soon as the platoon crossed the start line, they came under extremely heavy shelling, mortar and small arms fire. Seeing that the heaviest part of the barrage was ahead, Sergeant Shaw went to the head of the platoon and led them into the woods. Here, after hand to hand fighting with German paratroops, they gained their objective.

    At this point, Sergeant Shaw was seriously and painfully wounded but notwithstanding, he organized the consolidation of his position and moved from post to post supervising the digging and siting of defences. All this time his position was being heavily shelled, and it was only when his Company Commander arrived and gave Sergeant Shaw a direct order would he consent to go to the Regimental Air Post.

    The superb leadership, bravery and fortitude displayed by Sergeant Shaw was the example which inspired his Platoon to achieve their objective and hold it.


    - Lieutenant Warren Lincoln Keating - Military Cross (MC)

    On 18 February 1945 at approximately 1330 hours, "D" Company of the 1st Battalion, The Regina Rifle Regiment moved off in an attack through "B" Company into the woods south of MOYLAND, Germany. Lieutenant Warren Lincoln Keating was in command of #16 Platoon who were to take a portion of the high ground in the centre of the woods.

    The company met with extremely heavy resistance and the flame throwers, who were to support the attack, were knocked out but Lieutenant Keating led his Platoon, through intense machine gun and mortar fire, direct to their objective, driving the Germans from their slit trenches. On consolidation, Lieutenant Keating found he had only twelve men left and on his left were eight men of #17 Platoon. The remainder of the company were unable to advance, so Lieutenant Keating organized this little group and for five hours drove off repeated counter-attacks, all the while completely cut off from his company and Battalion. Several times the Germans penetrated within his defences but each time the enemy were killed in hand to hand combat.

    After this period, Lieutenant Keating was reinforced by the remainder of "D" Company and for a further period of twenty-four hours the position was repeatedly counter-attacked and each time these were beaten off. Throughout the entire bitter action the enemy poured heavy machine gun and mortar fire into the position.

    The magnificent leadership and courage displayed by Lieutenant Keating was directly responsible for the taking of this important height and although weary from days without sleep, he so inspired and cheered his men that they held it under most adverse conditions.


    - L13577 Serjeant Milton Eugene Adolph - Military Medal (MM)

    Corporal Adolph was a crew commander in number 2 section (WASP) of the carrier platoon and on the afternoon of 18 February 1945 was supporting the attack on the woods south of Moyland, Germany.

    Under extremely hazardous conditions, number 2 section advanced with the leading elements of the first company and gave them close support until their fuel was exhausted. When returning to re-fuel, the section was forced to cross a stretch of open country under direct observation and fire of the enemy. Corporal Adolph was leading with his section commander following and about half way across, the section commander's carrier struck a mine, overturned and burst into flames.

    Without hesitation, Corporal Adolph stopped his carrier, jumped out, and with a fire extinguisher, ran back to the burning carrier. He found the driver dead, the gunner seriously wounded and section commander suffering from shock and blast, and all were pinned beneath the machine. With the enemy dropping mortar bombs about him and with aimed small arms fire directed at him, he got the fire under control and with the assistance of his crew succeeded in extricating the gunner. When they could not release the section commander, Corporal Adolph very quickly dug the earth out from under him with his hands and dragged him free of the fire.

    Corporal Adolph loaded the two men on his carrier and took them to the Regimental Aid Post. Then, taking command of the remainder of the section, he re-fuelled and returned through an area he knew to be mined, and supported the follow-up companies with fire until his fuel was again exhausted and his section was put out of action by the difficult terrain on the edge of the objective.

    Corporal Milton Eugene Adolph's quick action and superb heroism under fire undoubtedly saved the two men from burning to death and his return to the area was instrumental in the taking of the final objective.


    With courtesy of Awards Made - www.reginarifles.ca
     
  14. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    The Winnipegs ("Little Black Devils") clear Moyland Wood, Feb 21, 1945

    When Brigadier Jack Spragge reported that the enemy was too strongly entrenched to be dislodged by his tired infantry battalions, Simonds, indignant at the slow progress, removed the veteran commander, placing the Regina commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Alan Gregory, in temporary command of 7th Cdn Inf Bde.

