Strange Vehicles.

Discussion in 'The Barracks' started by von Poop, Jan 5, 2007.

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  1. Kyt

    Kyt Very Senior Member

  2. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    Now these one's I would have loved to drive!
     
  3. Kyt

    Kyt Very Senior Member

    I found these at:

    Argghhh! The Home Of Two Of Jonah's Military Guys..: Historical Stuff Archives

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    The Tsar Tank was designed and built in 1915. It was one of the largest attempts at tank-building during the war, reputedly weighing in at a lean(!) 40 tons. In comparison, the Brit Marks I-IV of the 1st World War weighed in at a sprightly 28 tons. The German A7V weighed around 33 tons. The French St. Chamond weighed 22 tons, while the other major large French tank, the Schneider, came in at 14 tons. It wasn't until the Mark VIIs, the "Liberty" tanksjointly designed by the Brits and US did anyone else approach the 40 ton mark that I'm aware of (but who knows, lots of people were tinkering back in the day). This sucker had two huge wheels each driven by it's own 250 hp motor. It had two small wheels in the rear. Some sources suggest the guns were placed outside the wheels, others suggest that machine guns in the small turret were all the armament. I've never seen a photo or drawing showing weapons on this baby - they may have realized what a clunker it was before they bothered. Two prototypes were made but they proved unable to handle mud (I can't imagine crossing a shell-pocked battlefield in one of these) and high costs caused the project to be cancelled, mercifully, in 1916. These photos show a partially scrapped vehicle without wheels in the rear. The last of the two was dismantled for scrap in 1923.

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    In 1957 the Russians developed a prototype of a new heavy tank. Take a look at that body and those quad tracks. It was intended to lower the ground pressure of this vehicle, to give it better cross-country mobility in soft ground. I'm sure if it had ever made it into service, crews would have hated it. Twice the track to break. The hull was intended to protecting it against HEAT ammunition by deflecting the rounds. Putatively this shape would also assist in preventing the vehicle from being overturned by a tactical nuke blast. I'm sceptical of that, but... hey, maybe they did the modeling. It was canceled by Khruschev in favor of his preference - missile tanks. I believe they built two of these - the survivor is at the Tank Museum in Kubinka, near Moscow.

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    This sucker had removeable outer tracks, which could be towed behind the vehicle so it would be able to cross narrow bridges in Europe. Also intended for breaching the Siegfried Line, we only built two before cancelling the project, and the survivor today sits outside the Patton Armor Museum at Fort Knox.

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  4. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Some doubt as to whether the Tsar tank really existed, it seems likely that the famous photographs in fact show a full size wooden mock-up incapable of movement.

    Got to love the swamp-tank, twin tracks always seem designed to make changing/repairing them a nightmare, imagine doing it in a swamp?

    British cousin to the T28/95:
    The tortoise, as preserved at Bovington:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

  6. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Love his models. (and books)
    Not just the skill in making but in photographing them too.
     
  7. adrian roberts

    adrian roberts Senior Member

    Not really a vehicle, but the posting about the one-wheel tank reminded me of the panjandrum.

    A device with two huge wheels, driven by rockets set all round the rims, carrying a canister of explosive, designed to be driven off the ramp of a landing craft to attack beach fortifications; steered by a bloke holding two cords that unwound, like flying a kite.

    I learned about this the other night when I caught part of a programme on UKTV History - there was a similar, one-wheel device in an episode of Dad's Army: I thought that it was purely a comic invention until now
     

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  8. Kyt

    Kyt Very Senior Member

    Yes, the panjandrum was certainly a strange concept - unfortunately, just like in Dad's Army, it was just as dangerous for one's own troops as the enemy!!
     
  9. Herroberst

    Herroberst Senior Member

    My Dad used to go up Mt Fuji in one of these:

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    Luckily, some things don't get past the drawing board:

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    Ahhh...So that's where Spielberg got the idea from;)


    There's also the civilian version
    [​IMG]

    :cheers:
     

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  10. BulgarianSoldier

    BulgarianSoldier Senior Member

    Von Poop this british tsar tank looks like the german jagdtiger.Isnt the british stole something ? :D
     
  11. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    The Tsar tank isn't British, it's a Russian mad idea :lol:
     
  12. BulgarianSoldier

    BulgarianSoldier Senior Member

    The Tsar tank isn't British, it's a Russian mad idea :lol:
    Yeah i should have guess.Tsar is the same as King but used by the east coutrys (barberians! :D).And such a big and beutifull tank cant be british (sorry 'lads' but your tanks just sux nothing personal).But the problem that this tank was stolen remains it really look like jagdtiger! The germans should sue the russians :Cartangry: :D :D
     
  13. Kitty

    Kitty Very Senior Member

    Our tanks may suck now, but in Gulf War 1 we showed the high tech Yanks a thing or two. Oh, those were the days
     
  14. BulgarianSoldier

    BulgarianSoldier Senior Member

    Our tanks may suck now, but in Gulf War 1 we showed the high tech Yanks a thing or two. Oh, those were the days
    Your tanks may sucked during ww2 but this was compensaid with the Einfield (which i really love) and Bren :D
     
  15. Kitty

    Kitty Very Senior Member

    Nowt wrong with our tanks in WW2.
     
  16. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    No? You should ask what was right with them :point:

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    Read David Fletcher's books* on the development of the British tanks and despair!

    * mainly
    British Armour in WW2 (pt.1) - The Great Tank Scandal (fine title, eh?)
    British Armour in WW2 (pt.2)- The Universal Tank (better but not quite there yet)

    An interesting discussion here.
     
  17. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Mr Fletcher's books are always well worth a read. The first in the HMSO series Za mentions is also worth a shufti; 'Mechanised force', 'Mr Churchill's tank' is also rather good, amazing who could just stroll in and derail the entire process.

    We (the British) may have stumbled and gone through many fits and starts but did invent the things in the first place, attempt to play cricket from 1919-39 rather than all that distasteful 'rearmament' business and by god got it right in the end, if a little late! Centurion however has no place here, that's a thing of beauty and not strange at all....:p

    Mind you, Conway, Challenger, Caernarvon & Conqueror (those C's again)were all a little strange.

    By the way,
    I suspect some confusion has crept in here Dani.
    This one is the Russian Tsar tank:
    [​IMG]
    And this one is the British Tortoise:
    [​IMG]
    Cheers,
    Adam.
     
  18. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor

    Good stuff, the weirdest of the lot has to be the Tsar "tank" quite what the designers where thinking we will have no idea. Probably wouldn't of needed to fire it weapons everyone would just gape at them like idiots...

    Our tanks may suck now, but in Gulf War 1 we showed the high tech Yanks a thing or two. Oh, those were the days

    Actually alongside the Leopard and the Abrams the Challenger 2 is one of the best tanks in the world at the moment.
     
  19. adrian roberts

    adrian roberts Senior Member

    Good stuff, the weirdest of the lot has to be the Tsar "tank" quite what the designers where thinking we will have no idea. Probably wouldn't of needed to fire it weapons everyone would just gape at them like idiots...



    Don't forget the Russians tried this before the British or anyone else invented the tank. Give them credit for originality! But as for just gaping at them and not shooting back: this happened with the first British tanks on the Somme - for about five minutes.

    Actually alongside the Leopard and the Abrams the Challenger 2 is one of the best tanks in the world at the moment.


    We finally got it right with the Centurion.
     
  20. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Hot air manufacturer

    Yes, the Centurion surely was the first unreservedly good Brit tank but to get there what a load of crap along the road! :lol:
     

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