The Falklands War

Discussion in 'Postwar' started by Drew5233, Nov 26, 2009.

  1. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

  2. KevinC

    KevinC Slightly wierd

  3. wowtank

    wowtank Very Senior Member

    From primary school at the time of the war.

    Rule Britannia

    Marmalade and Jam

    Fire crackers up the Argies ar** holes

    Bang bang bang.
     
  4. geoff501

    geoff501 Achtung Feind hört mit

    BBC Radio 4 20:00 tonight:

    Mike Thomson returns with Radio 4's investigative history series, examining documents which shed new light on past events.
    In the first programme of the new series, Mike investigates the role played by the French Government and defence industry during the Falklands War.
    30 years on, it's well documented that French President Francois Mitterrand was supportive of the British war effort - not least in the memoirs of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Yet Mike discovers papers which suggest there was a deep split within the French government.
     
  5. geoff501

    geoff501 Achtung Feind hört mit

    Worth a listen, From Radio 4's Broadcasting House, 26 Feb.:

    "We met two friends from the Falklands War who describe themselves as brothers. One took the Argentine surrender at Goose Green - the other fought against him."

    BBC - Podcasts - Broadcasting House

    podcast available for next 20 days. Item starts at 32:00
     
  6. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    We have several ex Para Veterans in our RBL Berlin Branch, at least two were at the Falklands and one was at Goose Green when their Commanding Officer, H. Jones was killed and later received the VC posthumously.

    Regards
    Tom
     
  7. STAN50

    STAN50 Senior Member

    I can remember the Falklands campaign being screened on the news constantly when it all happened.

    I have several documentaries recorded on VHS somewhere - one has interviews with various British soldiers including one who was close to Colonel H Jones when he was shot. The others are about Simon Weston - three I think about him.

    I also have read Simon Westons book 'Going Back' which is very good.


    A thing I've just remembered from one of the documentaries: a widow of one of the sailors from HMS Antlope I think it was, had his personal effects returned to her in a plastic bag and they were still wet. This added to her grief.
     
  8. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    I heard a rumour the other day that all the War Diaries will/could be disclosed this year-I bet there will be some interesting reading in them. I bet there will be no mention of mercenaries (assuming there really was) on the island though.
     
  9. STAN50

    STAN50 Senior Member

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong but at Chatham Dock Yard there is a submarine in a dry dock there and I'm sure that when I visited it - sometime ago now - there was knowledge of it being present in the Falklands Campaign?
     
  10. Mike L

    Mike L Very Senior Member

    Stan, the widow you remember was the Wife of the Captain of Atlantic Conveyor, sunk by an exocet with most of the Army Chinooks on board, hence the great problems with moving troops and equipment later in the campaign.
    I have the documentary on video somewhere - will try to find her name.
     
  11. Mike L

    Mike L Very Senior Member

  12. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

  13. Gibbo

    Gibbo Senior Member

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong but at Chatham Dock Yard there is a submarine in a dry dock there and I'm sure that when I visited it - sometime ago now - there was knowledge of it being present in the Falklands Campaign?

    The submarine at Chatham is HMS Ocelot. She was in the RN at the time of the Falklands, but she isn't in the list of vessels serving in the Falklands Task Force given in The Battle for the Falklands by Max Hastings and Simon Jenkins. Her sister HMS Onyx was part of the Task Force.

    Go Onboard HM Submarine Ocelot (1962), Cold War Submarine, Chatham, Kent
     
  14. Mike L

    Mike L Very Senior Member

    Onyx was part of the (now defunct) Historic Warships collection an Birkenhead several years ago and I went on board. I think she set the record for length of tour for the type (diesel electric) during the Falklands.
    Also at Birkenhead at the time was HMS Plymouth and the formal Argentinian surrender was apparently signed in her tiny officers mess.
    Not sure where these vessels are now.
     
  15. jerseyboy

    jerseyboy Junior Member

    I worked with a guy years ago who served down there with the task force, he was MI, he told me a story that when they were integrating the hard liners (non conscripts) and they wouldn’t talk, they used to get a platoon of Ghurkha soldiers to walk in the yard where they were kept start talking in Nepalese, laugh and point at them.

    After that they would tell them anything, the Gurkhas were truly feared by the Argentine troops, the stories from goose green had apparently filtered down and they would do anything to avoid them.
     
  16. Mike L

    Mike L Very Senior Member

    Watched 'The Great Falklands Gamble' (Channel 5) tonight. I thought it was good, although most of us probably knew about the cock-ups already. Interesting thoughts at the end about 'could we do it today?'.
    As far as I know the current strategy is based on not letting them in in the first place - greater forces in place - and ageing Argentinian equipment, especially aircraft.
    Another interesting One due Sunday, the Vulcan bombing mission.
     
  17. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    It'll soon be 30 years since those Argentine 'scrap metal workers' landed on South Georgia 19th March 1982.
    >> South Georgia
     
  18. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Watched 'The Great Falklands Gamble' (Channel 5) tonight. I thought it was good, although most of us probably knew about the cock-ups already. Interesting thoughts at the end about 'could we do it today?'.
    As far as I know the current strategy is based on not letting them in in the first place - greater forces in place - and ageing Argentinian equipment, especially aircraft.
    Another interesting One due Sunday, the Vulcan bombing mission.

    As you mentioned Mike - The real question should be 'Could the Argentians do it again?'
     
  19. Mike L

    Mike L Very Senior Member

    Let's hope not eh Andy ;)
     
  20. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Not a cat in hells chance mate.
     

Share This Page