Stories of the men remembered in Khartoum War Cemetery

Discussion in 'North Africa & the Med' started by Carl, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. Carl

    Carl Now resident in Belgium...

    As many forum members know, I spend a lot of time at the Khartoum war Cemetery in my role as honorary supervisor of the cemetery. This is a role I am very proud of and commit a lot of my time to.

    The cemetery is maintained by 2 dedicated locals who keep the grounds in immaculate condition. My job really is just to oversee their great work and account for new headstones arriving at the cemetery. I also act as a point of contact in the British Embassy for queries regarding the cemetery and the people buried at the cemetery and across Sudan.

    I am sure there is a story behind all of the names remembered on the memorial wall and every one of the headstones. Obviously it would be very difficult to research all 1000+ people remembered there. I have, however, researched many of these men either through curiosity, at the request of family members or interested commonwealth servicemen and women serving with the UN here.

    I have therefore decided to create this thread to record each of the stories as I investigate them. My information will usually be from the internet, books or family members. Please feel free to add to my work and correct me if need be. If anyone knows the story behind the service or death of someone remembered in Khartoum, please include it in this thread. I am always thrilled to know a little more about the men commemorated here. I spend a lot of time passing on my research to visitors of the cemetery which seems to make their visit so much more interesting.

    We will remember them......:poppy:
     
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  2. Carl

    Carl Now resident in Belgium...

    WIENHOLT, ARNOLD (1877-1940), army officer, adventurer, pastoralist, politician and author, was born on 25 November 1877 at Goomburra station, near Allora, Queensland, eldest son of Edward Wienholt, pastoralist, and his Victorian-born wife Ellen, née Williams. Educated in England at Eton, Arnold returned to Australia and gained experience in the pastoral industry. Enlisting in the 4th (Queensland Imperial Bushmen) Contingent, on 18 May 1900 he embarked for South Africa; he was promoted sergeant in June and established a reputation for firmness and fairness. The contingent saw twelve months active service before being disbanded in Brisbane on 10 August 1901.

    In 1908 Wienholt became manager of Wienholt Estates Co. of Australasia Ltd and was responsible for the firm's Queensland properties. He was a good cattleman and published a method of dealing with the ravages of tick. Entering politics in 1909, he was the member for Fassifern in the Legislative Assembly until 1913. That year, having failed to win the Federal seat of Wide Bay, he decided to go on safari to German South-West Africa (Namibia). While hunting, he was mauled by a wounded lion; his wrist was mangled and he lost full use of his right hand.

    Learning of the outbreak of World War I, Wienholt made his way to Rhodesia. His offer to scout for the British was refused and he returned to Brisbane. In March 1915 he sailed for Africa accompanied by Ivan Lewis, a friend. They served briefly on border patrol as special service troopers in the British South African Police, then enlisted in the East Africa Mounted Rifles. Early in 1916 they were seconded to the Intelligence Branch and Wienholt was promoted warrant officer. Leading a patrol into German East Africa (Tanzania), he collected valuable information before being wounded and captured on 1 July. He escaped six months later and spent fifteen days crossing unfamiliar country to regain his own lines. For his gallantry he was awarded the Military Cross. Wienholt performed further successful reconnaissance missions, among them an arduous six-month expedition during which his party was frequently attacked by superior enemy forces. His courage and endurance won him the Distinguished Service Order in October 1918. A bar to his M.C. had been gazetted in September; he had also been promoted captain.

    Two months after arriving home, on 29 April 1919 Wienholt married Enid Frances Sydney Jones at St Philip's Anglican Church, Sydney. They made their home at his property, Washpool Farm, near Kalbar, Queensland. That year he was elected to the House of Representatives as National Party member for Moreton and immediately urged the government to repeal restrictions on German settlers disfranchised during the war. A prudent businessman, he spoke against public indebtedness and state enterprise. He voted in accordance with his conscience on all matters except 'motions of censure or want of confidence'. He did not contest the 1922 election. In 1930 the Fassifern electorate returned him to the assembly. Retaining the seat in 1932, he did not contest the 1935 election. He had published The Story of a Lion Hunt (London, 1922), an account of his adventures on safari and in World War I, and gone lion-hunting on four occasions between 1923 and 1929.

