Sword Beach.

Discussion in 'NW Europe' started by Trux, May 4, 2012.

  1. Trackfrower

    Trackfrower Member

    Mike,

    This is amazing....

    With Reference to the Artillery,

    H-90 Wireless silence relaxed for command net bombardment sets

    H-90 to -50 Control check net and syncronise

    H-37 76Fld Regt starts ranging, A Troop only. Troop salvos 30 seconds. 1 gun smoke Fuse 57.
    Stand-by smoke B and F Troops.

    H-35 All Regt, Fire for effect. HE rate 3, 1 gun at 1 RPM smoke.

    H-5 All guns firing HE plus 300 yards

    H-4 Change to Charge 3

    H Hour Unload. Bombard until H+5

    Lead boat LCT331 with A Troop & Field Regt. &^ Field Regt to port and 33 Field Regt to starboard.

    0740 OPs, GPOs, ULOs and recce parties land.

    76 Field Regt FOO Capt. Jo Daniel, killed when LCP sunk

    33 Field Regt FOO also sunk, but rescued.

    7 Field Regt FOO Capt. Bruce directs fire from his LCP

    (any idea which LCPs these are?)
     
  2. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Trackfrower,

    Thank you for your kind comments and for your input.

    I can find some information on the LCPs, and I have some nice diagrams etc showing the run in. You are ahead of me again. I have a whole, and large, section dealing with the seaward events, from loading to landing. This will deal with all the craft involved. May be months before I get there but I can send you information by email attachment or on disc.

    More later. I am resting now. Several waves of LSTs are due to arrive off Sword soon.

    Mike
     
  3. Pak75

    Pak75 Member

    MIke and Arty

    Thank you very much for sharing this info with us.

    One qsn re 13/18th Hussars D-day losses: what are your souces?

    Many authors seem to have got the numbers wrong, starting with LF Ellis (Victory in the West) and ending with Rich Anderson's "Cracking HItler's Wall' (otherwise excellent in case he is lurking... :smile: )

    A and B DD squadron started with 20 tanks ea - carrying one spare each -and according to History of Regiment by Maj Charles Miller were organised on a 4 troop 4 tank basis with 4 in SHQ.
    A sqdn harboured with only 6 tanks fit, therefore 14 were lost or out of action. Diary of Major Wormald on Pegasus website http://www.pegasusarchive.org/normandy/rep1318hussars.htm says that A sqn lost 14 tanks on run into or on the beaches ( 9 swamped, 1 hit a mine, 3 were run down by LCTs and one more sunk after launching)

    B squadron had 10 fit at the end of the day - one DD tank in LCT 465 could not be offloaded because of damage to the ramp and two more lost to anti tank guns south of Benouville. This implies that 7 tanks could have been lost or damaged on the beaches. Only one is mentioned in Miller as being hit by shellfire.

    Just to complicate matters, WD of 13/18th Hussars does not mention that two Shermans Fireflies employed on LCT(A) as Concrete busters and crewed by 13/18 men eventually got to shore and one of each joined A & B squadrons, so we do not know if tank state in WD included these tanks - if it does, that means losses were even greater.

    Again cannot be sure if two tanks returned to UK are counted as casualties... but I am assuming they were.

    C squadron is a little more straight forward.
    Organised on an unusual 20 tank basis in 4 troops of 4 plus 4 in SHQ ( 3 SHermans + 1 Firefly per troop). Note Miller says 4 in SHQ..... perhaps someone has loading tables for C squadron? Tables I have seen have a total of 8 Sherman tanks in each LCT plus an ARV which fits with 20 tanks in C sqdn plus 4 in RHQ. Original 3 LCTS for C squadron were overloaded and two tanks from each LCT were put into a spare LCT on June 3.
    13 tanks reported fit at end of day, sqdn lost 2 tanks attacking Hillman with 2 more damaged and another three unaccounted for.

    Finally 1 tank of RHQ would not start in its LCT so was returned to UK.

    Therefore A and B squadrons seem to have had far higher losses on run in to beaches and on the beaches than previously thought. WD mentions 2 tanks from B sqdn being repaired next day so tank losses on beaches may be as high as 14 + 7 - 2 = 19 tanks total lost.



    Cheers

     
  4. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    Pak 75,

    Your knowledge exceeds mine on this matter I am afraid. The three subjects that have attracted the most attention for 70 years seem to be 13/18 Hussars, ARRE and 5 Royal Marine Support Battery. They are still a matter of debate. I have deliberately kept my accounts of these simple and hope others will expand on them.

    For 'C' Squadron,13/18 Hussars the original Landing Tables list the following:

    H + 45 Minutes.

    Queen White.
    Serial 210 is an LCT3 carrying
    6 Sherman III with 30 crew from 13/18 Hussars.
    2 Sherman Vc Firefly with 8 crew from 13/18 Hussars.
    1 Sherman III ARV with 4 crew from 13/18 Hussars.
    5 Porpoise stowed under, and towed by, above tanks.


    Serial 212 is an LCT4 carrying
    6 Sherman III with 29 crew from 13/18 Hussars.
    1 Sherman Vc Firefly with 4 crew from 13/18 Hussars.
    1 Sherman III ARV with 4 crew from 13/18 Hussars.
    1 Carrier Universal with 4 crew from 13/18 Hussars.
    5 Porpoise stowed under, and towed by, above tanks.
    1 man from ‘X’ Troop 27 Armoured Brigade Signals. Carried in a Sherman III tank of 13/18 Hussars.


    Serial 214 is an LCT3 carrying
    6 Sherman III with 30 crew from 13/18 Hussars.
    2 Sherman Vc Firefly with 8 crew from 13/18 Hussars.
    1 Sherman III ARVwith 4 crew from 13/18 Hussars.
    5 Porpoise stowed under, and towed by, above tanks.

    Serial 215 is an LCT4 carrying
    4 Stuart Light tanks from 13/18 Hussars.
    1 Carrier Universal from 13/18 Hussars
    1 M14 Halftrack from 13/18 Hussars
    23 men from 13/18 Hussars


    Queen Red.
    Serial 217 was an LCT4 carrying
    4 Stuart Light Tanks from 13/18 Hussars.
    1 Carrier Universal from 13/18 Hussars.
    2 M14 Halftrack from 13/18 Hussars.
    31 crew from 13/18 Hussars.

    As you say we know that these were changed. The precise nature of the changes is not clear to me.

    Details of losses is not an area I know much about, relying on the CAB account of 1 Corps on D Day plus what others have passed on to me.

    Mike
     
  5. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    SWORD BEACH.
    INTERLUDE 3.


    By H+360 minutes the assault brigades were ashore, although there was still some congestion on the beaches and at the exits. The falling tide did not allow more craft to land for six hours. While it was possible for craft to land on a falling tide, and even to beach and dry out, this was not thought wise in an assault. The rule was that everything, and everyone, should get off the beach as quickly as possible. Vehicles and personnel should move quickly inland and craft should quickly get back out to sea.

    The six hour pause in landings allowed the beach units to restore order. Remaining vehicles were directed off the beach, stranded or damaged vehicles were recovered, damaged and stranded craft were moved or marked by buoys and flags. More important there was now time to develop the exits that had been opened, to open more exits, to clear beach obstacles and clear mines from the areas inland.

    The greater part of 5 Beach Group was now ashore and working on the allotted tasks. The advanced parties of 6 Beach Group and 101 Beach Sub Area had begun their reconnaissance and were working on the Second Key Plan which allotted areas for the various tasks and units.

    In the meantime the LSTs which had launched DUKWs were waiting offshore to discharge vehicles onto Rhino Ferries and thus to shore. In fact this was a slow process because of the rough weather. All timings from here onwards are the time that ships and craft were to be ready to unload. They would seldom start to unload immediately and would require two Rhino trips to complete the task.

    Time to look at the work being done in developing the beach and preparing for the heavy traffic due to land on the second tide.

    Mike.
     
  6. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    SWORD BEACH
    DEVELOPING THE BEACH.

    BEACH EXITS.
    Initially eight beach exits were planned for Sword, each one with its own Breaching Team of AVREs and Flails. It is however difficult to tell which units were involved in opening each exit. The Breaching Teams succeeded in opening six gaps in the initial assault stage but these, and the remaining two, were opened as exits by a diverse group of units.

    - The Breaching Teams made initial gaps in the dunes and cleared lanes to and from them.
    - A Field Company, Pioneer Company and eight dozers landed to start work on improving exits.
    - As the tide rose some of the units assigned to clearing beach obstacles were diverted to developing exits. These included AVREs, Flails and dozers from Clearance Teams, Field Companies, RN Landing Craft Obstruction Clearance Units and Pioneers.
    - All engineer units landing after the initial waves were to send an officer or NCO to the RE Report Centre to see if they were to be diverted from their assigned tasks. Some of these were re deployed on developing exits.
    - Some engineer units reported that they were met by engineer officers before they had reported and they were re deployed on developing exits.


    Work on the first eight exits, four on Queen Red and four on Queen White, started at H Hour when the breaching teams landed. The beach exits were designated by colour, Green, Yellow, Blue and Red. Since there were also Red and White Beaches this can be confusing. It was planned that beach exits would be marked by windsocks. On D Day those exits which were being developed would each fly a windsock of the relevant colour. Queen Red and Queen White each flew windsocks which were, from right (west) to left (east):
    Green/White Yellow/White Blue/White Red/White.

    Some teams had problems in erecting windsocks and some lost them before they could be erected. In the case of 2 Troop 77 Squadron, which landed in the wrong place and thus spoiling the sequence, they removed the coloured section and flew a white one. It was thought that the windsocks acted as a ranging and aiming point for mortars, which caused casualties to personnel and vehicles working on the exits. The use of the windsocks was discontinued.

    Obstacle Clearance.
    Beach Obstacles were fairly simple and included.
    - Hedgehogs. Constructed from three 6 foot (approx.) lengths of angle iron welded together.
    - Timber Ramp. These were the main type of obstacle found all along the beaches. They were removed by attaching tow rope to an AVRE or dozer and pulling. The structure collapsed and could then be removed. There was usually a Teller mine or HE shell with pressure ignite on top.
    - Timber posts. These leant slightly off shore and had a Teller mine on top. They were removed by direct pull with dozer.

    One report suggests that shells or mines were only attached to every other obstacle. It is difficult to say if this was because they were in short supply or because they had fallen off.

    Clearance Teams landed with the Breaching Teams and had additional armoured vehicles for beach clearance. They were to clear beach obstacles from four zones, two per beach. Each zone was to be 225 yards wide and extend from four foot below water level to the top of the beach. Each squadron provided a Clearance Team which had four AVRE and four Flails, with the squadron commander’s AVRE and a Flail in reserve. All vehicles had slings and chains with hooks and the AVREs were fitted with Bullshorn Ploughs. The armoured vehicles were to mark the left and right limits of the zone with tripods. They would then reconnoitre the zones and note any unexpected features.

    The plan was to land one team per zone, of AVREs and flails with the breaching teams at H Hour. Each team consisted of two AVREs and one flail. In reserve were the squadron leaders AVRE and one flail. At H+20 minutes two LCAs were to land at each zone, each LCA carrying approximately 20 men of 629 Field Squadron RE. With these sapper LCAs were to come in 7 and 8 LCOCUs, each carried in their own LCA, one to each beach. Ten minutes later 263 Field Company RE was due in, to act as a reserve and generally assist.


    Queen White.
    Each LCT carried an extra armoured vehicle for Beach Clearance, and more were carried in LCT(A)s. 77 Squadron provided 5 AVRE with Bullshorn ploughs which were intended to assist with demolishing and towing away beach obstacles and then using the ploughs to turn up mines on the beach.

    LCT 110A was late in landing. Each of the four troops should have landed one AVRE with plough. 4 Troops vehicle could not land as the LCTs exit was blocked. One other AVRE was hit and two crew were killed. There were then only two left. These towed porpoises to above the high water line and then returned to remove shells from the hedgehogs. These were stacked in German slit trenches until they could be disposed of. The hedgehogs were then towed away.

