The Essex Regiment 1929-1950 History

Discussion in 'British Army Units - Others' started by AussieNipper, Jan 5, 2012.

  1. gmyles

    gmyles Senior Member

    Hi Nipper.

    If there's anything about the 1/4 s short time in Greece in 44-45 I'd be very interested to see it.

    Regards

    Gus
     
  2. AussieNipper

    AussieNipper Member

    Hi Gus,

    There is quite a few pages on the 1/4 Essex in Greece (also in Italy prior, if you are interested). Since there is quite a bit of info, I will get on to photocopying them and sending them through to you as there is far too much to just summarise.

    All the best,

    Nipper
     
  3. Andreas

    Andreas Working on two books

  4. idler

    idler GeneralList Patron

    I believe it may have been Battle of Essex Wood.
    Would anyone have more info about this?

    Charlotte,

    Have you seen this thread?
     
  5. gmyles

    gmyles Senior Member

    Hi Nipper

    There's no rush, and there's no requirement for anything about Italy, just Greece would be brilliant.

    Thanks again

    Gus
     
  6. AussieNipper

    AussieNipper Member

    Hi Gus, here is (see attachments) the chapter of the 1/4 Essex in Greece as requested. Hope it can be of some use.


    Hi Nipper

    I would be very interested in the information relating to 1 Essex in Tobruk. At the link below you can find a combat report by 15th Panzer who had an encounter with them there

    Won't be long Andreas, getting around to it very shortly!

    All the best,

    Nipper

    P.S. Great find idler! Cheers!
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Varasc

    Varasc Senior Member

    Hi At Home Dad,

    The only officer I could find is a Captain S.E. Collier of "D" Company the 7th (Home Defence) Battalion, Essex Regiment. He is mentioned by name in a chapter called "The 7th and 30th (Home Defence) Battalions, The Essex Regiment". The chapter covers the two Battalion's history from their reformation from No. 8 Group N.D.C to their disbandment in 1942.

    I have yet to find a mention of the of the other names you posted, I will have a more thorough read and see what I can find.

    Regards,

    Nipper


    Dear Nipper,

    This is an excellent topic, excellent indeed. Thanks so much for sharing this precious, noticeable knowledge with us all. Very kind from you. :)
     
  8. .....book covers Regimental history from Inter-war/WW2/....Nipper
    Nipper
    Is there any mention of ‘Robert Edward Kenny Hebington’ during the inter war years ? Robert resided at 1 Gordon St Pembroke Dock. Aged 52when he died in 1941. The son of Mr & Mrs Hebington of Colchester he was in fact born at Gibraltar. Joined Army saw 18 yrs service in India. Severely wounded and gassed in the Great War he remained in the Army after and retired in 1935, whilst attached Essex Regt, having already served in English, Irish, Scotch and Welsh Regts. His family came to Pembroke Dock circa 1927. He joined local A.F.S. in 1939.
    Rgds
    Owen Ap Benfro
    Pembroke Military Headstones 1722 to 2008
     
  9. gmyles

    gmyles Senior Member

    Hi Nipper

    This is great stuff. Greece was not a nice place to be in 1944/45 and my father was one of the lucky ones who survived the siege of Athens.

    Many thanks for sharing.

    Regards

    Gus
     
  10. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

  11. AussieNipper

    AussieNipper Member

    Is there any mention of ‘Robert Edward Kenny Hebington’ during the inter war years ? Robert resided at 1 Gordon St Pembroke Dock. Aged 52when he died in 1941. The son of Mr & Mrs Hebington of Colchester he was in fact born at Gibraltar. Joined Army saw 18 yrs service in India. Severely wounded and gassed in the Great War he remained in the Army after and retired in 1935, whilst attached Essex Regt, having already served in English, Irish, Scotch and Welsh Regts. His family came to Pembroke Dock circa 1927. He joined local A.F.S. in 1939.

    Hi Owen, unfortunately I couldn't find any mention of Mr Hebington. I'm not sure which Batallion he was in, but in 1935 the 1st were in the Saar and the 2nd were just on their way to a deployment in Sudan after being in India.


    Hi Nipper
    This is great stuff. Greece was not a nice place to be in 1944/45 and my father was one of the lucky ones who survived the siege of Athens.

    Many thanks for sharing.

    Regards

    Gus

    It was no problem at all Gus, my pleasure. It looks like your dad was lucky, I'm just happy I could be of help, but all credit goes to Colonel Martin of course. My Grandfather, like many others, never talked about his experiences and its only now I'm starting to discover bits and pieces of his history.


    Anything you can add to this?