    As often happens in such situations, Simonds allowed Gregory the time and resources Spragge had lacked. While 7 Cdn Inf Bde fought to clear Moyland Wood on Feb 19th, 4 Cdn Inf Bde launched a set-piece attack from the Louisendorf area to the east and gained a hold on the Goch-Calcar road. This allowed for the Royal Winnipeg Rifles, nicknamed "Little Black Devils", still in position at Louisendorf, to be relieved. On the evening of the 19th, the Royal Winnipegs Rifles' positions were taken over by elements of the 9th Cdn Inf Bde, they left their slit trenches near Louisendorf and moved into position south of Moyland Wood. The day of Feb 20th was spent with preparations for the attack on Moyland Wood. Brigadier E.R. Suttie, who had replaced Brigadier Stanley Todd in command of the divisional artillery, prepared an elaborate fire plan involving medium and field artillery plus mortars, anti-tank guns, machine-guns and the tanks of the Sherbrooke Fusiliers (27th Cdn Arm Regt). Gregory and Lieutenant-Colonel Lockhart (Lockie) R. Fulton, DSO, ED, the 26-year-old Commanding Officer of the Winnipeg Rifles, devised a plan to clear the eastern end of the wood combining Wasps with tank support and air attacks.

    On 21 Feb at 1000 hrs the attack went in. Each of the two lead companies kept three Wasps forward with three in reserve ready to leap frog forward when fuel for the flame was exhausted. This continuous support boosted the morale of the assaulting troops while breaking the will of the enemy. The weather had sufficiently cleared to allow for rocket-firing Typhoons to support the attack. They flew approximately 100 sorties against the enemy machine gun and mortar posts. They too helped seal off approaches and escape routes. Inside Moyland Wood the fighting continued to be bitter, with mounting casualties from heavy German machine-gun fire and shells bursting in the treetops. Or as the Bde's War Diary grimly stated: "Very determined paratroopers resisted the advance, which kept the POW count down pretty low, but has kept the German POW grave diggers plenty busy burying their comrades".

    For further details of the operation of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles see the article of LtCol (Retd) Norm Donogh "Today In Military History - Moyland Wood 18 Feb 45".

    21 Feb 45.png

    014a.jpg
    The wooded ground at the western end of area #7a was the objective of the morning attack by 'B' and 'D' Coy. With the direct fire support provided by Sherman tanks of the Sherbrooke Fusiliers, which had laboriously worked their way forward over the boggy forest rides, the infantry managed to gain the objective; 'D' Coy was on the objective at 10:35 hrs, 'B' Coy, which encountered some more opposition, had its two leading platoons on the objective by 10:45 hrs. In this attack Lt. Bob Gannon of 'D' Company was killed; Lt. J.M. Millespie and Lt. F. Marlyn of 'B' Company were wounded. The picture was taken from the forest edge of wood #5, view towards the north, with on the right an outbuilding of the Bergkath Farm. Beyond the farm and at the back of the wood the ground drops abruptly.

    037a.jpg
    Along the northern edge of the Moyland Wood the ground drops abruptly and gives way to the flat, waterlogged ground that leads up to the Rhine River.

    053a.jpg
    Another view of the flat ground to the north of the Moyland Wood. This picture was taken at the Langenhorst Farm with a view to the west. The paratroopers, that were expelled from the high ground near Bergkath Farm, made a desperate, but futile attempt to escape across this open ground towards Moyland Castle (on the right, not visible on this picture). Many were cut down by small arms fire from the Canadians, only few escaped. What was once an open space behind Bergkath Farm has been planted with pine trees, which clearly stand out among the surrounding vegetation.

    034a.jpg
    At 11:00 hrs the Winnipegs started the eastwards advance through the forest, with 'A' and 'C' Coys attacking abreast. Unfortunately the heavily contested central part of the Moyland Wood - C sector in the 7 Bde report - has been completely excavated for sand extraction in the post-war years. One of the hottest fights took place in this area, when the depleted 'C' company, under Major C.S. Platts, assaulted an enemy strongpoint with the aid of flamethrowers. Of the 200 paratroops reported here, only 5 were taken out alive. Today a big water-filled quarry, in the middle of the forest, is all that is left.