    Once the hedgehogs had been removed from the lane attention was turned to the stakes. First the mines were removed from the top of the stakes. This was done by standing on a flail tank. As the tide came in the work continued until the water reached the turret top when the hatch was closed and work continued until it was finally forced to go ashore. It must have left it too late as the engine gave out. The mines were usually covered in pitch to water proof them. This made removing igniters difficult. Charges were removed and taken to a safe place and detonated in bulk. No beacons were erected as the area was not clear of obstacles.

    When it was no longer possible to work on the obstacles the teams assisted in keeping the exits and roads open. When the tide ebbed the teams returned to clear the beach and by nightfall the sector was clear.


    At H + 20 minutes four LCA, each with 21 sappers from 629 Field Squadron RE, should land on each beach, together with a quantity of engineer stores. By this time the gaps to be cleared should have been marked by ARRE teams. Each beach deployed two troops each divided into two teams. Each team was carried in its own LCA and was to make a start on clearing and marking 112 yard wide paths through the beach obstacles. They would first disarm and remove mines and then hook up the obstacles to tanks of the Clearance Teams to be towed away to dumps. If it was not possible to tow away obstacles each sapper carried eight 3lb made up charges with which to demolish the obstacles. After completion of the initial task of clearing beach obstacles the squadron was to revert to 101 Beach Sub Area.

    Each man was laden with an assault jacket carrying personal kit and rations instead of webbing and pack. A demolition pack with six 8lb charges, initiators and fixing wires was carried on the back. Each man also carried an axe or a shovel, wire cutters, pliers and a rope sling. All personnel wore mae wests. Each LCA also carried several spare demolition packs and three sets of lightweight diving equipment. More equipment and stores were carried in the porpoises towed ashore by AVREs.

    The LCAs arrived on time but found the tide much higher than expected. The LCAs were used to carry out a reconnaissance of the obstacles and then sappers attempted to remove mines from the obstacles while still in the craft. This proved difficult and hazardous so the sappers landed, with only a minimum of equipment, and attempted to remove mines. The cold water, strong tide and high waves quickly exhausted the men and they moved up the beach to lay a beach lateral with chespale and Sommerfeld track

    263 Field Company was a late addition to the order of battle. Only four weeks before D day they were placed under the command of 3 Division and sent for training in the clearance of beach obstacles. As there was no spare shipping it was planned that they would cross the Channel on the LSIs carrying Lord Lovats Commandos. To ease the strain on accommodation they were to board late on D-1. Ten LCMs would cross the Channel, each with a Carrier loaded with explosives and mine detectors, and collect the company personnel from the LSIs. It was intended that they would land at H+30 minutes.

    The role of 263 Field Company was to form a reserve or second string for the clearance of beach obstacles which had already begun. After assisting the Assault Group RE to open beach exits this company reverted to 3 Division at approximately H + 4 Hours. The personnel were to cross the Channel on the small LSIs carrying Commandos. Ten LCMs would cross the Channel, each carrying a carrier loaded with explosives and mine detectors. They were to collect the company personnel from the LSIs and land at H+30 minutes. In the event the landing was confused. The LCMs had a difficult crossing and were late arriving. It was arranged that two LCI(L) would collect the personnel from the LSIs and take them to the beach. The LCMs did eventually arrive and an attempt was made to load the personnel into them but the men were heavily laden, the sea very rough and scrambling nets hazardous. It was decided to use the LCIs with the LCMs following in convoy. The landing from LCIs was made under fire and in five foot of water. Five of the LCMs were washed away and either did not land or landed in the wrong place and could not land their carriers. Five LCMs did land their Carriers but one was disabled by a mine and one overturned in the water. Eventually four Carriers were salvaged. Such explosives and mine detectors as could be salvaged were stacked on the beach.

    When the company landed they were nearly an hour and a half late, the tide was high and they were all on Red Beach at La Breche instead of being spread across the whole of Queen. Since obstacle clearance was not possible the company commander decided to concentrate on clearing beach exits and laying track to try and relieve congestion. The company worked on six beach exits. Thirty five casualties were suffered in the first two hours.


    Landing Craft Obstacle Clearance Units.
    One team landed on each beach at H+20 minutes. Each team landed in their own LCA (Obstacle Clearance) which carried eleven men and their equipment. Divers wore neoprene suits, breathing apparatus, fins and blast proof kapok jackets. The LCOCUs were to mark the limits of the zones as they were cleared, to guide incoming traffic and to mark wrecks. With their Asdic they were to search for submerged obstacles, and some of their personnel wearing Deep Sea equipment could be used to break up obstacles in water which was too deep for the sappers.

    The success of the clearance plan largely depended on the landing craft grounding to seaward of the obstacles, so that the work could be completed ahead of the rising tide. In the event the strong on shore wind and a few minutes delay in the touch down found the lowest obstacle already in some four feet of water. Conditions were aggravated by a heavy swell.

    The AVRE/flail teams were only able to erect a few tripod markers and most of these were soon knocked down; this was to make it difficult for the LCOCUs to distinguish the zones. As the craft carrying the sappers of 629 Field Squadron came in it was clear that the removal of the stakes would be impossible and an attempt was made to disarm the Tellermines and shells. Sappers were put over the side of the LCAs but the effort was only partially successful. The sea was running too strongly and the men quickly became exhausted in the water or were swept away. The craft were eventually grounded soon after 8 o’clock and the sappers set about such obstacles as still remained above water.

    The LCOCUs found only one zone ready to be buoyed. This they marked and then tried to demolish obstacles under water. The surf was too heavy to control the LCA from which the divers worked and the continuous flow of craft driving into the beach made the work hazardous. In consequence the senior LCOCU officer ordered his men ashore to work with the sappers. The AVRE/flail teams had lost heavily and there were only two AVREs left to work on White Beach. Attempts were made to remove the Tellermines by men perched on the outside of the tanks but the waves were breaking over the top of the turrets and the tank commanders had to keep closed down. These difficulties, combined with the attention of enemy machine gunners in the beach villas, forced the tanks to give up this procedure and the gapping teams were gradually compelled to cease work until the tide should recede. The beach by now was very narrow and was jammed with vehicles and tanks, many of which were burning fiercely. At 0830 hours the squadron leader in charge decided that further work was impossible and incoming craft must risk the mines. For the time being all tanks and personnel directed their efforts to keeping the roads off the beaches clear and generally to improving the exits and lanes.


    It seems from various reports that the four 225 yard wide zones were cleared of hedgehogs and the mines which were attached to posts before the tide halted work. The obstacles that remained do not seem to have prevented craft from landing. They either passed over them or crushed them. Damage was caused to craft however, especially when reversing off the beach when the obstacles damaged propellers, rudders and engine rooms.


    Beach Group engineers began to arrive to develop the exits from H+45 minutes, although reconnaissance teams landed earlier.

    84 Field Company.
    This company landed together with 53 Pioneer Company and eight bulldozers from 50 Mechanical Equipment Section to work on the beach exits for wheeled vehicles. Each bulldozer towed a trailer loaded with trackway. Further trailers with trackway were towed ashore by tractors of the Beach Recovery Section. A secondary task was mine clearance.

    Reconnaissance parties landed at H+20. Each beach, Queen White and Queen Red each landed a reconnaissance party of six men and a duplicate reconnaissance party, also of six men, in case of mishaps. This proved to be a wise precaution as the reconnaissance officer was killed on landing. These parties were to inspect and assess the work already done and plan the work of the personnel and equipment which would soon arrive. Also landing at this time were four seven man sections from 53 Pioneer Company.

    At H+45 four exit teams, each of six men and a handcart with tools and explosives, landed on each of Queen White and Queen Red. These were to make a start on improving the exits. Also landing were a four man team to establish a RE Report Centre on each beach. All engineer units sent an officer or NCO to report to this centre in case they were needed for work on the exits. Each beach also received a 3ton 4 X 4 Karrier Winch Lorry. A halftrack landed for the twelve man command party which would arrive at H+60.

    At H+60 forty men landed for mine reconnaissance for the Beach Dressing Station. At H+240 a further twelve men with three handcarts plus a further 3ton 4 X 4 Karrier Winch Lorry.


    50 Mechanical Equipment Section.
    This section operated angledozers and other earth moving equipment. It landed in two echelons with the first landing at H+45, although reconnaissance parties landed at H Hour. A two man reconnaissance party landed on each beach to prepare plans for the deployment of the dozers when they landed at H+45 minutes

    Eight angledozers landed at H+45 and were to work with field companies in clearing exits and forward routes. The War Diary gives the eight dozers as four Tractor, Crawler, Class III, Armoured D6 and four Tractor, Crawler, Class II, Armoured D7. Each dozer had a crew of three men. Each of the angledozers towed a Jahn 8 ton trailer carrying engineer roadway stores. The loaded dimensions of the trailers were not to exceed 22 foot 6 inches by 8 foot. A further 8ton trailer and two 20 ton SMT trailers carrying engineer stores were towed ashore by D8 tractors of the Beach Recovery Section REME. Were The loaded dimensions of the 20 ton trailers was not to exceed 29 foot by 8 foot 6 inches. The trailers carried mainly chespale trackway. This had been loaded by 84 Field Company. The rolls of trackway were held in place by uprights fitted to the sides of the flatbed trailers. These were fitted with explosive charges which allowed the load to fall off when they were fired. Some trailers were left in the surf as they were difficult to tow up the beach, but the trackway was eventually recovered. More trackway was carried on the side platforms of LCTs which carried engineers. This was simply jettisoned by engineer personnel. It would then wash ashore and be collected.

    The Captain, Officer Commanding, was wounded on landing. Four exits were opened by the dozers on Queen White and Queen Red. One dozer was put out of action by a mine.

    As work on obstacle clearance had ceased there were now a number of units working on the beach exits.
    - The breaching and clearance teams from 5 ARRE.
    - 629 Field Squadron RE.
    - 263 Field Company RE.
    - LCOCUs
    - 84 Field Company RE.
    - 50 Mechanical Equipment Section RE.
    - 53 Pioneer Company.

    The fact that the Commanding Officer 5 Beach Group was killed, some personnel of 84 Field Company were landed in the wrong place and the tide interrupted the programme of beach clearance meant that junior RE officers had to use their initiative and organise parties from the nearest available men and equipment, regardless of unit, to open exits.
    Between H+60 minutes and H+120 minutes many carriers which had landed were unable to get off the beach and this caused congestion. The carriers tended to shelter under the dunes, a sensible precaution, but this interfered with the work of making exits, lateral tracks, command posts etc.

    By H+2 hours there were two tracked exits available, one each on Queen White and Queen Red. Some armoured vehicles of the ARRE and 13/18 Hussars had left the beach and moved off in support of the assault troops but there were many carriers and halftracks which had landed but were unable to leave the beach until these exits were complete. In any operation there is a conflict between the wish to move vehicles through the exit at the earliest possible time and the need to finish the exit as quickly as possible. It is not practicable to do both simultaneously.

    By H+4 hours there were two wheeled exits available in addition to the tracked exits and wheeled vehicles were being landed. There was a strict separation of wheeled vehicles and tracked vehicles. The exits for tracked vehicles were not suited to wheeled vehicles and tracked vehicles were not allowed on the wheeled exits because of the damage their tracks caused, especially when turning.

    For the first 4½ hours practically all craft touched down at the time stated in the Landing Table. At this point it was necessary to delay succeeding flights for 30 minutes in order to clear the beaches of the backlog of vehicles which were unable to get off the beach because:
    - At high water the beaches were very narrow, only 30 feet, and there was very little room to manoeuvre vehicles.
    - Two regiments of self propelled artillery, unable to get off the beach, were sitting on it and giving counter battery fire.
    - A number of wheeled vehicles, especially bridging vehicles, could not get across the soft sand with their loads and in many cases required the assistance of recovery vehicles.
    - Seven DD tanks and four AVRE were stranded on the beach.
    - Some craft were stranded on the beach.
    - There was soft sand above the high water mark.
    - Tracked vehicles lost tracks on mines when crossing from the exit to the first lateral.

    Also at H+4 hours the beaches were under artillery fire which destroyed a number of vehicles and lorries. The crowded beached made tempting targets although it was not thought that the enemy artillery was able to use observers to control fire at this time. It was thought that the enemy were ranging on the barrage balloons, of which some sixty were flying. These were cut adrift. Canvas beach signs were also removed for the same reason.

