THE FORGOTTEN WAR. The China India Burma theatre.

Discussion in 'Burma & India' started by Ranger6, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. andy007

    andy007 Senior Member

    One of the comments on the photos that Sol posted yesterday of the 81st West Africa Division was by a guy who said he had done his dissertation on them. The comment is here Glango Gambi | Flickr - Photo Sharing! Do any of you have access to facilities that may have it?
     
  2. zahonado

    zahonado Well-Known Member

    I am gradually getting round to reading my fathers diary from 1943 (Lanc Fusiliers) and would be happy to scan bits if anyone is interested- there is quite a lot about mules and Calvert, plus many other names are mentioned.

    I also have copies of two books "Sunbeams like swords" by WF Jeffrey about white city and Mogaung , and "Burma Drop" byJohn Beamish, I haven't yet read them, but could scan relevant bits.
     
  3. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Hi zahonado,

    Two nice books there. You have chosen well with these books, especially as 'Burma Drop' is often very expensive to pick up, due to its 136 Force connections.

    I would be very interested in your father's diary in relation to any one mentioned as having been on the first Chindit operation in early 1943 February-June. Or having trained for Chindit action in 1942. I am building a personnel roll for these men and women.

    A couple of other forum members will be very interested as well, as they have direct 1944 connections. I recently looked at the LF's war diary at the National Archives for 1942. It is a very short document and simply noted their training exercises in India, some of which involved the Gurkhas if I remember correctly? I took photos of a few lists of officers and the resume of the month of December's activities.

    If you would be interested or want me to check if your father is mentioned, just let me know.

    Bamboo.
     
  4. zahonado

    zahonado Well-Known Member

    Bamboo- nothing really about the Ist Chindit op as far as I can see, but I will check again. There is a meeting with Calvert and Wingate and an american commander.Just from the end of 43 . it´s a shame as many of his books have been given away or gone to Oxfam. i just salvaged the ones that looked more personal.Thanks for the offer but think it´s before his time-seemed to have been in some other unit.
     
  5. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Bamboo- nothing really about the Ist Chindit op as far as I can see, but I will check again. There is a meeting with Calvert and Wingate and an american commander.Just from the end of 43 . it´s a shame as many of his books have been given away or gone to Oxfam. i just salvaged the ones that looked more personal.Thanks for the offer but think it´s before his time-seemed to have been in some other unit.


    Thats no problem, thanks for looking. Every now and then when I read a book or war diary from later than 1943, I occasionally get a mention like " today we had training with Lieut. Smithers-Brown, who was on he first trip".

    Thats the sort of thing I'm always on the look out for.

    Thanks again.

    Bamboo.
     
  6. wtid45

    wtid45 Very Senior Member

  7. Warlord

    Warlord Veteran wannabe

    If someone thinks that what I'm about to post deserves its own thread or anything like that, please feel free to move it somewhere else.

    A while ago, Bamboo43 and I got into a short exchange of opinions on good ol' Gral. Joe Stilwell, a.k.a Vinegar Joe:

    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/345807-post163.html

    I began that post referring to the inhumane, political use he made of both the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional) - the famous Merrill's Marauders - and of the Chindits, something that together with my shallow knowledge about his stormy years in Chiang Kai Shek's court, has always made think about him as not exactly the best suited choice for a military leader. His description by Eric Morris in "Guerrillas in Uniform" as a "...Geriatric general called Stilwell, who possessed an abundance of evil intent and little military talent by way of compensation...", only strengthens that perception.

    However, another quote, this time by the authors of "The Stilwell Papers", saying that "His American men worshipped him. The Chinese armies he trained and led would have gone through hell for him...", provides a counter-balance, and the missing ingredient for an I hope interesting discussion.

    Was he really such an unstable character, not worthy of a brave but peculiar international crusade? Or is this your usual WW2 anglophone melée over your common soldier, in which American generals win the conflict single-handedly, according to those west of New York and east of Los Angeles, and British brass does it likewise for all those born in Blighty?
     
  8. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    Another great set on the flickr.com. This time is about Japanese surrender in the South East Asia. Great photo of "The Auk" with Japanese sword, and also very pleased to see photo of Maj.Gen. W.A. Crowther, who led 89th Indian Brigade and later took 17th Indian Division from Maj.Gen. D.T. Cowan.