    040a.jpg
    Beyond the quarry the pine covered ground climbs up to 'Hill 30' - wood # 9 in D sector of the 7 Bde report. Though a narrow strip of woods, this part of the forest gives an impression of the difficult terrain over which 'A' and 'C' Companies, and the supporting WASPs, had to advance. D sector was finally cleared by 1330 hrs, three and a half hours after the beginning of the battle. German paratroopers seen running east out of the woods were shot up by tank fire. Canadian losses, however, also were severe. 'C' Coy had two officers and approximately 40 men left, while 'A' Coy had no officers and 25 men left (all four officers in 'A' Company were put out of action: Lt. P.E. Walsh and Lt. K.P. Pritchard were killed and Capt. J.R. Morgan, the company commander, who was hit by a sniper, and Lt. Harry Badger both were wounded). The picture was taken at the foot of hill 30 with a view to the west. Part of one of the buildings of the garbage transfer station is vaguely visible through the trees. Around noon, 'B' Coy of the Winnipeg Rifles, was relieved by a company of the Reginas and concentrated in the area behind both companies (B2).

    Moyland Wood.png
    View of the Moyland Wood from the southeast. The middle part of the wooded high ground, labeled #8 in the 7 Bde report, nowadays has been completely excavated, which has changed the contour of the forest area. There now is a dip, where once there was a rise in the ground.

    022a.jpg
    The last part of Moyland Wood, little more than a tapered, narrow spur, covered with trees, marked as wood #10 in sector E by the 7th Bde report. Behind the trees, again, the ground drops abruptly (see next picture). This area was the objective of 'D' Coy of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles. After it had been relieved by the Reginas at the Bergkath Farm, 'D' Coy moved forward south of the Moyland Wood, along the road, and at 1400 hrs, with the help of three tanks, cut into the wood up the west boundary road of E sector (D2). The eastern end of Moyland wood was heavily mined with anti-personnel and anti-tank mines, which caused a lot of casualties. The houses on the right of the picture, situated in sector F of the 7 Bde Report, were full of the enemy paratroopers with machine guns. Mines laid across the exits from the wood prevented the tanks to effectively support the infantry to capture the houses. One blew up on a mine and when the others withdrew, the paratroopers launched several counterattacks from the houses against the forward positions of 'D' Coy. They also kept the wooded area under constant mortar and small arms fire. It was during these actions that the awards, mentioned in post #16 below, were won by the members of 'D' Coy. When the position was finally consolidated 'D' Coy's strength was three officers and approximately 50 men, 'B' Coy also was reduced to two officers and approximately 50 men.

    055a.jpg
    Same sector as the previous photograph, but now with a view from the northwest. The elevated wooded ground on the right forms the eastern tip of the Moyland Wood. To the left is the Hufsche Kath Farm which housed the CP of the I./18 FJ Regt, which was responsible for the defence of Moyland Wood. The last sector of the Moyland Wood was defended by two machine guns and riflemen in pits.

    Moyland Wood 012a.jpg
    Members of the BFTour group moving out of the forest toward the Langenhorst Farm, from there we walked back to the Moyland Castle for a debrief. It took us about 15 minutes to reach the castle on foot. How much longer had it taken the Canadians and at what a price ...

    The Winnipegs battle for Moyland Wood as seen by the Ops Log of 7 Brigade:

    Moyland Wood RWR 1a.jpg Moyland Wood RWR 2a.jpg Moyland Wood RWR 3a.jpg

    On British Pathe I found this film reel, taken at Calcar. It also depicts a scene of German trench systems, complete with dugouts, that could well have been within the Moyland Wood. The ground is still littered with fallen German soldiers. Still:

    Moyalnd Wood.jpg

    For the film reel see:"Invasion Scenes - Europe"
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2018
  15. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    Speaking of the price of Freedom; a link to an interview with Harold Prout, who was a Bren gunner in one of the WASPs in support of the Winnipegs on 21 Feb 45 (reply # 15): An Error Has Occurred! or Canuck's http://www.ww2talk.c...-sacrifice.html

    brencarrier_wijkstraat_GROOT.gif
    Canadian WASP MK II (C): Little bigger than a pick-up truck, the tracked carrier was open and had a crew of three. In the front seats were a driver and the flame gun operator. In the back was a man armed with a Bren gun to protect the rear, and trained to take over either of the front seats should one of those men be hit.

    carrier23.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2016
  16. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    Awards won by the Winnipeg Rifles in the Moyland Wood

    - Major Latimer Hugh Denison - Distinguished Service Order (DSO)

    On the 21st of February 1945, "D" Company of The Winnipeg Rifles, commanded by Captain (Acting Major) Latimer Hugh Denison was ordered to capture the high ground which is thickly wooded and overlooks Moyland Germany to the northeast. This attack was quickly pushed home despite heavy defensive fire put down by the enemy and the few that were left alive withdrew.