    By H+7 hours all craft had touched down and the beach exits were clear and ready to receive the loads from LSTs. The discharge of LSTs by Rhino was delayed and the first Rhinos did not beach until H+9½ hours. By this time Queen White had opened two wheeled exits and two tracked exits, and Queen Red had opened two wheeled exits and three tracked exits. By this time a beach lateral track was also 60% complete. This was initially made using chespale trackway. It was only one vehicle wide so was restricted to one way traffic to the nearest exit.



    Mine Clearance.
    It was found that the beaches were not heavily mined although there were a great many mines on the roads and fields inland. Only one Bullshead Plough was actually used for clearing mines. Such mine casualties as there were on the beach seem to have been caused by mines or shells falling off the beach obstacles.

    Inland there were extensive minefields, especially around the strongpoints. Once the flails had cleared the beach exits they were available to move on and clear the lateral roads and the main forward routes. Mines were thickly sown along the roads and paths including the track along the edge of the dunes, the roads leading from the beach, the paths between houses and the main lateral road. These mines were mainly Teller 35 mines, ‘S’ type anti personnel mines and ex French anti tank mines. On the roads and paths these could be cleared by Flails, although for various reasons some were inevitably missed and exploded when vehicles crossed over them later.

    Many of the open areas and gardens allotted to various units for dumps, parks and headquarters etc. were also extensively mined, especially between the beach and the main lateral road. These were to have been cleared by engineer units but the personnel were few and the tasks many. All units were trained in the clearing of mines from their allotted areas and many reported having done so.

    Beyond the lateral road minefields were surrounded by wire and had warning notices. Some of these minefields were found to be dummies and contained no mines. Some however were sown with metal plates which gave signals on mine detectors similar to those given by mines. This naturally slowed down the task of clearance while areas were checked. A further complication was that many areas were strewn with metal fragments from air and naval bombardment and these also gave false indications to mine detectors.

    Mine clearance continued steadily for some weeks and up to the end of June the beach group field company had lifted some 4500, 3,500 of them by D+10. In the process 35 sappers were killed or wounded.

    Numbers of ‘Goliath’ self propelled and remote controlled demolition vehicles were dug in behind the dunes. None seem to have been activated on D Day but they had never the less to be treated as dangerous. When disarmed the engineers used some as runabouts.

    On other beaches it had been possible to identify minefields from air photographs. Where the earth has been disturbed there are often pattern in crops visible from above which are not visible from the ground. This was well known to archaeologists. Since no mines were sown in ploughed land or grassland on Sword this was not relevant.

    Some other beaches also had minefield using wooden mines which could not be detected using mine detectors. These do not seem to have been used on Sword. Where they were found dogs were particularly useful in locating them.

    On officer and one lance serjeant from 59 Bomb Disposal Section landed on D Day and started to dispose of bombs with the assistance of field company and artisan works company personnel. Up to D+4 they disposed of forty German SD2 bombs, ten German 50Kg bombs, one British 500lb bomb and seventeen unexploded shells.

    Mine clearance by the book.
    A team moves slowly forward to make and mark a lane through a minefield. The detector operator moves the detector from side to side across the width of the lane to be cleared. When he located a mine a quick check is made to identify it. It is then marked so that the following sappers can lift and disarm it. As the team move forward white tapes are laid to mark the cleared lane.



    SECOND TIDE.
    As time allows the remaining areas of beach outside the original gaps are cleared of obstacles. Sappers fix explosive charges to the obstacles, wire them together and then detonate them all together. The debris can then be collected using a 3ton lorry.

    When explosive charges were to be blown to clear a beach exit a red flag was flown. When the charge was about to be blown a bugle was sounded and all personnel were to retire and take cover.

    Some heavier equipment arrived on LSTs and was due to land on the second tide.

    50 ME Section.
    Due to arrive at H+12 hours were a two man advanced party for each beach. Also due to start landing from H+12 hours were a further eight dozers and trailers. The dozers were probably HD7 and HD10 since these are listed in the landing tables and the War Diary mentions two HD10 as being damaged by mines. If this supposition is correct then eight Angledozer Class III, HD7 and four Angledozer Class II HD10 landed. They towed between them ten 8ton Jahn trailers and two 20 ton SMT trailers, presumably all loaded with trackway stores. Also landing were eight Scraper, 4 yard Le Tourneau, towed by D8 tractors of Beach Recovery Section REME.

    The War Diary lists
    8 Angledozers, unidentified but presumably HD7 and HD 10. T HD10 are listed as being later damaged by mines.
    2 20 ton trailer
    6 8ton trailer
    8 4yd scraper
    1 officer and 27 other ranks.

    These made additional exits and started improvements to the first lateral road.

    On D+1 the Section Headquarters moved from the beach to the Villa Gloriosa, La Breche. Work continued on the beaches, extra exits were made and existing exits were improved, improvement of the first lateral road was started and assistance was given in beach clearance.

    More heavy equipment was due to land on the 3rd tide but did not actually land until D+2.
    2 Excavator 3/8 yard RB 10.
    2 Excavator 5/8 yard RB 19.
    4 Heavy Artillery Tractor, Scammell.
    4 3ton Tipper, Dennis.
    4 Dumper 2yd, Muirhill.
    1 15cwt water trailer.
    23 men.


    From D+1 exits were to fly windsocks which indicated the type of vehicle which it could accept. Tracked exits were to fly a Black/White/Black windsock. Wheeled exits were to fly a Dark Blue windsock. DUKW exits were to fly a Yellow/Light Blue/Yellow windsock. In the event it was found that whenever a windsock was erected it attracted enemy fire so their use was discontinued, apparently without any real inconvenience.



    On D+1 further exits were constructed on Queen Green and Roger Green. It was planned that Queen Green would be developed for the landing of stores since this beach was nearest to the dumps of the Beach maintenance Area. Roger Green was to be developed for the landing of vehicles and personnel since it was nearest to the assembly areas.

    Also on D+1 work continued on the construction of the beach lateral which would connect the exits. This was constructed using Summerfeld track, either replacing or covering the chespale track. At this time the lateral was still single width since there was not sufficient track material to construct the planned double width track. Only wheeled vehicles were to be allowed to use this track since tracked vehicles quickly damaged it. Where tracked vehicles had to cross the lateral to reach exits crossing places of Pierced Steel Planking was used. Initially the track needed some 25% replacement each day.

    By D+4 the beach lateral had been made double width and better management and traffic control reduced the replacement to some 15% per day.

    Labour on the beaches on D Day and D+1 was at certain periods of the day found to be insufficient to cope with the clearance of beached craft, and at the same time clear the beaches of underwater obstacles. On D+2, D+3 and D+4 the difficulties were overcome by employing some 500 prisoners of war for ten hours each day. From D+4 to D+16 Flag Officer Force ‘S’ arranged for a working party of 100 to 150 RN and RM personnel to assist with clearance work on the beaches.


    From 12 June 84 Field Company started to improve some beach exits by concreting them. Concrete mixers were found in Ouistreham and in contractors dumps along the beach. These had been in use by the Germans to improve the defences. One concrete exit was made on Roger green and two were made on Queen Red. One was a twenty foot wide two way DUKW exit and once complete was in constant use for the unloading of coasters. At the same time the main lateral road was improved by concreting, especially where the road had been widened by the removal of the rail lines.

    As enemy shelling continued it was decided to construct more beach exits further west. Most artillery fire was coming from the east. Initially three exits were opened on Peter Red and two more were added. These latter two were opened on 26 June. This work was entrusted to 629 Field Squadron with assistance from a platoon of 91 Field Company.

    Even further west three exits were constructed on Peter Green at Petit Enfer beach in Luc sur Mer. This was a pre war beach resort and there was already access to the beach. Exits consisted of steep ramps up to the coastal road. One existing ramp went up in a series of terraces and these had to be bulldozed to provide an even slope. Another exit was blocked by a reinforced concrete wall some four foot thick, presumably part of the German defences. This was demolished. Apart from removing some two hundred mines little other work was required. The tide at this point went right up to the sea wall and no beach lateral was used. The exits were opened on 26 June and were open to DUKW traffic on 1 July.

    The opening of these new exits required the coastal road from Luc sur Mer towards Lion sur Mer to be improved. This road was generally not in good condition to begin with and suffered with the heavy traffic. Much of the material required for the work came from a quarry worked by 91 Field Company. This produced 250 tons of stone a day.


    Two LCTs carrying stores were off the beaches at H+2 hours. At H+4 hours two further LCTs carrying stores arrived and all four landed together. However the congestion on the beaches made it impossible to commence discharging these LCTs immediately. By H+7 hours the initial rush of vehicles was cleared and discharge of these LCTs was commenced. Discharge was held up from time to time by shelling. Three LCTs completed discharge by late evening of D Day and the fourth on the morning of D+1.
     
  7. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    SWORD BEACH.
    H+7hours approximately.
    A group of five LSTs have already launched DUKWs from their tank deck, and from derricks in some cases, and then transferred vehicles from the main deck to the tank deck. They will then be transferred to the Rhino ferries which each LST tows.

    Although the landing tables for individual LSTs seem rather a hotch potch, when taken as a group a clear pattern is apparent. The following shows the vehicles and personnel to be landed by unit rather than by LST load.

    Each LST carries personnel from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company RE for operating the Rhino Ferry, plus a detachment of 267 Pioneer Company and a Caterpillar D8 angledozer to assist on shore:

    1 Angledozer Class I Caterpillar D8 with 3 crew from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company Type ‘C’.
    14 men from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company Type ‘C’.
    9 men from 267 Pioneer Company. To assist with Rhino operation.

    1 Angledozer Class I Caterpillar D8 with 3 crew from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company Type ‘C’.
    14 men from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company Type ‘C’.
    9 men from 267 Pioneer Company. To assist with Rhino operation.

    1 Angledozer Class I Caterpillar D8 with 3 crew from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company Type ‘C’.
    13 men from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company Type ‘C’.
    9 men from 267 Pioneer Company. To assist with Rhino operation.

    1 Angledozer Class I Caterpillar D8 with 3 crew from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company Type ‘C’.
    13 men from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company Type ‘C’.
    9 men from 267 Pioneer Company. To assist with Rhino operation.

    1 Angledozer Class I Caterpillar D8 with 3 crew from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company Type ‘C’.
    13 men from 940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company Type ‘C’.
    9 men from 267 Pioneer Company. To assist with Rhino operation.

    20 Beach Recovery Section REME.
    2 4ton 6 X 6 Breakdown, Ward La France. Carried on Rhinos.
    14 men.

    RA
    Heavy Anti Aircraft and Medium artillery units would arrive on the second tide but even in the amphibious landing the Royal Artillery observed the correct methods of deployment. Reconnaissance units would arrive first and examine the proposed sites and then arrange the layout with gun area, command posts and wagon lines. Communications would be established and everything would be ready for the guns to arrive and go straight into action if required. The following are the Reconnaissance parties for 103 HAA Regiment.

    103 HAA Regiment RA
    103 HAA Regiment was a part of 80 AA Brigade. This would come under 101 Beach Sub Area when the command structure was in place but for the night of D Day/D+1 it would remain under CRA 3 Division. Some of the gun troops of 103 HAA Regiment would land on Queen on the second tide (after H+12 hours) and one troop (‘F’) would land on Juno/Nan Beach.

    The Commanding Officer had already landed at H+240 hours.

    1 Heavy Utility 4 X 4, Humber, with 5 crew from Regimental Headquarters 103 HAA Regiment RA. Recce party.

    1 Jeep with 4 crew from Battery Headquarters 322 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance party.
    1 man with a motorcycle from Battery HQ 322 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance party.

    1 Jeep with 5 crew from 322 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance group for ‘A’ Troop.
    10 men from 322 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance group for ‘A’ Troop.

    1 Jeep with 5 crew from ‘B’ Troop, 322 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance party.
    10 men from ‘B’ Troop, 322 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance party.

    1 Jeep with 5 crew from 324 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance party.
    10 men from 324 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance party.

    1 Jeep with 4 crew from 324 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. ‘E’ Troop reconnaissance party.
    1 man with a motorcycle from 324 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. ‘E’ Troop reconnaissance party.