    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/general/37758-anthony-irwin-bef-officer-commando-glider-pilot-officer-military-cross.html#post418735

    Hi Andy, I found 2LT Irwin being mentioned by name and so are his actions leading up to the award of his MC. I'm not sure if it adds any extra info from what you already know from the previous thread, but I included it regardless.
    At about 6 p.m., the enemy reconnaissance of "A" Company's sector was repeated, but the A.F.V was engaged by the anti-tank platoon under 2/Lieutenant D G Calvert, who reported that it burst into flames after the third shot from the 25mm gun. Several enemy motorcyclists were hit, their machines were damaged and the crews forced to take cover in the woods. Covered by fire from one of his platoon posts, 2/Lieutenant A S Irwin, accompanied by Private C T V Clarke, then crossed the canal by rowing boat and made his way up to the damaged motor bicycles to return with two maps and a machine gun. Shortly afterwards several armoured cars appeared and were engaged, one car being put out of action. For this operation, 2/Lieutenant Irwin was awarded the Military Cross and Private Clarke the Military Medal
    The next day, on the 27th of May 1940, he left by truck to Dunkirk for evacuation.
     
  12. AussieNipper

    AussieNipper Member

    Hi Nipper

    I would be very interested in the information relating to 1 Essex in Tobruk. At the link below you can find a combat report by 15th Panzer who had an encounter with them there:

    Combat Report Panzer Regiment 8 for 29 Nov attack on Ed Duda « The Crusader Project

    Many thanks in advance for any help you can give.

    All the best

    Andreas

    Hi Andeas,

    This is all the info to do with the 29th attack on Ed Duda. (Sorry for the cut offs, new scanner and I'm still working out how to do single pages without creating black areas). Tobruk/Ed Duda is quite a long chapter, but the 29th attack is a very small portion. If you need anything else just feel free to let me know.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Andreas

    Andreas Working on two books

    Many thanks Nipper!

    This is very helpful. If there is anything on the preparation for the break-out, that would also be quite valuable (something on the training etc.)

    But in any case, I think this is the most important part!

    Great help, and thanks again.

    All the best

    Andreas
     
  14. PaulG72

    PaulG72 New Member

    HI,

    My Grandfather served with C. Coy 2/5 Battalion Essex Regiment during WW2 in the Middle East.

    He was Pte. A. J. Fox 6019796

    Just trying to find out anything relevant?

    All the best

    Paul G
     
  15. NCH

    NCH Member

    Hi, my dad was in the Essex in WW2. He mentioned he served in Egypt and Italy as a signal. His name was W.J.G. Halls and I believe he served 1940 - 1945 starting as a private and leaving as a second leftenant. Do you have any information at all that could help finding out where exactly he served, Thanks, Nick.
     
  16. idler

    idler GeneralList Patron

    If this is him, he's mentioned twice in the London Gazette:

    Commissioning

    Note on seniority

    And now you know he was commissioned into the Royal Signals and his service number: 278712 (though he'd have another one for his non-commissioned service). It's possible he was a signaller within an Essex battalion and was then recommended for a commission. For his full story you need to apply for his service records.
     
  17. minden1759

    minden1759 Senior Member

    NCH.

    If your father served in Italy in the Essex Regiment then he probably served in 1/4 ESSEX who were part of 5 Indian Brigade, 4 Indian Division.

    4 Ind Div fought in the Second and Third Battles of Monte Cassino between Feb-Apr 44. During the Third Battle, 1/4 ESSEX played a major role in defending The Castle on Point 195 and in trying to get 5 Indian Brigade up the front on Monte Cassino in order to capture the Monastery itself. It is quite a story.

    Did your father ever mention Monte Cassino?

    Regards

    FdeP
     
  18. minden1759

    minden1759 Senior Member

    NCH.

    Ignore me. If he was commissioned into R SIGNALS in Jul 43 then he would not have been with 1/4 ESSEX at Cassino.

    Regards

    FdeP
     
  19. NCH

    NCH Member

    Hi, great information. I can't get his service record yet as my step mother is still around (a little tension there!). He had a few stories he shared after a drink or two too many, but rarely spoke of the war. He did mention he was also in tanks and was with a gurhka regiment. He gave up serious drinking after his 21st birthday where apparently the guys lined up one of every drink at the bar and he had somewahat of a memory lapse, although at parade the next morning they talked of a naked guy beating up two MP's when he returned to barracks and somehow managed to stop at him during parade!! He also boxed for the army and said he was put in against a US marine who hit him once, knocked him over the ring and broke his ribs. There are a few other stories, but I'm not sure what may be childhood (or parental) embelishment.
     
  20. NCH

    NCH Member

    He did mention a monestry and also fishing in a lake using a hand grenade then scooping fish up to feed everyone, but I don't really know if this was at the same time. He also said at some point he was a seargeat (I think seargeant major) as he had a booming voice and was a big man (bigger than I) at 6' 2". He also talked of ordering a guy up a telegraph pole, but the guy refused three times as there were snipers around, so he went up, fixed the line, got down and promptly knocked the guy out.
     

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