The Blitz Around Britain 7th September 1940 onwards

Discussion in 'United Kingdom' started by CL1, Sep 16, 2015.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    Blitzkrieg, known more commonly as the Blitz, was a sustained period of bombing raids inflicted upon the British by the Nazis between 7 September 1940 and 21 May 1941.
    If you wander around London today you can still see the impact these raids had, albeit in an indirect way. Walk down many suburban streets in London and chances are you’ll see a conspicuous set of flats squeezed in between the Victorian terraces – these often mark the spot where a German bomb landed.
    In conjunction with the Joint Information Systems Committee and the University of Portsmouth, the National Archive has created an interactive map of all the bomb sites in the UK that took place during the Blitz.
    We’ve taken this publicly available data from the National Archive and, using HERE Data Lens – a toolkit that allows for data visualisation using our maps – created our own interactive map to illustrate the devastation caused by the relentless raids. Though other parts of the country were hit, London faced the brunt of it as you can see by the sea of markers below.

    http://360.here.com/2015/09/07/mapping-the-devastation-of-the-london-blitz-75-years-later/
     
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  2. Geho

    Geho Member

    On a similar line the Liverpool Echo had the diagram of all the hits in the city but more interesting was where the bombs were dropped all the way up to Southport.
     
    CL1 likes this.
  3. kopite

    kopite Member

    Yes, I saw that recently, very interesting. It looked like one dropped right on top of our old house in Crosby -). Previously I was under the impression that Bootle was about as far from the city centre as they had bombed, but the map shows it was considerably further afield than that.

    Here's a link to the article:

    http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/nostalgia/liverpool-blitz-animated-map-charts-9945979
     
  4. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    The Blitz | History of the Battle of Britain | Exhibitions & Displays | Research | RAF Museum

    Germany launched its bombing raids on British cities – the Blitz – on 7th September 1940 – ‘Black Saturday’, beginning with the London Docks. During this first phase of the Blitz, raids took place both day and night. German bombers attacked London every night but one between mid-September and mid-November. Birmingham and Bristol were attacked in mid-October.
     
  5. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    The Blitz Around Britain

    The 'Blitz' – from the German term Blitzkrieg ('lightning war') – was the sustained campaign of aerial bombing attacks on British towns and cities carried out by the Luftwaffe (German Air Force) from September 1940 until May 1941.

    The Blitz began on 7 September, 'Black Saturday', when German bombers attacked London, leaving 430 dead and 1,600 injured. London was then bombed for 57 consecutive nights, and often during daytime too. London experienced regular attacks and on 10-11 May 1941 was hit by its biggest raid. German bombers dropped 711 tons of high explosive and 2,393 incendiaries. 1,436 civilians were killed. However, this proved to be the last major raid until January 1943.

    While London was bombed more heavily and more often than anywhere else in Britain, the Blitz was an attack on the whole country. Very few areas were left untouched by air raids. In relatively small compact cities, the impact of a severe air raid could be devastating.

    From mid-November 1940, major provincial cities and industrial centres were targeted. In early 1941 another wave of attacks began, primarily against ports. Respite finally came from June when much of the Luftwaffe was directed against Russia and targets in the Mediterranean.

    In these nine months, over 43,500 civilians were killed. This is how the Blitz affected towns and cities across the United Kingdom.
     
  6. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    The Blitz | Bomb Incidents | West End at War
    From 7 September to 2 November - 57 consecutive nights - London was bombed without respite. The Luftwaffe conducted daylight raids on the capital until rising RAF fighter interception rates forced a shift to night attacks only (from 29 October). In the Blitz’s first month, 5,730 Londoners were killed and over 9,000 seriously injured. From 7 September to mid-November, an estimated 28,000 high explosive bombs and tens of thousands of incendiaries were dropped on London. 3,759 unexploded high explosive bombs (UXBs) had been dealt with in London by the end of September alone. In the event, poison gas attacks on London and other British cities were not carried out.The Luftwaffe eschewed the use of gas - on grounds of ineffectiveness and the likelihood of British reprisal in kind - although concerns over its potential persisted well into 1944.
     
  7. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

  8. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

  9. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    The Blitz Around Britain
    Coventry
    London
    Birmingham
    Bristol
    Southampton
    Sheffield
    Liverpool
    Manchester
    Cardiff
    Portsmouth
    Hull
    Plymouth
    Clydebank
    Belfast
     
  10. ARPCDHG

    ARPCDHG Member

  11. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

  12. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    Canterbury 9/9/40

    251 HOLLAND A - - 09/09/1940 CIVILIAN WAR DEAD
    252 HOLLANDS EG - - 09/09/1940 CIVILIAN WAR DEAD
    253 HOLLANDS DJ - - 09/09/1940 CIVILIAN WAR DEAD
     
  13. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

  14. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    Great Yarmouth

    186 RISING V - - 10/09/1940 CIVILIAN WAR DEAD
     
  15. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

  16. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    Southampton 12th September 1940
    249 WYLDE PH - - 12/09/1940 CIVILIAN WAR DEAD
     
  17. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

  18. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    The Palace was hit again on 13 September at around 11am, during the second of three daylight raids on London that day. A single German raider targeted the Palace with a stick of five high explosive bombs. Two of these hit the inner quadrangle, a third struck the Royal Chapel in the South Wing and the remaining two (one delayed-action) fell on the forecourt and on the roadway between the Palace gates and the Victoria Memorial. The explosions in the quadrangle ruptured a water main and blew out most of the windows on the southern and western sides. The interior of the Royal Chapel was lacerated. Four workers were injured; one later died. Several portraits were damaged in the Palace corridors and the red carpets were lightly covered by dust.

    King George VI and Queen Elizabeth were in residence at the time of the bombing - taking tea - but escaped unscathed. Congratulations on their safety poured in from around the Empire and beyond. After this attack, the Queen was prompted to express her solidarity with fellow Londoners, remarking: "I am glad we have been bombed. It makes me feel I can look the East End in the face".
    13 September 1940 | Buckingham Palace | Bomb Incidents | West End at War
     
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  19. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    13th September 1940
    Newport,Monmouthshire

    071 PHILLIPS M - - 13/09/1940 CIVILIAN WAR DEAD
    072 PHILLIPS MP - - 13/09/1940 CIVILIAN WAR DEAD
     
  20. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery

    14th September 1940
    Warrington,Cheshire


    136 TAYLOR WJ - - 14/09/1940 CIVILIAN WAR DEAD
    137 TAYLOR WJ - - 14/09/1940 CIVILIAN WAR DEAD
     

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