    1 Jeep with 5 crew from 324 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance group for ‘F’ Troop.
    10 men from 324 Battery, 103 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance group for ‘F’ Troop.


    The following were to land on Sword but move across to Nan Beach on Juno as soon as possible. This move would be delayed since neither of the lateral roads between beaches was clear of the enemy.

    1 Jeep with 4 crew from 273 Battery, 86 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance group for Nan Beach.
    1 man with a motorcycle from 273 Battery, 86 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance group for Nan Beach.
    10 men from 273 Battery, 86 HAA Regiment RA. Reconnaissance group for Nan Beach.

    73 LAA Regiment RA.
    This was a unit of 80 AA Brigade. Only Headquarters and 218 Battery were under command of 3 Division. Two troops, ‘A’ and ‘C’, with self propelled guns landed in the first two hours. ‘B’ Troop was not assigned to Sword Beach.

    1 Heavy Utility 4 X 4, Humber, with 5 crew from Regimental Headquarters. Reconnaissance party.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 FFW, Chevrolet, with 6 crew from Battery Headquarters 220 Battery, 73 LAA Regiment RA. Command and reconnaissance party.

    The Commanding Officer was Anti Aircraft Defence Commander for the Beach Group and the regimental headquarters formed the Beach Group Anti Aircraft Defence Headquarters. Anti Aircraft Defence Commander Headquarters will be established near a position where a suitable Command Post can be set up. This should be near the Beach Group Headquarters. The sub Anti Aircraft Operations Room wireless communications will land and be established near this headquarters.

    166 AA Operations Room.
    6 men. Reconnaissance party.

    474 Searchlight Battery RA.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 FFW with 5 crew. Reconnaissance party.
    1 Jeep with 3 crew. Reconnaissance party.

    RAMC
    1 Casualty Evacuation Post, 30 Field Dressing Station.
    30 Field Dressing Station was employed by the 101 Beach Sub Area as 1 Casualty Evacuation Post. It would care for casualties until they could be evacuated by DUKW to specially equipped and manned LSTs. Small parties landed at H+120 and H+150 with the main party landing at H+240.
    1 Heavy Ambulance 4 stretcher, Austin, 4 X 2.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 15cwt Water, Bedford.
    1 motorcycle.
    8 men and a bicycle.

    16 Casualty Clearing Station RAMC.
    This was a unit assigned to 101 Beach Sub Area.
    20 men from
    50 men.
    50 men.

    1 Field Sanitation Section.
    1 man (serjeant inspector) with a motorcycle. Carried In a vehicle of 84 Field Company RE.


    RE
    84 Field Company RE.
    101 Beach Area unit for beach exits and beach clearance. Most had already landed in the first waves.
    3 3 ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 5 crew.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, towing water purification trailer with 5 crew.
    22 men.

    91 Field Company RE.
    101 Beach Area unit for transit and assembly areas. Advanced party
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 1 crew.
    47 men with 2 airborne handcarts.



    HQ 101 Beach Sub Area.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Headquarters 101 Beach Sub Area.
    4 men from Headquarters 101 Beach Sub Area.
    1 Jeep with 1 crew from 21 Army Group Movement Control Pool. Principal Military Landing Officers car.
    4 men from 21 Army Group Movement Control Pool.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from 21 AG Movement Control Pool, 5 Beach Group. MLOs Staff 8 Brigade.
    1 man with a motorcycle from 21 Army Group Movement Control Pool, 5 Beach Group. MLOs Staff 8 Brigade.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Deputy Assistant Provost Marshal 101 Beach Sub Area.
    3 men from Commander RASC 21 Lines of Communication.
    1 15cwt 4 X 2 GS, Bedford, with 4 crew from Civil Affairs detachment.
    1 man with a motorcycle from Civil Affairs detachment.
    1 vehicle (type unknown) with 3 crew from Assembly Area Reconnaissance Party and Assembly Area Control.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from 18 Movement Control Group RE.
    3 men from 18 Movement Control Group RE.
    5 men from 9 Port Operating Group RE.

    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, from Headquarters 101 Beach Sub Area Signal Section.
    2 Jeep from Headquarters 101 Beach Sub Area Signal Section.
    3 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP) from Headquarters 101 Beach Sub Area Signal Section.
    6 motorcycles from Headquarters 101 Beach Sub Area Signal Section.
    19 men from Headquarters 101 Beach Sub Area Signal Section.

    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Commander RE GHQ Troops Engineers.
    1 Jeep with 3 crew from Commander RE GHQ Troops Engineers.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, towing 1 ton trailer GS with 2 crew from Commander RE, GHQ Troops Engineers.

    Headquarters 5 Beach Group.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew from 5 Kings Regiment. Headquarters 5 Beach Group. Carries 2 bicycles.

    RASC
    237 Petrol Depot RASC.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS Austin towing a Dennis fire pump trailer with 2 crew.
    17 men with 3 handcarts and 3 bicycles.

    39 General Transport Company RASC.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 3 crew.

    101 General Transport Company RASC.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.

    96 Detail Issue Depot RASC.
    36 men with 3 handcarts and 3 bicycles.


    RAOC
    44 Ordnance Ammunition Company.
    1 15cwt 4 X 2, Ford, with 3 crew.
    1 man with a motorcycle. Carried on above 15cwt.

    11 Ordnance Beach Detachment.
    3 men with 3 motorcycles.


    Provost
    241 Headquarters Provost Company.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.

    Pioneer.
    303 Pioneer Company.
    For medical labour. Personnel already ashore.
    2 15cwt 4 X 2 GS with 4 crew.
    1 Car 2 seater, Austin, with 2 crew.
    3 men.

    53 Pioneer Company.
    For work on Beach Exits. Personnel already ashore.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew.
    2 men with 2 bicycles.

    292 Pioneer Company.
    For work in sector store dumps. Personnel already ashore.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew.
    2 men with 2 bicycles.

    102 Pioneer Company.
    For work in sector store dumps. Personnel already shore.
    2 men.

    112 Pioneer Smoke Company.
    For AA Defence under 80 AA Brigade.
    6 men. Reconnaissance party.


    115 Medium Wireless Section.
    This section operated Wireless sets No33 for long range communication. One net connected the different beaches while a second provided communication back to the UK.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Bedford QLR, with 5 crew.
    1 man with a motorcycle.

    BAN. RN.
    22 men with 3 handcarts, 1 bicycle and 1 motorcycle from Nucleus BAN Section. For Mobile Beach Signal Section.
    1 30cwt lorry with 6 crew from VHF Simplex, BAN.

    50 Beach Balloon Unit RAF.
    11 men with 5 balloons and handwinches. To rig balloons on LST and then on the beach.



    4 Army Group Royal Artillery.
    53 Medium Regiment (4 AGRA) will land on the second tide under the CRA. It will be responsible for counter battery tasks in conjunction with the Assistant Counter Battery Officer. It was considered essential to have medium artillery ashore and under the direct control of the CRA 3 Division. It was thought more convenient, more reliable and more easily controlled than depending on RN gunfire.

    65 Medium Regiment (4 AGRA) will land on Juno Beach and deploy in 3 Division area to support 6 Airborne Division.

    3 Division Signals.
    It is thought that this is the advanced party to establish communications between CRA 3 Division and 53 Medium Regiment. There is not normally a ‘T’ Section in 2 Company (RA signals) but sections are added when extra units were attached, as here.
    1 M3A1 White 15cwt 4 X 4 with 5 crew from ‘T’ Section, 2 Company, 3 Division Signals
    1 Jeep with 4 crew from ‘T’ Section, 2 Company, 3 Division Signals.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from 3 Division Signals.

    53 Medium Regiment.
    53 Medium Regiment from 4 AGRA was under the command of CRA 3 Division for Counter Battery tasks. One battery was to be available to support 6 Airborne Division.

    Apart from the fact that the regiment was arriving by sea its organisation for movement and deployment was the same as for any operation. The reconnaissance parties would arrive first and set up the gun area ready for the main parties to land on the second tide. The batteries could move straight to their firing positions, having passed through the assembly area first.

    Regiment Headquarters reconnaissance party.
    1 Heavy Utility 4 X 4, Humber.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP).
    2 motorcycle.
    9 men.

    Battery reconnaissance parties.
    1 15cwt Wireless House.
    1 M14 Halftrack.
    2 motorcycle.
    14 men.

    1 M14 Halftrack.
    1 15cwt Wireless House.
    2 Motorcycles.
    14 men.


    101 Anti Tank Battery RA.
    101 Anti Tank Battery was from the divisional 20 Anti Tank Regiment. 101 Battery was to support 9 Brigade. Its self propelled troop had already landed at H+360 minutes. A Reconnaissance party had landed at H+240.

    5 Carrier Universal towing four 6pdr AT guns.
    3 motorcycles.
    34 men.

    5 Carrier Universal towing four 6pdr AT guns.
    2 motorcycles.
    35 men.

    5 Carrier Universal towing four 6pdr AT guns.
    3 motorcycles.
    34 men.

    652 AOP Squadron.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 4 crew.
    21 men.


    9 Field Ambulance RAMC.
    9 Field Ambulance together with 39 and 40 Field Surgical Units and 21 Field transfusion Unit provided medical services for 9 Brigade. Headquarters and three sections had landed at H+240, with a further section and jeep ambulances at H+360.
    3 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 6 crew.
    10 Light Field Ambulance 2 stretcher with 20 crew.
    3 15cwt GS 4 X 4 (CMP) with 6 crew.
    2 men with 2 motorcycles.

    39 Field Surgical Unit RAMC.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.
    7 men.

    40 Field Surgical Unit RAMC.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.
    7 men.

    21 Field Transfusion Unit RAMC.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.
    2 men.


    Light Aid Detachments landed for armour and artillery units already ashore.
    LAD 13/18 Hussars.
    2 4ton 6 X 6 Breakdown, Ward La France.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP).
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    3 men with 3 motorcycles.
    19 men.

    Staffordshire Yeomanry LAD REME.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin,
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP).
    11 men.

    East Riding Yeomanry LAD.
    1 4ton 6 X 6 Breakdown, Ward La France.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP).
    15 men.
    1 man with a motorcycle.

    7 Field Regiment LAD REME.
    3 15cwt GS 4 X 4 (CMP).
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 man with a motorcycle.
    26 men.

    33 Field Regiment LAD REME.
    1 4ton 6 X 6 Breakdown, Ward Le France
    3 15cwt GS 4 X 4 (CMP).
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    2 men with 2 motorcycles.
    30 men..


    20 Anti Tank Regiment LAD.
    1 6 X 4 Breakdown, Scammell with 3 crew.
    1 man with a motorcycle.


    RE
    629 Field Squadron RE.
    3 Division unit.
    4 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 8 crew.
    1 M3A1 White 15cwt 4 X 4 with 2 crew.
    14 men.

    15 Field Park Company RE.
    3 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 6 crew from
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew towing a water purification trailer.
    4 men.

    27 Armoured Brigade Company RASC.
    33 3ton 4 X 4, Austin.
    1 15cwt GS.
    1 15cwt Water, Bedford.
    1 Jeep.
    98 men.


    Headquarters 3 Division.
    1 Heavy Utility 4 X 4, Humber, from Headquarters REME 3 Division.
    1 Jeep with 3 crew from Press. Attached to 3 Division.
    2 Jeeps with 2 crew for Press attached to 3 Division.
    7 men from 3 Divisional Section, 104 Corps Reception Camp.
    1 Jeep with 3 crew from Headquarters 1 Corps ‘Q’. Liaison Officer.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Headquarters I Corps. Liaison Officer.


    Infantry.
    Balance of tactical transport.
    7 Carrier Universal with 28 crew from 1 Kings Own Scottish Borderers.
    7 Carrier Universal with 28 crew from 2 Warwickshire Regiment.
    7 Carrier Universal with 26 crew from 2 Lincolnshire Regiment.