    Later in the day, "D" Company was ordered to pass through "C" Company to seize the high ground at the eastern tip of the wood. This required a 1000-yard advance through an extremely thick wood which was being subjected to the full weight of the enemy's fire. Casualties amongst Major Denison's men were heavy but, ceaselessly moving from platoon to platoon, he kept control of his company and, by his own personal courage, inspired his men to go on. Machine-gun fire from prepared positions on the hill feature was intense but, by skilfully manoeuvring his men, he got his own depleted company into an assaulting position and stormed the hill top with he himself leading.

    During the consolidation phase, they were counter-attacked twice by the enemy, both of these attacks were successfully beaten off with heavy casualties to the Germans. When the enemy were seen forming up for a third attack, Major Denison, from the crest of the hill and in full view of the enemy, personally sited and directed the fire of a troop of tanks which had come up in the meantime. The defensive fire brought down by the company and the tanks quickly broke up the enemy attack and they withdrew.

    By his initiative, leadership, courage and offensive spirit, Major Denison was able to inspire his men to hold their hard-won objective, thus securing the left flank of the brigade.

    Major Latimer Hugh Denison was later killed in action on 30 March in the Rhine bridgehead at Emmerich: CWGC - Casualty Details.

    - Lieutenant George Galt Aldous - Military Cross (MC)

    On the 21st of February 1945, Lieutenant George Galt Aldous was commanding 16 Platoon, Royal Winnipeg Rifles. The battalion had been ordered to capture a large wood southeast of Moyland Germany, this area being held by a large number of fanatical young paratroopers who had resisted all previous attempts to dislodge them.

    Number 16 Platoon was the leading platoon of "D" Company and, throughout the 1000 yard advance through the woods to their objective, was under heavy machine-gun and shell fire. The courage, leadership and coolness displayed by Lieutenant Aldous quickly carried his men to their objective. He personally accounted for one machine-gun post en route, which was firing on his platoon from a flank.

    While the platoon was consolidating, the enemy counter-attacked and overran his forward section. Gathering up his reserve section, Lieutenant Aldous rushed forward and, inflicting heavy casualties on them, drove the enemy off. During this, he was wounded and temporarily blinded by an egg grenade. This did not deter him, however, and he reorganized his platoon under heavy machine-gun and mortar fire in time to beat back a second counter-attack, thereby restoring the situation.

    Had this counter-attack been successful, it would have jeopardized the battalion position and it was only through Lieutenant Aldous' bravery, coolness and quick thinking that the men of his platoon were kept togetherand so prevente this flank from being penetrated.

    - Rifleman Mervin Frank Milson - Military Medal (MM)

    On 21 February 1945, in the attack of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles on the woods south-east of Moyland Germany, Rifleman Mervin Frank Milson displayed exemplary courage and devotion to duty.

    "D" Company, Royal Winnipeg Rifles, to which Rifleman Milson was attached as a stretcher bearer, had the task of securing the eastern tip of the woods, which contained a number of enemy paratroopers. During the fierce fighting that followed, Rifleman Milson noticed two of his comrades lying wounded in a clearing that was being swept by machine-gun fire and exploding rifle grenades. He immediately ran out to their assistance and was himself struck by a bullet which passed through his helmet and creased his scalp. Just then, the enemy launched a counter-attack but, undeterred, this soldier ran on and, seizing the men by their collars, succeeded in dragging them back into our positions where he dressed their wounds. Rifleman Milson was then ordered to the Regimental Aid Post for treatment. He refused to be evacuated and returned to his company where he continued to succour his wounded comrades.

    His gallant action undoubtedly saved the lives of two wounded men and his courage was an inspiration to all ranks of the battalion and was worthy of the highest traditions of this Regiment end the Canadian Army.


