The death of Groupement Mobile 100

Discussion in 'Postwar' started by Warlord, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. Warlord

    Warlord Veteran wannabe

    While reading "Street Without Joy", by Bernard B. Fall, I stumbled upon a chapter devoted exclusively to the short, heroic, but tragic story of Groupement Mobile - G.M. - 100, a French task force in South and Central Indochina, part of the CEFEO (Corps Expéditionnaire Francais en Extreme Orient) which was made up almost entirely of Korean War veterans, supplemented by battle-hardened Cambodians and Vietnamese, and equipped with its own artillery, armor and auxiliary units.

    Even though its members were top-of-the-line, if not elite, regular infantry, the outfit met a disastrous end within 10 months of its activation, suffering heavy casualties from day one, in a deadly never-ending string of ambushes by the commie Viet-Minh.

    I knew a little about G.M. 100 before getting my hands on this superb piece of military literature, but reading about it in depth makes me wonder: Which were the causes of such a hecatomb? Did they lie beyond the battlefield, in some far away place of a world recently and rudely awakened to a new struggle, the Cold War?
     
  2. Capt.Sensible

    Capt.Sensible Well-Known Member

    While reading "Street Without Joy", by Bernard B. Fall, I stumbled upon a chapter devoted exclusively to the short, heroic, but tragic story of Groupement Mobile - G.M. - 100, a French task force in South and Central Indochina, part of the CEFEO (Corps Expéditionnaire Francais en Extreme Orient) which was made up almost entirely of Korean War veterans, supplemented by battle-hardened Cambodians and Vietnamese, and equipped with its own artillery, armor and auxiliary units.

    Even though its members were top-of-the-line, if not elite, regular infantry, the outfit met a disastrous end within 10 months of its activation, suffering heavy casualties from day one, in a deadly never-ending string of ambushes by the commie Viet-Minh.

    I knew a little about G.M. 100 before getting my hands on this superb piece of military literature, but reading about it in depth makes me wonder: Which were the causes of such a hecatomb? Did they lie beyond the battlefield, in some far away place of a world recently and rudely awakened to a new struggle, the Cold War?

    Hello Warlord,

    I'm not sure I understand your questions in the last paragraph of your post. Are you specifically asking about GM 100 or is it a wider question about French post-colonial conflicts?

    Yrs

    CS:)
     
  3. Warlord

    Warlord Veteran wannabe

    I had a feeling in my gut that you were going to be the first one to answer... ;)

    Well, one of the reasons behind this thread was to explore the whole conflict, using as a guinea pig (to keep up with its tradition :huh:) the ordeal of G.M. 100. I´m fairly convinced that the reasons behind its demise, tactical, strategical and political, will apply to the entire war, and even to almost all conflicts of the early days of the Cold War.

    I already have my opinions on the affair, based on that excellent piece of reading that you recommended me (thanks again), but I would like to hear (read) the points of view of the experts out there, so as to draw a complete and fairly accurate picture.
     

Share This Page