UK Bomb Damage. (Still visible now)

Discussion in 'United Kingdom' started by raf, Jul 12, 2006.

  1. Wills

    Wills Very Senior Member

  2. 43rdrecce

    43rdrecce Junior Member

    Though not as visible as it used to be because of our shamefully crumbling railway infrastructure, is this pock marked bridge stonework just outside Landore Engine Shed Swansea, where my old Dad used to work.

    The bomb fell in the shed entrance on 10th August 1940 one of 31 bombs dropped in the surrounding area. The splinter damage to this stonework was never repaired. One of the few visible signs of the bombing left in Swansea.

    Not very exciting I know, but it will soon be forgotten.....

    Regards

    Paul

    http://i275.photobucket.com/albums/jj300/tocemma/WW2talk%20images/bombdamageLandore.jpg
     
  3. JoeBlake1

    JoeBlake1 Junior Member

    Hi everyone, my family lived in the Leyton area from the 1890s until the 1970s when we moved to Australia.
    During the war my Nan & Grandad lived at no. 64 Grosvenor Rd, an L shaped street. On Friday the 30th June 1944 my dad who was 18 at the time and recently called up into the army was home on leave (Grandad was away in the Navy and my uncle Bob was overseas with the 56th Recce) when they heard the unmistakeable sound of a V1 (Doodlebug) overhead.
    When they heard the engine cutout they decided to head out into the Anderson shelter where they waited for the explosion.
    The V1 landed at the end of their street in the corner of the L, not more than 100m away. It flattened all the houses in the vicinity and damaged many more in the surrounding streets. When my Nan and Dad left the shelter they looked at their house and all the windows, dooors and roof had been blown off. My Nan apparently said, "Oh no, what's your father going to say?" My dad replied with, "It weren't our bloody fault".
    Dad spent the rest of the day and night digging through the rubble assisting with the search for survivors.
    I have attached an interesting document I found among my Nan's papers after she passed away.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. clive_t

    clive_t Member

    One location close to my heart is Tyler Street in Bristol - one side is about 20 houses of 19th Century origins, the other side where my grandfather lived as a child is now 6 semis of 1960s vintage.

    Bath has lots of areas where bomb splinter (and bullet ricochet) damage are still evident from the so-called Beidekker raids. They also have an interesting dip on a patch of greenery not far from Royal Crescent, which was probably the intended target for the bomb that made the original crater.

    Clive
     
  5. Wills

    Wills Very Senior Member

    Looks like a gap on the end of the terrace .Where the garden is ? Tyler Steet.



    Tyler Street.jpg

    Tyler 2.jpg
     
  6. clive_t

    clive_t Member

    I think that was already there. That's the north side, which largely survived. The opposite side of the road is where the new houses are. I have a map segment of the street from the late 19th century, which I will post later on - can't access it at work unfortunately. You can use Streetview to virtually travel down that road and see the difference in the house sizes.

    Clive
     
  7. clive_t

    clive_t Member

    OK here's a map segment from around the 1890s:

    [​IMG]

    At the left edge you can see the gap between the houses that is shown in your photos. The yellow circle towards the right shows roughly where number 38 would have been, where my grandfather lived with his mother until he went off to the WW1 trenches with the Somerset Light Infantry. The only original bit left on the south side now is the corner property at the left side.

    Here's the house, with my great grandmother standing in the doorway around 1914 (it was a shop!):

    [​IMG]


    Sorry, I see you already used Streetview to get the pictures, I couldn't make that small print out on my phone!

    Clive
     
  8. bargeman

    bargeman Junior Member

    THE LAST AIR RAID OF THE WAR IN UK

    the last air raid of the war was on the 17 march 1945 when a lone plane attacked people leaving the savoy cinema house in HULL
    however there was a v1 and v2 attack after this date
    The national picture House in HULL was bombed in 1941 it is the last remaining civilian bomb ruin still in existence. in Britain

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Wills

    Wills Very Senior Member

    History at it's best!
     
  10. AMWright

    AMWright Member

    I couldn't see any mention of this yet. Plenty of bomb damage still visible to the Tate Britain Gallery in London on Atterbury Street.

    You can read about the raid on 16th September 1940 when the gallery was hit and see images of the damage here - Archive Journeys: Tate History | The War, Bomb damage | Tate

    Ash
     
  11. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    THE LAST AIR RAID OF THE WAR IN UK

    the last air raid of the war was on the 17 march 1945 when a lone plane attacked people leaving the savoy cinema house in HULL
    however there was a v1 and v2 attack after this date
    The national picture House in HULL was bombed in 1941 it is the last remaining civilian bomb ruin still in existence. in Britain

    [​IMG]


    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/ww2-news-articles/22121-last-bombsite-redeveloped.html
     
  12. bargeman

    bargeman Junior Member

    in relpy for bombed damage l have just posted a photo showing the only bombed site still standing which is in the city of HUll it is the national picture house and a group are trying to save it from been demolished
     
  13. blair-boyd

    blair-boyd Junior Member

    CL1 likes this.
  14. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

  15. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    It's more than very very good - Thats some dam fine work as you would say :)
     
  16. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    He's a member here, I'm sure.
    That page could inspire a whole new genre of really high quality nerdism.
     
  17. Paul Reed

    Paul Reed Ubique MOD

    I've been raving about it on Twitter for ages and he is a member here.
     
    von Poop likes this.
  18. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Many of us know the fine blog already, but since June I see he's done several other posts under the 'Bomb Craters' heading:
    PillBlogs

    Great stuff.
     
  19. gaspirator

    gaspirator Member

    Paul put a heads-up to this on Twatter.
    As he hasn't yet passed it on here, I am, 'cos it's just very very good:
    PillBlogs: Bomb craters (7) - 'bouncing' bomb scars cemetery

    It's more than very very good - Thats some dam fine work as you would say :)

    Thanks very much guys - glad you like it!

    I've been raving about it on Twitter for ages and he is a member here.

    Thanks (as usual) for all your raving Paul! Unfortunately, I don't spend as much time on Twitter as I could.

    I do pop on WW2Talk pretty much every day, but am very much a lurker - time constraints mean I don't get to contribute very often.

    That page could inspire a whole new genre of really high quality nerdism.

    Not strictly bomb damage, but an early example of nerdism with a shot-up pillbox in Kent: PillBlogs: Pillbox ballistics (2)

    My 'Bomb Craters' series can be accessed from here: PillBlogs
    It was meant to only last for four parts, but the more I researched, the more came to light, so there's still new depths of nerdism being plumbed...

    - Pete
     
  20. bozzlehead

    bozzlehead Junior Member

    VI crater in Harold Lodge park Elm Park Hornchurch , Sept 44 I believe . Also cannon /machine gun strafing damage on tile surface of south entrance of Blackwall tunnel London. This may have been eliminated by now as I have not been in UK for some time ?
     

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