The Queen's Bays

Discussion in 'RAC & RTR' started by Gayda, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. Gayda

    Gayda Junior Member

    In my research I have discovered that my Dad was a trooper in the 145th Regiment RAC. However, I have just come across a tattered little Army Form X 202/A which appears to be Dad's release form. The puzzling part is that it has been signed by a Lt. Col. of the Queen's Bays. Can anyone tell me if this has any significance. :confused:
     
  2. RemeDesertRat

    RemeDesertRat Very Senior Member

    Dunno. but a member on here will know the answer I bet. Tom?
     
  3. BFBSM

    BFBSM Very Senior Member

  4. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Gayda -
    PERHAPS - the Lt.Col of the Queens Bays was the interviewing Officer for your Fathers release from the Army as everyone was interviewed and pronounced "EXEMPLARY
    CONDUCT : having just met each other five minutes before - so the significance of that event is just that - an interview

    So IF you could add some more details from his release documents - we MIGHT be able to add a few items BUT the whole story will be on his Service Records - NOT his release papers...

    Might even know your father - did he wear brown suit ...and a Black Beret .....?

    Cheers
     
  5. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Gayda

    In my research I have discovered that my Dad was a trooper in the 145th Regiment RAC. However, I have just come across a tattered little Army Form X 202/A which appears to be Dad's release form. The puzzling part is that it has been signed by a Lt. Col. of the Queen's Bays. Can anyone tell me if this has any significance. :confused:
    One of life's minor pleasures is when one reads a posting that asks a specific question to which you realise you can give a definitive answer.

    Have a look at the image below.

    This is just one part of my Army Records and is signed by an officer at Barnard Castle from where I received my Army discharge in 1947.

    The officer in question had never met me or seen me before, but he would have seen in my records this glowing testimony from Major Loopy Kennard who I had the pleasure of working for in my last year at Trieste and he obviously had just read the "reference" and copied it out.

    Game. Set & Match ?

    Ron
     

    Attached Files:

  6. chrisgrove

    chrisgrove Senior Member

    I think you will find that one's conduct sheet is consulted before a grading of 'exemplary' is given! We had a National Serviceman in my regiment who spent so long in the guardroom that he had actually served longer than a three year regular - I doubt he got 'exemplary'.

    Chris
     
  7. mprobinson

    mprobinson Junior Member

    145th RAC was disbanded at the end of 1944, so he was probably sent to another regiment as a replacement.
     
  8. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    It's also equally true that he spent the last months of the war in the Depot at Rieti being

    re-trained on Armoured cars then given a choice - Lancers in Austria - 44RTR in Greece - six months in the UK then Burma - I chose Austria.....wrong..as we were joined six months later when the bomb finished the Burma thing- by the men who chose the six months UK...aaarrrggghhh
    Still say final interview......
    Cheers
     

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