    3 Division Provost Company.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP) with 1 crew.
    2 Jeeps with 2 crew.


    1 Special Service Brigade.
    3 Jeeps with 3 drivers from 6 Commando.
    3 Jeeps with 4 crew from 3 Commando.
    3 Jeeps with 3 crew from 45 Commando.
    2 Jeeps with 2 crew from Forward Observation Parties attached to 1 Special Service Brigade.
    3 Jeeps with 4 crew from one troop RM Engineer Commando.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from 6 Commando
    7 Jeeps with 8 crew from 45 Commando.
    4 Jeeps with 4 crew from 3 Commando.
    2 Jeeps with 2 crew from Forward Observation Officers parties attached to 1 Special Service Brigade.
    2 Jeeps with 2 crew from ‘C’ Bombardment Troop. Attached to 1 Special Service Brigade.
     
  8. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    SWORD BEACH
    H+11½ Hours
    A group of six LCI(L) carrying personnel for 6 Beach Group will beach. 6 Beach Group will pass through 5 Beach Group and set up Assembly Areas and a Beach Maintenance Area.

    6 Beach Group has the convenience of all landing at the same time, even most of its handcarts and vehicles, not that there were many. Although landing at the same time each of the sub units of the Beach Group sent an advanced party ahead to carry out a reconnaissance and be ready to direct the main bodies when they were called forward from the assembly area.

    From 6 Beach Group War Diary.
    - 1640 coast of France sighted.
    - 1900 convoy arrived at disembarkation point and was switched to Queen White.
    - 2030 troops disembarked. One man wounded and almost drowned. The craft were unable to beach in less than five feet of water and many men had to swim the first few yards to shore.
    - 2100 Commanding Officer and Reconnaissance Group assembled at 5 Beach Group Command Post. The situation was unsatisfactory. Enemy troops were still holding out in strongpoint Lion Sur Mer and small numbers were sniping in Ouistreham and La Breche. Reconnaissance of the Beach Maintenance Area was impossible further west than 075812 owing to enemy fire. The decision was taken to expand the Sector Store Dumps until the Beach Maintenance Area was free of the enemy.

    Queen White.
    Serial 600 is an LCI(L) equipped as a flotilla leader for Communications for 6 Beach Group Commander.

    Headquarters 6 Beach Group.
    3 men from Headquarters 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Beach Group Commander and Intelligence Officer.
    2 men from Signal Platoon, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Beach Group Signals Officer.
    3 men from Staff Captains Increment. Including Staff Captain for 6 Beach Group.
    2 men for Staff Captains communications.
    2 men Supply and Transport Increment 6 Beach Group.

    15 men with 2 bicycles from Headquarters 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment.
    17 men with a handcart and 2 bicycles from Headquarters 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment.

    3 men from Headquarters 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Second in Command. Stand by reconnaissance group.
    2 men from Signal Platoon, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Includes signal serjeant.

    18 men with 2 handcarts from Pioneer Platoon, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. For Beach Group Headquarters.
    2 men from Mortar Platoon, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Advanced Party.
    16 men with a handcart and 3 bicycles from Signal Platoon, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment.
    1 man from Signal Platoon, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. For 85 Pioneer Company.

    2 men with 2 bicycles from Support Company, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Advanced Party.
    2 men from ‘B’ Company, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Advanced Party.
    2 men from ‘C’ Company, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Advanced Party.
    2 men with 2 bicycles from ‘A’ Company, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Advanced Party.

    49 men with 4 handcarts from ‘B’ Company, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment.
    49 men with 4 handcarts from ‘A’ Company, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment.

    1 man from 21 Army Group Movement Control Pool. Military Landing Officer, 6 Beach Group.
    1 man from 21 Army group Movement Control Pool. Assistant Military Landing Officer, 6 Beach Group.
    5 men from 21 Army Group Movement Control Pool. Includes Assistant Military Landing Officer for liaison with Senior Officer Ferry Control, 6 Beach group.
    13 men from ‘A’ echelon, 17 Movement Control Group.

    3 men from Port Operating Group Representative.
    3 men from Port Operating Group Representative.

    9 men from 101 Beach Section RAF.


    91 Field Company RE.
    47 men with 2 airborne handcarts
    4 men with 2 bicycles from 91 Field Company RE. Advanced Party.
    47 men with 2 airborne handcarts from 91 Field Company RE.

    9 Stores Section RE.
    2 men with one bicycle from 9 Stores Section RE. Advanced Party.

    50 Mechanical Equipment Section RE
    2 men from 50 Mechanical Equipment Section RE. Advanced Party.

    85 Pioneer Company.
    26 men from 85 Pioneer Company. For Beach Group Headquarters.
    4 men with 2 bicycles from 83 Pioneer Company. Advanced Party.
    128 men with 3 handcarts from 85 Pioneer Company.

    149 Pioneer Company.
    128 men with 2 handcarts from 149 Pioneer Company.


    9 Field Dressing Station RAMC.
    2 men with 2 bicycles from 9 Field Dressing Station RAMC. Advanced Party.
    30 men with a handcart from 9 Field Dressing Station RAMC.
    7 men from 37 Field Surgical Unit RAMC.

    12 Field Dressing Station.
    28 men with a handcart from 12 Field Dressing Station RAMC.

    21 Beach Recovery Section REME.
    4 men from 21 Beach Recovery Section REME. Advanced Party.

    245 Headquarters Provost Company.
    11 men from 245 Headquarters Provost Company.
    16 men with 3 bicycles from 245 Headquarters Provost Company.

    601 Company CMP (Vulnerable Points)
    13 men from 601 Company CMP (Vulnerable Points).

    ‘R’ RN Beach Commando.
    14 men with a handcart from ‘R’ RN Beach Commando. Including Principal Beach Master.
    11 men from ‘R’ RN Beach Commando.

    16 RN Beach Signal Section.
    4 men from 16 RN Beach Signal Section. Advanced Party.
    13 men with 2 handcarts from 16 RN Beach Signal Section. Main Party.

    12 Ordnance Beach Detachment.
    58 men with 5 handcarts from 12 Ordnance Beach Detachment.
    21 men from 44 Ordnance Ammunition Company. To work with Ordnance Beach Detachment.
    1 man from Signal Platoon, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. To work with Ordnance Beach Detachment.

    Plus
    17 men from Headquarters 3 Division.
    20 men from 8 Brigade Workshop REME.
    10 men from 218 Prisoner of War Camp.

    53 Beach Balloon Unit RAF.
    1 man with a balloon from 53 Beach Balloon Unit RAF. To rig balloon on craft.
    1 man with a balloon from 53 Beach Balloon Unit RAF. To rig balloon on craft.
    1 man with a balloon from 53 Beach Balloon Unit RAF. To rig balloon on craft.
    5 men from 53 Beach Balloon Unit RAF. Advanced Party and to rig balloon on craft.



    Queen Red.
    Serial 604 is an LCI(L) equipped as a flotilla leader for Communications for Military Landing Officer.

    Headquarters 6 Beach Group.
    2 men with 2 bicycles from ‘D’ Company, I Buckinghamshire Regiment. Advanced Party.
    1 man from Signals Platoon, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Operator for Advanced Party.
    2 men from Carrier Platoon, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Advanced Party.
    2 men from Headquarters Support Company, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Advanced Party.
    13 men from ‘A’ echelon, 17 Movement Control Group.
    12 men from Headquarters 101 Beach Sub Area.
    8 men from Deputy Assistant Provost Marshall 101 Beach Sub Area.
    12 men from Commander RE, GHQ Troops Engineers.
    13 men with 3 bicycles and a handcart from Signal Platoon, 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment.

    RAMC
    2 men with 2 bicycles from 9 Field Dressing Station RAMC. Advanced Party.
    28 men with a handcart from 12 Field Dressing Station RAMC.
    30 men with a handcart from 9 Field Dressing Station RAMC.
    3 men from 22 Field Transfusion Unit RAMC.
    7 men from 38 Field Surgical Unit RAMC.
    1 man from 2 Field Sanitary Section.
    3 men from 20 Port Detachment RAMC
    ‘R’ Beach Commando RN
    12 men.
    12 men with a handcart. Including Deputy Principal Beach Master.

    16 RN Beach Signal Section.
    4 men. Advanced Party.

    149 Pioneer Company.
    4 men with 2 bicycles. Advanced Party.
    128 men with a handcart.

    85 Pioneer Company.
    74 men.

    245 Headquarters Provost Company.
    22 men with 6 bicycles.

    138 Detail Issue Depot RASC.
    6 men with 6 bicycles. Advanced Party.

    12 Ordnance Beach Detachment.
    4 men with 4 bicycles. Advanced Party.

    91 Field Company RE
    48 men with 2 handcarts.

    53 Beach Balloon Unit RAF
    2 men with 2 balloons. To rig balloon on craft.
    3 men. Advanced Party.

    101 Beach Section RAF.
    9 men.
     
  9. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    SWORD BEACH.
    H+12 Hours.

    Nine LSTs arrive. Only four are towing Rhino Ferries. The remaining five were to be unloaded by the Rhinos of the H+7 flight or by the four being towed by this flight. In either case unloading all the LSTs could take some time. In the event the bad weather conditions meant that unloading took even longer. In the case of many of the Beach Group vehicles and personnel this delay was not too serious since the enemy was still occupying the areas to which they were to move.

    73 LAA Regiment RA.
    218 Battery
    Battery Headquarters.
    This landed to control the LAA guns already ashore.
    1 15cwt GS.
    1 15cwt Water, Bedford.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Bedford.
    2 Motorcycles.
    13 men.

    93 LAA Regiment RA.
    322 Battery.
    For beach and exits
    1 Jeep with 3 crew. Reconnaissance party. Priority on Rhino Ferry.
    1 man with a motorcycle. Reconnaissance party. Carried on transport.
    1 Jeep with 3 crew.
    1 Motorcycle with 1 crew.


    103 HAA Regiment RA
    Headquarters.
    1 Jeep.
    1 15cwt FFW, Bedford.
    1 15cwt GS, Bedford.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Bedford.
    1 Water trailer.
    4 Motorcycle.
    32 men.

    322 Battery.
    Headquarters.
    2 15cwt GS, Bedford.
    1 15cwt Water, Bedford.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Bedford.
    1 Car 4 seater 4 X 4, Humber.
    1 3ton 6 X 4 Machinery, Leyland.
    2 Motorcycle.
    24 men.
    ‘A’ Troop
    7 HAA Tractors, Matador.
    4 3.7” HAA guns.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Bedford QL.
    1 Trailer Radar AA No1 MkII Transmitter.
    1 Trailer Radar AA No1 MkII Receiver.
    1 Trailer Radar AA No3 MkII.
    1 Generator Trailer 2 ton Lister 5KVa.
    2 motorcycle. Carried on vehicles.
    111 men.
    ‘B’ Troop.
    7 HAA Tractors, Matador.
    4 3.7” HAA guns.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Bedford QL.
    1 Trailer Radar AA No1 MkII Transmitter.
    1 Trailer Radar AA No1 MkII Receiver.
    1 Trailer Radar AA No3 MkII.
    1 Generator Trailer 2 ton Lister 5KVa.
    2 motorcycle. Carried on vehicles.
    111 men.


    324 Battery
    ‘E’ Troop.
    7 HAA Tractors, Matador.
    4 3.7” HAA guns.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Bedford QL.
    1 Trailer Radar AA No1 MkII Transmitter.
    1 Trailer Radar AA No1 MkII Receiver.
    1 Trailer Radar AA No3 MkII.
    1 Generator Trailer 2 ton Lister 5KVa.
    2 motorcycle. Carried on vehicles.
    111 men.

    C and D troops would land on Nan on D+1.



    71 Field Company RE.
    4 3ton Winch, Karrier.
    4 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    2 15cwt Compressor.
    1 M3A1 4 X 4 White.
    30 men.

    50 Mechanical Equipment Section.
    2 men. Advanced party.
    2 men. Advanced party.

    8 Angledozer Class III HD7.
    4 Angledozer Class II HD10.
    10 Jahn 8 ton trailer. Towed by dozers.
    2 20 ton SMT trailer.
    8 Scraper 4 yard Le Tourneau. Towed by D8 tractors of Beach Recovery Section REME.
    46 men

    9 Stores Section.
    2 men with one bicycle. Advanced Party.
    14 men with 1 motorcycle.

    91 Field Company RE
    4 men with 2 bicycles. Advanced Party.
    95 men with 4 airborne handcarts.
    4 3ton winch, Karrier.
    2 3 ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 3ton 6 X 4 Coles Crane.
    1 M14 Halftrack.
    2 15cwt Air Compressor.
    2 Jeep.
    1 Water Purification Trailer.
    5 motorcycle.
    53 men and 6 handcarts.