    GPO's son said: "These must have been some pretty hard and couragious men advancing across those open fields against hidden defended positions"

    There is not a single doubt about the commitment of these infantrymen, their performance was outstanding, heroic. Unfortunately, this cannot be said of the operational control of this battle (Bde and up). The enemy strength and quality, and the difficulties of forest fighting initially were seriously underestimated, resulting in ill coordinated attacks and culminating in the wipe out of an entire company of the Cdn Scottish on the 19th. The ordinary footsloggers, as usual, paid the price, no amount of medals ever can compensate for that. IMO this in particular forms the tragedy of Moyland Wood.

    veritablea196608.jpg
    Picture of infantrymen of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles in a Buffalo amphibious vehicle taking part in Operation VERITABLE en route from Niel to Keeken, Germany; February 9, 1945. Unaware of the severe fighting that lay ahead of them at Louisendorf and Moyland Wood (courtesy Canadians in Germany - Canada at War)

    In its six day action the Regina Rifles suffered a total of 220 casualties, of which 26 killed, and 19 reported missing in action (of which 18 POWs); in the same period the Winnipeg Rifles had 49 fatalities (of which 25 at Louisendorf); the Canadian Scottish, up till 21 Feb, lost 38 men KIA (an unknown number, probably 60+ were taken prisoner, and were listed as MIA). In all, losses of the 7th Cdn Bde for this period are given as 485 men, of which 113 KIA and at least 79 MIA/POWs. In addition, many cases of battle exhaustion were also added to the huge list of casualties.
    Moyland Wood also took its toll from the 46th Bde (15 Scottish Div). Between 15 and 17 Feb, the Bde's fatal casualties were: 26 men KIA for the 9th Cameronians; in its midnight attack, the 10 HLI lost 16 men KIA; while 9 men of the 7th Seaforth Highlanders lost their lives. Thus bringing the total of fatal casualties for the 46 Bde to 51 men.

    The German losses cannot be established with certainty. At the local cemetery of Calcar 243 war dead are interred. Many fallen from the Moyland - Bedburg area found a final resting place at the larger Donsbrüggen War Cemetery near Cleve (2300+ war dead) or at the Weeze War Cemetery (2000+ war dead).
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2017
  17. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    GPO's son said: "These must have been some pretty hard and couragious men advancing across those open fields against hidden defended positions"

    There is not a single doubt about the commitment of these infantrymen, their performance was outstanding, heroic. Unfortunately, this cannot be said of the operational control of this battle (Bde and up). The enemy strength and quality, and the difficulties of forest fighting initially were seriously underestimated, resulting in ill coordinated attacks and culminating in the wipe out of an entire company of the Cdn Scottish on the 19th. The ordinary footsloggers, as usual, paid the price, no amount of medals ever can compensate for that. IMO this in particular forms the tragedy of Moyland Wood.

    In its six day action the Regina Rifles suffered a total of 220 casualties, of which 26 killed, and 19 reported missing in action (of which 18 POWs); in the same period the Winnipeg Rifles had 49 fatalities (of which 25 at Louisendorf); the Canadian Scottish, up till 21 Feb, lost 38 men KIA (an unknown number, probably 60+ were taken prisoner - MIA). In all, losses of the 7th Cdn Bde for this period are given as 485 men, of which 113 KIA and at least 79 MIA/POWs. In addition, many cases of battle exhaustion were also added to the huge list of casualties.
    Moyland Wood also took its toll from the 46th Bde (15 Scottish Div). Between 15 and 17 Feb, the Bde's fatal casualties were: 26 men KIA for the 9th Cameronians; in its midnight attack, the 10 HLI lost 16 men KIA; while 9 men of the 7th Seaforth Highlanders lost their lives. Thus bringing the total of fatal casualties for the 46 Bde to 51 men.

    The German losses cannot be established with certainty. At the local cemetery of Calcar 243 war dead are interred. Many fallen from the Moyland - Bedburg area found a final resting place at the larger Donsbrüggen War Cemetery near Cleve (2300+ war dead) or at the Weeze War Cemetery (2000+ war dead).

    A search on Geoff's Search Engine results in the following casualties for the Regina Rifle Regiment (16 - 20 Feb 1945):

    001 APPLEBY FA L/74600 - 16/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    002 ARMSTRONG WD L/27753 - 16/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    003 BOEHM J L/74439 - 17/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    004 BRESSETTE RB B/137917 - 19/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    005 CANNON WA F/9541 - 16/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    006 CHABLUK M H/20671 - 18/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    007 EVANS DJ L/155546 - 18/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    008 FULLER CR L/106210 - 19/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    009 GALLANT GJ F/56139 - 18/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    010 GATZKE KH L/60821 - 18/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    011 GUSTILOV W L/103884 - 18/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    012 JEFFERSON RM H/103882 - 16/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    013 KADMAN JA H/10789 - 19/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    014 KOLESAR KA H/103237 - 16/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    015 KOWALCHUK W L/154351 - 18/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    016 LANGTON ML B/89455 1ST BN 16/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    017 MCKAY M L/106584 - 19/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    018 MOLOSKI HT L/107950 - 17/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    019 MOORE J K/73814 - 16/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    020 PARKER WL G/60786 - 16/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    021 PARKER FC K/1472 - 19/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    022 REAMBEAULT RD K/441 - 19/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    023 RYCKMAN ST L/55332 - 19/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    024 SEGUIN JA C/101020 - 16/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    025 THOMPSON RL L/17230 1ST BN 18/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    026 WREN WJ K/4188 - 16/02/1945 REGINA RIFLE REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.

