The sartorial elegance of the British officer on campaign

Discussion in 'General' started by Owen, Sep 28, 2012.

  1. idler

    idler GeneralList Patron

    Sometimes makes me wonder just what other kit was shipped over with the lend-lease stuff.

    Anything they could charge for, I suspect.
     
  2. idler

    idler GeneralList Patron

    Dapper?

    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=91786&stc=1&d=1348952768

    I don't think the compilers of 5 Div's history put too much effort into finding a good photo of their one-time GOC.
     

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  3. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    Now the women are in the act!


    edit:
    image deleted due to fact the subject is not
    1. British
    2. An Officer.
    3. On Campaign

    so there... :p
     
  4. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    THREE Chindit officers looking the business.


    Brigadier "Mad" Mike Calvert (left) gives orders to Lieutenant-Colonel Shaw, while Major James Lumley stands with M1 carbine under his arm, after the capture of Mogaung in Burma during the second Chindit expedition, June 1944.
    [​IMG]
    THE CHINDITS. © IWM (MH 7287)IWM Non Commercial Licence
     
  5. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    Now the women are in the act!


    edit:
    image deleted due to fact the subject is not
    1. British
    2. An Officer.
    3. On Campaign

    so there... :p

    Such a bureaucrat!
     
  6. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

    Passing interesting (if you like that sort of thing), those US 'doughnut' crash helmets actually came supplied with the early M3s. Sometimes makes me wonder just what other kit was shipped over with the lend-lease stuff.

    I think I remember reading that both the Lees and the Shermans for Russia shipped with a Thompson. If that's true I'll bet not a single one was still there when the crews got the tanks.

    Dave
     
  7. Orwell1984

    Orwell1984 Senior Member

    I think I remember reading that both the Lees and the Shermans for Russia shipped with a Thompson. If that's true I'll bet not a single one was still there when the crews got the tanks.

    Dave

    Perhaps the ones shipped with the Stuarts slipped through ...

    and here's the officer on campaign to make sure the spirit of the thread is maintained. :D
     

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  8. 51highland

    51highland Very Senior Member

    Amazed the horse hadn't been eaten by the time of this photo. Somewhere Germany 1945.
     

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  9. ceolredmonger

    ceolredmonger Member

    Apparently they were - the Russians sold off a load of mint wartime Thompsons about 6 years ago.

    Keith
     
  10. Andreas

    Andreas Working on two books

    Always liked the casual attire of Brian Horrocks. As for 'Von Thoma'? oh dear.

    Maybe nobody told him that THAT war had ended in 1918?

    As for the Scottish policemen standing behind the LM1000... The contrast to the UXO chap couldn't be greater.

    All the best

    Andreas
     
  11. Andreas

    Andreas Working on two books

    Libya, 1942.

    All the best

    Andreas
     

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    Chris C likes this.
  12. SDP

    SDP Incurable Cometoholic Patron

    Johnny Rosser and Campbell Crocket 3RTR 1944-45
     

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  13. chrisgrove

    chrisgrove Senior Member

    Where are their ashplants?

    Chris
     
  14. stolpi

    stolpi Well-Known Member

    [​IMG]
    Officers of 15th Scottish Division near Cleve, Febr 1945
     
  15. RemeDesertRat

    RemeDesertRat Very Senior Member

    Where are their ashplants?

    Chris

    ashplants? :confused:
     
  16. Wills

    Wills Very Senior Member

    'Heard in the middle of Soltau Germany - one lieutenant Iain Duncan Smith who was seen by the sergeant major wearing a fore and aft forage cap -something not worn by SG. Sah! Get that F*****g thing of your head - now Sir! The CO Lt Col Naylor looked on bemused.
     
  17. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    ashplants? :confused:

    The Green Flash - Distinctions,Traditions and Institutions


    During WW1 long sticks were often carried by officers. Such sticks came to have a new and greater use with the introduction of tanks, which often became ditched on the boggy, shell-battered ground of the battlefields, particularly in Flanders. Officers of the Tanks Corps used these sticks to probe the ground in front of their tanks, and often led them into action on foot, testing the firmness of the ground step-by-step as they went forward. The carrying of an ash plant by officers of the Regiment both on and off parade continues to this day. Of course, as a general rule of thumb some of the ash plants have a bigger knob on the end of it, and over the years one cannot but help to recall some of these!
     
  18. RemeDesertRat

    RemeDesertRat Very Senior Member

    Cheers Owen - I learn something new everyday on WW2Talk.
     
  19. Bernhart

    Bernhart Member

    wish i could remeber which book it was, during the fighting in the schedt a Canadian officer was being relieved by a scottish one, he described how slovenly he was dressed and how wonderfully natty the scottish one was
     
  20. SDP

    SDP Incurable Cometoholic Patron

    2 Lt Harry Dews, his Comet and friend on the German plain 1945
     

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