    722 Artisan Works Company.
    2 Jeeps with 4 crew. Reconnaissance party.
    2 men with 2 Motorcycles. Reconnaissance party.

    245 Provost Company
    2 Jeep towing 2 handcarts with 4 crew. Priority 1 for landing.
    4 Carrier Loyd personnel with 8 crew.
    10 men with 10 motorcycles.
    2 Jeep with 4 crew.
    2 Jeep towing 2 handcarts with 4 crew.

    1 Provost and Security Unit, ‘C’ Echelon. RAF.
    Provided a detachment to work with Beach Group traffic control in landing RAF personnel and vehicles. Sword was not intended to handle much RAF traffic.
    1 Jeep.
    1 3ton Tender, Crossley.
    5 men.

    9 Field Dressing Station.
    4 men with 2 bicycles. Advanced Party.
    60 men with a handcart.

    37 Field Surgical Unit.
    7 men.

    12 Field Dressing Station.
    56 men with a handcart.

    38 Field Surgical Unit.
    7 men.

    22 Field Transfusion Unit.
    3 men.

    2 Field Sanitary Section.
    A detachment of two serjeant sanitary inspectors to advise on water supply and general hygiene.
    1 man.

    20 Port Detachment RAMC.
    3 men.



    Port Units.
    Inland Water Transport Operating Companies.
    Inland Water Transport Operating Companies operated the Rhino Ferries which were towed across the Channel by the early groups of LSTs. The Rhino Ferry was to first unload the LST which towed it and then unload other LSTs which did not tow one. The personnel and vehicles were carried on the towing LST. A Pioneer Company was attached to assist.

    Rhino Ferries were very slow to discharge on D Day and D+1 mainly because of the heavy swell making beaching difficult and the breakdown of the power units. From an early stage it was necessary to arrange for an LCT or LCM to tow them into shore. This worked quite well.

    From D+2 the Rhinos were used to discharge Motor Transport. In calm seas and with their own power it was possible to make a round trip to LSTs a mile off shore in 3 hours. However in practice an average of 6 hours was needed. Later they suffered from loss of power units and ramps which made it difficult for them to discharge vehicles and they were used mainly to assist with the discharging of stores. In this role they could carry 330 tons of stores. They were beached and allowed to dry out. They could then discharge into three 3 ton lorries each side.

    940 Inland Water Transport Operating Company.
    4 Tractor Class I D8 with 9 crew.
    180 men.

    966 Inland Water Transport Operating Company.
    1 15cwt GS 4 X 2.
    1 3ton GS 4 X 2.
    10 men.


    Headquarters 9 Port Operating Group.
    1 Amphibious Jeep with 2 crew from Headquarters.

    Port Operating Company.
    7 Officers and 333 other ranks.
    - Responsible for discharging of all ships except HM ships.
    - Personnel arrive by coaster, 28 men on each. After discharging their ship they remain on shore with the Beach Group and are available to discharge the next ships to come in.
    - Responsible for constructing any piers for unloading stores or vehicles.


    1032 Port Operating Company.
    This company is trained to unload vehicles from Motor Transport Coasters and Motor Transport Ships. They arrive with the first wave of vessels and remain to unload subsequent vessels.
    1 Amphibious Jeep with 4 crew. Reconnaissance Group.

    D+1
    2 gangs arrive with each Motor Transport Coaster to discharge vehicles onto lighters
    211 men from 1032 Port Operating Company RE. 16 Gangs for discharging vehicles.
    1 15cwt GS Ford with 1 crew.
    1 Trailer fire pump.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 1 crew.


    999 Port Operating Company.
    1 Amphibious Jeep with 4 crew. Reconnaissance Group.
    D+1
    3 Excavator 3/8 yard RB 10.
    2 Excavator 5/8 yard RB 19.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, towing water trailer.
    1 Amphibious Jeep.
    27 men.

    1025 Port Operating Company.
    1 Amphibious Jeep with 2 crew. Reconnaissance Group.

    1028 Port Operating Company RE.
    3 Excavator 3/8 yard RB 10.
    2 Excavator 5/8 yard RB 19.
    8 men.

    D+1
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 water trailer.
    1 amphibious Jeep.
    36 men.

    1056 Port Operating Company RE.
    D+1
    1 Amphibious Jeep.
    1 3ton 4 X 2 GS.
    1 Trailer Fire pump.
    1 water trailer. To be towed by a vehicle of 722 Artisan Works Company.
    25 men.


    1057 Port Operating Company RE.
    D+1
    1 Amphibious Jeep.
    1 water trailer. Towed by 3ton lorry of 84 Field Company.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS towing a fire pump trailer.
    32 men.


    1050 Port Maintenance Company RE.
    D+1
    2 Car 2 seater 4 X 2 Austin.
    1 15cwt GS.
    15cwt 4 X 2 Compressor.
    4 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 Welding trailer.
    145 men.

    Headquarters Port Construction and Repair Group.
    D+1
    1 car 2 seater 4 X 2.
    6 men.


    3 Division units.

    106 bridging Company RASC
    The Bailey Bridge and Pontoon Platoons land for the River Orne and Caen Canal bridges .
    1623 Platoon (Bailey).
    17 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford, with 35 crew. Panels.
    3 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford, with 6 crew. Over normal length by 1 foot.
    6 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford, with 12 crew. Over normal length by 5 foot 6inches.
    4 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford, with 8 crew. Over normal length by 7 foot.

    1624 Platoon (pontoon)
    Did not land on D Day but waited off shore until the afternoon of D+1
    9 3ton 6 X 4 GS, Albion, with 18 crew. Limited to 27 foot 6 inches. End pontoons.
    6 3ton 6 X 4 GS, Albion, with 12 crew. Centre pontoons.
    2 Trailer 8 ton, Dominion. Motor Boat trailers.


    1 South Lancashire Regiment.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS CMP, Chevrolet, with 2 crew.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.
    2 Motorcycle with 2 crew.
    2 men.

    1 Suffolk Regiment.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP) with 2 crew.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.
    2 Motorcycle with 2 crew.
    2 men.

    2 Kings Shropshire Light Infantry.
    1 15cwt GS 4 X 4 (CMP) with 2 crew.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.
    1 Motorcycle.
    8 men.

    2 Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP) with 2 crew.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.

    1 Royal Norfolk Regiment.
    1 15cwt GS 4 X 4 (CMP) with 2 crew.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.

    2 Lincolnshire Regiment.
    1 15cwt GS 4 X 4 (CMP) with 2 crew.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.

    3 Division Provost Company attached to 8 Brigade.
    3 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP) with 6 crew.
    1 Heavy Utility 4 X 4, Humber, with 3 crew.
    3 15cwt GS, Bedford with 6 crew.
    1 Jeep with 1 crew.
     
  10. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    SWORD BEACH.
    H+16 Hours.

    Three LSTs will beach and dry out before unloading.
    This was not considered safe because of the risk of damage on uneven beaches and the risk of enemy artillery fire. It was decided to beach these LSTs in order to get their loads of vehicles ashore as a priority.

    3 Division units.
    20 AT Regiment Headquarters.
    2 Carrier Loyd with 10 crew from Headquarters
    3 men from.

    41 AT Battery
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 4 crew.
    2 Motorcycle with 2 crew.
    8 men.

    16 Fire Control Post RA.
    This was to control the fire of units supporting the airborne division. The guns would not be in the divisions area but would be firing from 3 Divisions area and include field and medium batteries (65 Medium Regiment). Forward Observation Officers were also provided.
    6 men.

    53 Medium Regiment.
    The gun areas should already be laid out and the troops can move straight into their firing positions.
    Battery
    Troop
    5 Medium Artillery Tractors, Matador.
    4 5.5” guns.
    1 Carrier Universal.
    1 M3A1 White 15cwt.
    1 15cwt FFW.
    Troop
    5 Medium Artillery Tractors, Matador.
    4 5.5” guns.
    1 Carrier Universal.
    1 M3A1 White 15cwt.
    1 15cwt FFW.

    Battery
    Troop
    5 Medium Artillery Tractors, Matador.
    4 5.5” guns.
    1 Carrier Universal.
    1 M3A1 White 15cwt.
    1 15cwt FFW.
    Troop
    5 Medium Artillery Tractors, Matador.
    4 5.5” guns.
    1 Carrier Universal.
    1 M3A1 White 15cwt.
    1 15cwt FFW

    Distribution unknown.
    19 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    2 Jeep.
    3 15cwt water.
    7 Motorcycle. Carried in transport.
    1 Breakdown Tractor, Scammell.
    504 men.








    5 Assault Regiment Royal Engineers.
    Headquarters.
    4 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP).
    7 Motorcycle.
    31 men.

    77 Assault Squadron RE.
    3 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford.
    2 Motorcycle.
    9 men.

    79 Assault Squadron RE.
    3 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford.
    2 Motorcycle.
    9 men.

    HQ CRE 3 Division.
    1 Light Reconnaissance Car, Humber, with 3 crew.

    106 bridging Company.
    9 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford. 5 foot 6 inches over normal length.
    5 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford. 7 foot over normal length.
    3 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford.
    1 3ton 6 X 4 Coles Crane.
    30 men.

    9 Brigade Light Aid Detachment.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 3ton 6 X 4 Breakdown, Leyland.
    1 Motorcycle.
    12 men.


    Beach Group units.
    93 LAA Regiment.
    322 Battery.
    For the beaches and exits.
    ‘I’ Troop.
    3 Crusader SP triple 20mm AA.
    2 triple 20mm AA guns.
    1 Tractor LAA 4 X 4, Bedford.
    1 airborne motorcycle.
    67 men.
    ‘H’ Troop.
    3 Crusader SP triple 20mm AA.
    2 triple 20mm AA guns.
    1 Tractor LAA 4 X 4, Bedford.
    1 airborne motorcycle.
    67 men.

    Commander RE GHQ Troops Engineers.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew from

    71 Field Company
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew.

    50 Mechanical Equipment.
    2 Angledozer Class III HD7.
    2 Jahn 8 ton trailer. Towed by dozers.
    8 men.

    1028 Port Operating Company RE.
    3 Excavator 3/8 yard RB 10.
    2 Excavator 5/8 yard RB 19.
    8 men.

    1028 Port Operating Company RE.
    3 Excavator 3/8 yard RB 10.
    2 Excavator 5/8 yard RB 19.
    8 men.


    6 Beach Group.
    1 man from 21 Army Group Movement Control Pool. Military Landing Officer, 6 Beach Group.
    1 man from 21 Army Group Movement Control Pool. Assistant Military Landing Officer, 6 Beach Group.
    5 men from 21 Army Group Movement Control Pool. Includes Assistant Military Landing Officer for liaison with Senior Officer Ferry Command 6 Beach Group.

    26 men from ‘A’ echelon, 17 Movement Control Group.
    1 Heavy Utility 4 X 2, Ford, with 1 crew from ‘A’ Echelon 17 Movement Control Group.
    1 Motorcycle with 1 crew from ‘A’ Echelon 17 Movement Control Group.
    1 Jeep with 1 crew from ‘A’ Echelon, 17 Movement Control Group RE.

    9 Field Dressing Station.
    1 Jeep.
    1 15cwt Water, Bedford.
    4 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 Heavy Ambulance, 4 stretcher, Austin.
    2 Motorcycle.
    15 men.

    37 Field Surgical Unit.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.
    10 men.

    12 Field Dressing Station.
    1 Heavy Ambulance 4 stretcher, Austin.
    4 3ton GS 4 X 4, Austin.
    1 15cwt Water.
    1 Jeep.
    2 Motorcycle.
    22 men.

    22 Field Transfusion Unit.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 1 crew.

    38 Field Surgical Unit.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.
    10 men.

    2 Field Sanitary Section.
    1 man with a motorcycle. serjeant sanitary inspector to advise on water supply and general hygiene.

    55 Field Surgical Unit RAMC.
    7 men.

    29 Field Transfusion Unit RAMC.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 Bedford QL Refrigerator Type ‘C’ with 2 crew.