    The Royal Winnipeg Rifles casualties for the Moyland Wood action were (20 - 22 Feb 1945):

    001 BUCHAN JK A/59193 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    002 DAHL GE M/1462 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    003 DONALDSON A M/107121 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    004 DORSCH R M/51066 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    005 DOW RH H/10159 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    006 FOSTER WJ B/148985 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    007 GAMMON RR - - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    008 GARDINER MJ H/41092 - 20/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    009 KAVANAUGH GH M/8420 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    010 MASON D H/103845 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    011 MCCURDY AC B/155438 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    012 MCINTYRE JJ C/123484 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    013 NORDVALL GA H/9464 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    014 ORMISTON WD - - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    015 PETE M L/108299 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    016 PITWANAKWAT AL B/115847 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    017 PRITCHARD KP - - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    018 PURDY FW B/149319 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    019 QUOVADIS GT K/52428 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    020 REID GJ M/105999 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    021 RICHARDS TB B/143388 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    022 RICHARDSON GL C/121292 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    023 SCHEIDEL NP L/154146 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    024 TROJANOSKI KS K/3141 - 22/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    025 TURNER CA H/9159 - 21/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.
    026 WALSH FE - - 20/02/1945 ROYAL WINNIPEG RIFLES, R.C.I.C.

    The Canadian Scottish had the following casualties during the fight at Slaughter Hill (17 - 22 Feb 1945):

    001 BLACK AA G/47216 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    002 COLMAN P K/38067 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    003 COLUCCI AS C/122303 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    004 DIEHL RJ H/1807 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    005 DUPUIS LJ G/47255 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    006 ELAM HG P/7549 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    007 FLEBBE RH K/54375 - 20/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    008 FRASER JA K/54857 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    009 GOGAN FF M/7743 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    010 GORDON JR M/105441 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    011 GOSSELIN C C/64686 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    012 HERRMANN E K/4351 - 20/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    013 KUTCHER J K/62793 - 20/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    014 LOUIE SC K/3195 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    015 LUDLOW RG K/683 - 20/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    016 MACDONALD NF K/197 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    017 MACKELLAR JD A/33147 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    018 MALONEY T D/144895 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    019 MARTINDALE AE K/2597 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    020 MARTY AI K/46977 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    021 MCLELLAN JG K/1809 - 20/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    022 MCMAHON MJV C/73356 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    023 MCWILLIAM JA K/4550 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    024 MOTION IR K/1367 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    025 MULLINS HT - - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    026 NADEAU CE M/100265 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    027 NEWMAN CS M/104929 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    028 PEACOCK PE K/45156 - 21/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    029 ROBERTSON MD K/54630 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    030 ROSS P B/112945 - 20/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    031 SHEARING RR K/46388 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    032 STEFAK P K/2877 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    033 STUART PA B/41158 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    034 VAN IDOUR F K/46233 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    035 VOSHELL EJ K/3452 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    036 WARNER HL K/42065 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    037 WESTBROOK WG K/2583 - 19/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
    038 WHITTEN H B/126411 - 18/02/1945 CANADIAN SCOTTISH REGIMENT, R.C.I.C.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2017
    gpo son likes this.
  18. dryan67

    dryan67 Senior Member

    Fine work and top-notch photos.
     
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  19. gpo son

    gpo son Senior Member

    Indeed Stolpi the Pheonix doth rise from the ashes in its splendor. Your visuals are exceptional as always maybe bettter in version 2.0. I still cant imagine anyone crossing those fields into that firestorm. never mind surviving. Well done.
    Matt
     
    stolpi likes this.
  20. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    It's probably because of the bright weather. The old pictures were better in that they met the weather conditions at the time of the battle: a low ceiling and a dripping, muddy forest.
     

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