    Interservices Public Relations Directorate - Delhi, 1945 - a set on Flickr
     
  9. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Another great set on the flickr.com. This time is about Japanese surrender in the South East Asia. Great photo of "The Auk" with Japanese sword, and also very pleased to see photo of Maj.Gen. W.A. Crowther, who led 89th Indian Brigade and later took 17th Indian Division from Maj.Gen. D.T. Cowan.

    Interservices Public Relations Directorate - Delhi, 1945 - a set on Flickr

    Nice find sol,

    I was just reading about the Japanese surrender to the Allies today in Slim's "Defeat into Victory". Has that wonderful description of Itagaki's angry grimace just before he pressed down the wax seal on the surrender document.
     
  10. Drayton

    Drayton Senior Member

    I have an off shoot from my core research going at the moment. I am interested in info on the Friends Ambulance Unit that worked in China/Burma during WW2. These were American pacifist conscientious objectors, who volunteered for stretcher bearing duties and so on close to the frontline.

    Books on the subject would be of particular interest.

    Thanks.

    Bamboo.

    It is misleading to describe the FAU as "American pacifist COs". The FAU was founded in Britain, primarily for British COs, although it included some US and other overseas people.
     
  11. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    It is misleading to describe the FAU as "American pacifist COs". The FAU was founded in Britain, primarily for British COs, although it included some US and other overseas people.


    Thanks for putting me right with this Drayton, it was just something that caught my eye whilst researching another area.

    Steve.
     
  12. wtid45

    wtid45 Very Senior Member

    Thanks for putting me right with this Drayton, it was just something that caught my eye whilst researching another area.

    Steve.
    Steve, I have mention of the FAU at Mandalay Hill, somewhere just have to remember where:huh: then I will type it up.
     
  13. Pete Keane

    Pete Keane Senior Member

    Steve

    I am friends with some friends who are Quakers, I will ask them if there is any info.

    Pete
     
  14. wtid45

    wtid45 Very Senior Member

  15. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Came across this link while looking for Ramc info on general hospitals, apoligies if it has been posted already. XHospital Units in the China-Burma-India Theater of World War II


    I'm sure it hasn't been posted before, it has a great photo of 142 Hospital and the senior staff, this is where some of the survivors of Rangoon Jail were treated, soon after liberation.
     
  16. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Hi All,

    I came across the attached article this evening while reading an old edition of the Burma Star organisation magazine, Dekho!

    I thought it might be of interest or even useful to some of our members with a leaning toward the Arakan offensive during WW2.:)

    It is a tribute to AF Christison with a brief outline of his Army service career.

    Apologies for the quality of the images, the pages would not fold flat I'm afraid and the print is very faint.
     

    Attached Files:

  17. sol

    sol Very Senior Member

    Nice article about great men, thanks for sharing Steve. Only one correction: he took XV Corps in October 1943 not in June 1942 as article suggested.
     
  18. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Nice article about great men, thanks for sharing Steve. Only one correction: he took XV Corps in October 1943 not in June 1942 as article suggested.


    Glad you picked it up sol, it was with you in mind that I placed it on the forum.:D
     
  19. Hebridean Chindit

    Hebridean Chindit Lost in review...

    I'm still learning the ropes round here and I may have started a thread in the wrong place, considering this is the CBI area...

    OK, so my specifics are an overburgeoning interest in the events up to and surrounding "Blackpool" with a dangerous interest in the minutiae of what went on...

    As an example I'm dropping this in sort of where it belongs...?

    I was offered a citation about a 1st Cameronian by Enes which showed me something worth recording that has surprised me about "Blackpool" - although the original name ("Clydeside") was compromised in an open transmission it remained in use - even to post the fall...!

    My reply to Enes...

    You have provided me with something I consider to be quite significant – when I went through the Battalion diaries I noticed that the name “Clydeside” was still in use, significantly into the campaign, although history records it being dropped due to a signalling error. This document was signed by both Masters (111th) and Brennan (26 Column) on 29th May – the event took place on the 24th – what history records as “Blackpool” FELL on the 25th May – they were still calling it “Clydeside” after the event…

    Back to the depths of a deep trawl......
     
  20. Southern View

    Southern View Junior Member

    Hi, I'm new to this BB. I'm interested in WW2, my mother was a Wren, and I live in Chongqing, China. The city was a Flying Tigers base. Today there is Flying Tigers museum and across the road, The Stillwell Museum, which must have been the Headquarters building in the city. Joseph Stillwell was the Allied Commander of the CBI Theatre for a time.

    Given the antipathy that China feels towards the US and the West today it is quite remarkable that these two museums still exist and function.
     

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