    6 Advanced Depot, Medical Stores RAMC.
    2 men.

    12 Ordnance Beach Detachment.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP) with 2 crew.
    1 Motorcycle with 1 crew.
    2 3ton 6 X 4 Coles Crane with 6 crew.

    44 Ordnance Ammunition Company.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 3 crew.


    299 GT Company DUKW
    1 Breakdown Tractor, Scammell, with 4 crew.
    1 3ton Workshop, Albion, with 4 crew.

    39 GT Company
    1 3ton GS, Albion, with 2 crew.
    1 3ton Workshop, Albion, with 2 crew.
    1 3ton Breakdown, Albion, with 2 crew.

    96 Detail Issue Depot.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 1 crew.
    3 Motorcycle with 3 crew. Carried in transport.

    138 Detail Issue Depot
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew. Carry two motorcycles.
    1 Motorcycle with 1 crew.
    1 3ton Coles Crane with 3 crew.
    34 men with 3 handcarts.

    21 Beach Recovery Section.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 2 crew.
    1 Sherman III ARV with 5 crew.

    120 Pioneer Company.
    1 15cwt with 2 crew.

    85 Pioneer Company.
    2 Jeep with 2 crew.
    52 men.

    149 Pioneer Company.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew.
    24 men.


    Unloading LSTs will continue through the night. A further group will arrive at H+22 hours. Motor Transport Coasters will also arrive and unload using ferry craft. Stores are also arriving by coaster.
     
  11. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    SWORD BEACH.
    H+22 Hours.
    Four LSTs arrive. These do not have Rhino Ferries. The DUKWs that they carry will be launched on arrival. The remainder of the vehicles will be landed by Rhino Ferries when available.

    Beach Group units
    101 General Transport Company RASC.
    33 2½ ton Amphibious DUKW.
    1 Heavy Recovery Tractor, Scammell.
    1 Jeep.
    83 men.

    299 General Transport Company RASC.
    33 2½ ton Amphibious DUKW with 20 crew.
    2 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP)
    100 men.

    39 General Transport Company RASC.
    39 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 Albion.
    1 Albion 6 X 4 Breakdown.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP).
    1 15cwt water.
    1 Humber Heavy Utility 4 X 4.
    1 jeep.
    68 men.

    38 General Transport Company RASC.
    12 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 3ton 6 X 4 Workshop.
    1 15cwt Water.
    30 men.

    237 Petrol Depot RASC.
    1 3ton 6 X 4 Coles Crane with 3 crew.

    96 Detail Issue Depot RASC.
    1 3ton 6 X 4 Coles Crane with 3 crew.

    129 Pioneer Company.
    1 15cwt GS with 2 crew from Headquarters

    267 Pioneer Company.
    1 Car 2 seater 4 X 2.
    1 15cwt GS 4 X 2.
    8 men.

    11 Ordnance Beach Detachment RAOC.
    1 3ton 6 X 4 Coles Crane with 3 crew.

    12 Ordnance Beach Detachment RAOC.
    1 Jeep with 1 crew.

    5 Beach Group. 5 Kings Regiment.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS (CMP) from Administrative Platoon.
    1 jeep from ‘D’ Company.
    1 Jeep.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    6 men.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Port Operating Group Representatives Increment, 5 Beach Group.

    6 Beach Group. 1 Buckinghamshire Regiment.
    3 Jeeps.
    1 15cwt water.
    8 men.
    1 Jeep with 2 crew from Port Operating Group Representatives Increment, 6 Beach Group.


    Headquarters 101 Beach Sub Area.
    1 jeep with 2 crew.

    Light Mobile Signal Section RN.
    2 15cwt 19 foot 1 inch by 6 foot 2 inch by 8 foot 9 inch.
    1 3ton 21 foot by 7 foot 8 inch by 11 foot 4 inch.
    1 trailer 9 foot 7 inch by 5 foot 5 inch by 5 foot 3 inch.
    11 men.

    Local Duplex Section RN.
    4 8cwt Morris PU with 16 crew
    2 8cwt Morris PU with 8 crew from Local Duplex Section RN.

    Radar RN.
    1 3ton 18 foot 6 inches by 7 foot 2 inches by 10 foot 6 inches with 6 crew towing trailer
    Trailer 15 foot by 7 foot 6 inches by 8 foot 4 inches.
    1 3ton 18 foot 6 inches by 7 foot 2 inches by 9 foot 6 inches with 4 crew.

    Landing Craft Repair Unit RN.
    1 Tractor Class I D8 with 3 crew.
    1 Crane, Le Tourneau. Tracked. Towed by D8.
    1 Jeep towing a welding set trailer.
    1 2½ ton Amphibious DUKW.
    12 men.




    3 Division units

    Headquarters 3 Division.
    1 Heavy Utility 4 X 4, Humber.
    1 15cwt water.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    12 men.
    2 Jeeps and 7 men from Headquarters 3 Division. AQ, orderlies and clerks.

    1 15cwt Bedford with 4 crew from Headquarters RA 3 Division.
    3 men and a handcart from divisional signals.

    3 Division Signals.
    1 Heavy Utility 4 X 4, Humber. Cipher Office.
    1 Jeep carrying an airborne trailer.
    7 men.

    33 Field Security Section.
    1 15cwt 4 X 2 GS Ford with 2 crew.
    5 motorcycle with 5 crew.

    3 Division Ordnance Field Park.
    4 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 8 crew.

    106 Bridge Company RASC.
    17 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford.
    4 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford. 7 foot over normal length.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Ford. 5 1/2 foot over normal length.
    11 3ton 6 X 4 GS, Albion. Limited to 27 foot 3 inches.
    2 15cwt water, Bedford.
    64 men.

    102 Corps Provost Company.
    2 Light Utility, Austin 10 HP.
    11 Motorcycles.
    15 men.

    104 Corps Reception Camp.
    1 man with 1 motorcycle from 3 Divisional Section.


    5 Assault Regiment RE.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS Ford with 8 crew from Headquarters
    1 Churchill ARV.
    1 Heavy Recovery Tractor, Scammell.
    9 men.

    736 Light Composite Company RASC.
    For 6 Airborne Division.
    15 Jeeps from Carry airborne trailers.
    6 Motorcycle.
    104 men.
     
  12. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    SWORD BEACH.
    H+24 hours.

    9 LCI(L) arrive. They will land on Queen as directed.
    These craft carry 12 Devonshire Regiment, which will pass through to 6 Airborne Division, and reinforcements.

    12 Devonshire Regiment (6 Airborne Division).
    637 men with
    32 handcarts.
    18 motorcycle. Lightweight James.
    6 bicycles.

    3 Division Units
    5 men from 3 Division Postal Unit.
    8 men from 3 Divisional Section, 104 Corp Reception Camp.

    5 men from 67 Anti Tank Battery RA.

    6 men from 1 Suffolk Regiment.
    6 men from 2 East Yorkshire Regiment.
    6 men from 1 South Lancashire Regiment.

    4 men from 45 Anti Tank Battery RA.

    171 men from 129 Pioneer Company.

    420 Reinforcements.
     
  13. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    SWORD BEACH
    H+25½ hours

    Eight Motor Transport Coasters arrive. They anchor at the Lowering Point and are discharged by ferry craft. Each coaster carried two gangs from 1032 Port Operating Company to carry out the unloading.

    3 Division units
    2 East Yorkshire Regiment.
    4 Carrier Universal from
    6 Carrier Loyd.
    2 15cwt 4 X 4 GS, CMP.
    54 men.

    1 South Lancashire Regiment.
    4 Carrier Universal.
    6 Carrier Loyd.
    2 15cwt 4 X 4 GS, CMP.
    54 men.

    1 Suffolk Regiment.
    7 Carrier Universal.
    6 Carrier Loyd.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 GS, CMP.
    64 men.

    2 Warwickshire Regiment.
    6 Carrier Universal.
    2 15cwt 4 X 4 GS, CMP.
    28 men.

    12 Royal Ulster Rifles.
    6 carrier Loyd.
    2 15cwt 4 X 4 GS, CMP.
    28 men.

    2 Kings Shropshire Light Infantry.
    6 Carrier Loyd.
    2 15cwt 4 X 4 GS, CMP.
    29 men.

    2 Lincolnshire Regiment.
    3 Carrier Loyd.
    3 Carrier Universal.
    2 15cwt 4 X 4 GS, CMP.
    28 men.

    1 Norfolk Regiment.
    7 Carrier Universal.
    6 Carrier Loyd.
    2 15cwt 4 X 4 GS, CMP.
    56 men.

    Kings Own Scottish Borderers.
    3 Carrier Universal.
    3 Carrier Loyd.
    2 15cwt 4 X 4 GS, CMP.
    28 men.

    2 Middlesex Regiment.
    26 Carrier Universal.
    2 15cwt WT 4 X 2, Guy Ant.
    109 men.

    12 Devonshire Regiment.
    For 6 Airborne Division.
    8 Jeeps towing 6pdr Anti Tank guns MkIV (airborne model)
    40 Jeeps carrying 10cwt trailers.
    3 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 10cwt ambulance trailer.


    27 Armoured Brigade.
    1 jeep from Headquarters.
    1 15cwt Water, Bedford, from Headquarters.
    1 Scout Car, Humber, from Headquarters.
    1 M14 Halftrack from Headquarters.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, from Headquarters.
    16 men from Headquarters.
    1 jeep from 27 Armoured Brigade Signals.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, from 27 Armoured Brigade Signals.
    12 men from 27 Armoured Brigade Signals.

    45 Anti Tank Battery RA.
    12 Carrier Universal towing 8 6pdr anti tank guns with 62 crew.

    67 Anti Tank Battery RA.
    5 Carrier Universal towing 4 6pdr anti tank guns with 25 crew.

    3 Division Signals.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 Lorry Command Vehicle, Bedford QL.
    6 Light Utility, Austin 10.
    2 Jeeps.
    7 Jeep, Line Laying, carrying an airborne trailer.
    3 jeep towing 10cwt trailers.
    3 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 Heavy Utility 4 X 4 Humber.
    1 15cwt Bedford.
    1 15cwt Office, Morris.
    81 men.



    Beach Group units.
    39 General Transport Company RASC.
    11 3ton 4 X 4 GS , Austin, with 23 crew.

    745 Army Tipper Company RASC.
    13 3ton 4 X 2 Tipper, Dennis, with 36 crew.
    1 2 seater Utility, Austin 10 with 2 crew.
    1 15cwt GS Ford with 2 crew.
    1 15cwt Water, Bedford, with 2 crew.

    722 Artisan Works Company RE.
    7 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 14 crew.
    1 water trailer from 1056 Port Operating Company. Towed by a lorry above.
    1 15cwt GS 4 X 2 with 2 crew.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew.

    1028 Port Operating Company RE.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 water trailer.
    1 amphibious Jeep.
    6 men.

    1032 Port Operating Company RE
    211 men. Gangs for discharging vehicles.
    1 15cwt GS Ford with one crew from 1032 Port Operating Company RE.
    1 Trailer fire pump from 1032 Port Operating Company RE.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin, with 1 crew from 1032 Port Operating Company RE.

    50 Mechanical Equipment Section RE.
    3 3ton 4 X 2 Tipper, Dennis.
    3 Dumper 2 yards, Muirhill, from 50 Mechanical Equipment Section RE.
    6 men from 50 Mechanical Equipment Section RE.
    1 15cwt water trailer from 50 Mechanical Equipment Section RE.


    1056 Port Operating Company RE.
    1 Amphibious Jeep with 2 crew.
    1 3ton 4 X 2 GS with 2 crew.
    1 Trailer Fire pump.
    1 water trailer. To be towed by a vehicle of 722 Artisan Works Company.

    1050 Port Maintenance Company RE.
    1 Light Utility, Austin.
    2 3ton 4 X 2 GS.
    1 welding trailer.
    6 men.

    Landing Craft Recovery Unit. RN.
    1 Lorry 30cwt GS towing a Trailer pump, Dennis, with 7 crew.

    11 Ordnance Beach Detachment RAOC.
    1 3ton 6 X 4 Coles Crane with 3 crew from
     
    Michel Sabarly and Aixman like this.
  14. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    SWORD BEACH
    H+ 36½ hours.
    Two Motor Transport Coasters.
    Serial 3150 is a MTC carrying

    1032 Port Operating Company RE
    27 men. 2 Gangs for discharging vehicles.
    27 men. 2 Gangs for discharging vehicles.

    84 Field Company RE.
    2 jeep
    1 15cwt.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 Trailer, water purification, Stella.
    7 men.

    1057 Port Operating Company RE.
    1 water trailer. Towed by 3ton lorry of 84 Field Company.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS towing a fire pump trailer.
    21 men.

    91 Field Company RE.
    1 15cwt water.
    2 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Austin.
    1 Trailer, water purification, Stella.
    6 men.

    237 Petrol Depot RASC.
    1 Jeep, Willys, with 2 crew.

    5 Kings Regiment. Beach Group.
    2 jeep.
    2 Carrier Loyd.
    6 men.

    1 Buckinghamshire Regiment. Beach Group.
    1 jeep.
    2 Carrier Loyd.
    6 men.

    1 water trailer 180 gallon from 21 Beach Recovery Section. To be towed by Loyd Carrier from 1 Bucks.

    CRASC Lines of Communication.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS, Bedford QL.
    1 Heavy Utility, Humber.
    3 men.


    Staff Captains Increment.
    1 Jeep (Willys) with one crew.

    11 Ordnance Beach Detachment RAOC.
    1 Jeep (Willys).

    Air Support Signals Unit.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 Wireless House or 15cwt RAF Wireless with 4 crew. For HQ 3 Div.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 Wireless House or 15cwt RAF Wireless with 4 crew. For HQ 8 Brigade.
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 Wireless House or 15cwt RAF Wireless with 4 crew. For HQ 185 Brigade.

    9 Survey Regiment RA.
    3 Jeep from Headquarters Troop.
    1 3ton 4 X 4 GS Bedford QL, from Headquarters Troop,
    1 15cwt 4 X 4 White, from Headquarters Troop.
    20 men from Headquarters Troop.

    5 Jeep from ‘A’ Survey Battery.
    2 15cwt 4 X 2 FFW, Bedford from ‘A’ Survey Battery.
    2 15cwt office Ford, from ‘A’ Survey Battery.
    7 motorcycles from ‘A’ Survey Battery.
    66 men from ‘A’ Survey Battery, 9 Survey Regiment RA.

    245 Anti Tank Battery (M10 troop) RA.
    2 Jeep
    1 15cwt Starting and Charging, Bedford or Ford.
    1 15cwt 4 X 2 GS.
    1 15cwt Water.
    1 motorcycle.
    18 men.

    Headquarters 1 SS Brigade.
    1 15cwt Water with 1 crew from

    6 Airborne Division
    5 Jeeps carrying 2 airborne trailers with 15 crew for 716 Light Composite Company RASC.
    2 15cwt GS with 4 crew from 2 Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 2 Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 1 Royal Ulster Rifles.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 12 Devonshire Regiment.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 8 Parachute Battalion.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 1 Canadian Parachute Battalion.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 195 Air Landing Field Ambulance RAMC.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 225 Parachute Field Ambulance RAMC.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 224 Parachute Field Ambulance RAMC.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 1 Royal Irish Rifles.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 9 Parachute Battalion.
    1 15cwt Water with 2 crew from 249 Field Company (Airborne).

    This concludes serials landing under the orders of 3 Division. Serials have also been landing on Nan under 3 Canadian Division and I Corps for 3 Division and 6 Airborne Division.

    THE END
    of the Landing Tables.
     
    Gold and Aixman like this.
  15. Pak75

    Pak75 Member

    Mike

    Again, fantastic work.

    Your post 'Developing the Beach' contains a nugget of info that 7 DD tanks were stranded at high tide and adding to congestion on the beach. Assuming this is not a reference to swamped tanks which by then would have been largely submerged, then this may well explain the large number of 13/18 Hussar casualties. The tanks were not knocked out but temporarily bogged, so were likely to be only X or Y category for repairs.
    As A squadron is largely accounted for, most if not all of these tanks must be B squadron as C squadron landed and exited beach without any losses.

    Strange that Miller's History makes no mention of this, nor quotes exact numbers of tanks lost and surviving D-day. He mentions some tanks being swamped but that is it.

    My info re revised landing tables is that LTIN 222 (LCT 898) was added when two tanks were off loaded 3 June from original three LCTS which were overloaded. 13/18 Hussar WD makes reference to this and says that regiment had pointed this out before to Naval authorities with no response (WD 3 June).

    May well try and get some more info from Kew...

    Cheers
     
  16. Hello Pak75,

    Are you sure of that? I haven't seen any official document mentioning such a 'spare tk' supposedly added to each sqn of 13/18 H yet. It's true that various other docs speak of 20 tks in each sqn, but they all seem to come from the same (so far) unidentified source.

    The reason I ask is precisely the tank state:
    - or that the initial number of tanks in each squadron was 19 tanks, not 20!

    In my view it is still not definitely clear whether A & B sqn had 19 or 20 tks to start with, but I'm only too willing to be proved wrong either way!

    Michel
     
  17. tmac

    tmac Senior Member

    Congratulations on a fantastic piece of work, Mike. It makes really interesting reading.

    I wonder if I could give you a bit more information and point out a possible error.

    At H plus 330, you record 318 LAA Regiment RA, 2 men with 2 motorcycles.

    These two men were Captain Robert Tennant Reid and Sergeant Francis Connor of F Troop, 318 Battery, 92nd LAA. They went forward ahead of the troop to reconnoitre positions for their guns around Pegasus Bridge and Horsa Bridge – which the troop was tasked with defending.

    At H Plus 390, you record 93 LAA Regiment RA and 318 LAA Battery.

    92nd LAA was 3rd Division’s LAA regiment.

    92nd and 93rd LAA were both converted infantry battalions of The Loyal Regiment.

    According to the Loyals’ official history, 93rd LAA did not arrive in Normandy until June 8 and June 9. The only unit of either regiment to land in Normandy on D-Day was F Troop of 92nd LAA.

    F Troop consisted of six SP Bofors Guns. Three guns were carried in LCT 405 and the other three in LCT 408. They were scheduled to land at 1.30pm opposite Colleville, but were delayed by shellfire and became separated.

    LCT 405 landed in its designated position at 2.30pm. LCT 408 landed at La Breche d’Hermanville around the same time.

    92nd LAA HQ and the remaining two troops of 318 Battery were due to arrive in Normandy on June 7 to reinforce F Troop. But the liberty ship Sambut, on which they were travelling, was sunk by German shellfire just off Dover.
     
  18. Pak75

    Pak75 Member

    HI Michel

    The primary document I have is War diary.
    WD for 6 June gives tank state at end of day as 32 + 31 tanks casualties = 63

    As you know, official organisation armoured regiment 1944 (see Trux etc) is 3 squadrons of 19 plus 4 tanks in RHQ = 61 cruisers, so 13/18 Hussars have two more than normal on D-day.

    Other evidence:
    (i) 4 LCT Mk III each carrying 5 tanks were used by each squadron to transport DD tanks (LCTs from 14th LCT Flotilla) = 20 tanks per squadron.
    (ii) History of 13/18th Royal Hussars QMO 1922-1947 C Miller 1949 (ex 13/18 Hussars) says that 40 DD tanks were employed (p99)
    (iii) Miller D-day organisation chart (p187) has 20 tanks per DD squadron in 4 troops of 4 plus 4 in SHQ.
    (IV) LF Ellis - Victory in West (1962) p 184 also says 40 tanks were used.

    IMHO Ellis is not best source but I would expect regimental history 1949 to be correct - perhaps this is the source you mention. This plus 4 x LCT mk III load of 5 tanks leads me to this conclusion.

    There are anomalies as you point out and I have alluded to in my post. Specifically:
    • C squadron apparently had 20 tanks as well (extra Firefly as mentioned in loading tables for C squadron) so that would make total for regiment of 64 with three additional tanks...
    • the two concrete buster Fireflies rejoined regiment during the day - were they included in status report at end of the day?
    • Were the two tanks that went back to the UK included in casualty list as technically they were not 'lost' to the regiment?
    Last anomaly could cancel out arrival of concrete busters but that still leaves C squadron overstrength.

    I understand how myths are perpetuated from author to author and from website to website but in this case I did go back to regimental history of 1949 (only a secondary source admitedly) so if Miller is wrong, this would be a very long running mistake!

    Perhaps the war diary appendices have more info. Have you seen these? Do you have any other primary docs to support the 38 tank theory?
    I am quite prepared to get these copied but unfortunately this is not a guarantee of finding solution. I am still looking for answer as to how many tanks 2nd Northants lost in Operation Goodwood..... not even Northampton museum archives could help!

    Cheers
     
  19. Arty

    Arty Member

    Pak75,

    Regards the tank strength and structure of 13/18th Hussars on 6Jun44, as Mike stated this argument has been going for many years. The sources that guru’s like Michel Sabarly (and mortals like myself) are using invariably go beyond the interpretations of authors past or present. Without getting into book reviews, Miller was attempting to cover 25 years of the units history, a huge undertaking. Regimental Histories are a good source of research material, however much of it is not technical but anecdotal - some of which is akin to Hollywood screenplays! Whereas chaps like Anderson, with access to archives etc, have been far more methodical in their approach.

    I’m not going to my list sources - suffice to say it is every scrap of info I can get my hands on - whether it’s War Diaries, Official reports, veterans memoirs etc. However it is overly apparent that none of these sources are 100% accurate. I’ve seen all the evidence you’re quoting over & over again (and then some!).

    The structure of British (& Canadian) Armoured Regiments was in a state of change in June 44 with the introduction of the 17pdr equipped Sherman Vc. Some Regiments were running four Sherman Vc’s in four troops, others five Vc’s in Five Troops, others concentrated all their Vc’s in one Squadron (until that proved to be folly). The “4 troop 4 tank basis with 4 in SHQ” was the theoretical structure at the time. As for the Regiments equipped with two Squadrons of DD’s there were yet more variations. There is evidence that A & B Sqn’s 13/18th Hussars in particular were still operating with Five Troops in late June.

    Insofar as the number of DD’s deployed by A & B Sqns 13/18th Hussars is concerned, after much time, effort & debate I’ve come to the conclusion that they probably had 20 DD’s. Having said that there is ample evidence to suggest that they only had 19!

    Regards losses on the day, I believe we can get close to the answer. I do believe A Sqn got 5 DD’s out of the water that morning. B Squadron had at least 15 & possibly 17 DD’s leave the water.

    I do have questions for you. How did you deduce that, not one, but two DD‘s went back to England? And, how did you conclude the reference to the seven stranded DD’s is specifically B Sqn tanks? The reference is to AFV’s, landing craft etc that were blocking the exits off the beach ie. Queen White and Queen Red.

    As for C Squadron, yes it’s structure was four Troops of four tanks plus SHQ of four tanks. The Squadron was originally to be carried on three LCT’s. The original First Tide Landing Table (accurate as of 19 March 44) is on this forum (courtesy of lots of work by Michel S.). By 06Jun44 there had been numerous changes & additions to the Landing Table. Mike’s monumental effort on this thread provides an update to 06 June 44. However there’s an LCT missing. That is indeed the extra LCT that was added, when on 03Jun44, higher authority finally understood that the LCT’s carrying C Sqn, RHQ et al were badly overloaded.

    Meanwhile, if you’re going to Kew, dig up the 14th LCT Flotilla’s after action report - it might just solve the ‘spare’ DD issue for good!

    Arty
     
  20. Trux

    Trux 21 AG Patron

    tmac,

    Thank you for your kind comments and input.

    Errors can occur for a huge range of reasons from changes in the orders to me pressing the wrong key but:

    Appendix 'J' to Royal Artillery 3 Division Operational Order No 1, 15th May gives

    93 LAA Regiment landing
    6 X 20mm, triple (3 tracked and 3 trailers) for defence of the beaches.
    12 X 20mm triple (6 tracked and 6 trailers) for defence of beaches and exits.
    All fairly early on D Day but no times given.

    I must admit that I wondered if I had pressed the wrong key but apparently not. Another mystery to look into. A wise, but cynical, man once said that almost everything you know about history is wrong. I begin to believe it.

    Keep in touch.

    Mike
     

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