    Following the Italian invasion of Ethiopia, Wienholt arrived in Addis Ababa in December 1935 as war correspondent for the Brisbane Courier Mail. Two months later he joined the Ethiopian Red Cross as a transport officer and left for the front. Impeded by Italian air attacks and hostile tribesmen, he skilfully assisted various philanthropic groups to retreat to the capital. He recorded his experiences in The Africans' Last Stronghold: in Naboth's Vineyard (London, 1938) and continued to promote the Ethiopian cause in Australia and England, but failed to gain official or public support for his stand. On the outbreak of World War II he sailed to Aden; while awaiting Italy's entry into the war, he learned Arabic and Amharic. In anticipation of a commission in the British Army, he was ordered on 31 August 1940 to proceed overland from the Sudan to Ethiopia in charge of a small party of natives. Wienholt's group was a component of Military Mission 101, a force tasked with fostering rebellion against Italy. Ambushed and wounded, probably on the morning of 10 September, he was last seen scrambling into the bush and was presumed to have died.

    Of military bearing, with a moustache and short beard, Wienholt had been alert and restless. At Eton 'he was conspicuous as a straight running, fearless boy of great energy'. The boy was father to the man: he never smoked or drank alcohol, and his physical fitness more than once saved his life. Although taciturn, he liked to tell a good yarn, and to listen to one. As a soldier and scout, he was brave and resourceful, in the style of the heroes in his book, The Work of a Scout (London, 1923). A man of 'ruthless integrity and exacting truthfulness', he abhorred sentimentality and exaggeration. Consequently, his books understated his deeds. An 'uncompromising individualist', he had affection for the peoples of Africa. Wienholt lived much of his life alone, and died alone for a cause which he embraced eagerly and with passion. His wife survived him, as did their only daughter Anne who became a prominent artist. His Queensland estate was sworn for probate at £174,978.
    Select Bibliography

    P. E. von Lettow-Vorbeck, My Reminiscences of East Africa (Lond, 1920); M. J. Fox (compiler), The History of Queensland (Brisb, 1921); A. D. Mickle, Many a Mickle (Melb, 1953); C. G. Grabs, Australian, and a Hero (Toowoomba, Qld, 1987); W. Thesiger, The Life of my Choice (Lond, 1987); Canberra Times, 11 May 1968; R. C. Foot, Arnold Wienholt: A Biography of an Independent Australian (manuscript, privately held); Wienholt collection (University of Queensland Library). More on the resources
    Author: P. J. Greville
    Print Publication Details: P. J. Greville, 'Wienholt, Arnold (1877 - 1940)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 12, Melbourne University Press, 1990, pp 483-484.
     

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  3. Carl

    Carl Now resident in Belgium...

    Sergeant Graham Leslie Parish of the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve was posthumously awarded the George Cross for "gallantry of the highest order". He was the navigator on a plane which crashed after attempting to return to base after an abortive take off in Sudan on the 16th of September 1942. Most of the crew managed to get clear as the bomber burst into flames but one man had suffered two broken legs and was trapped. The bomber was engulfed and neither Parish or the passenger survived but when their charred bodies were recovered it was clear that Parish had carried him eight yards from the blocked emergency door to the rear turret in the hope of rescuing him, rather than save himself by climbing out through the astrohatch. He had been born on the 29th of August 1912. Notice of his award appeared in the London Gazette of the 2nd of April 1943.
     

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  4. Carl

    Carl Now resident in Belgium...

    Born in Sunderland in 1895, he was a surveyor in Canada before he returned home in 1914 and enlisted in 7th (Territorial Force) Battalion DLI. Commissioned as a Second Lieutenant with the 12th (Service) Battalion DLI, he was awarded the Military Cross in June 1916. He transferred to the Royal Air Force in April 1918 and received a permanent commission in 1919. He was killed on 1 April 1920, aged 25, when his aircraft crashed at Abu Hamed in the Sudan and he was buried at Khatoum War Cemetery. In June 1920, John Jaques was posthumously awarded the Air Force Cross.

    DLI

    If anyone has further information on how he won his MC I would be very interested. This is Pre-WW2 I know but he is the only DLI member commemorated in the Cemetery and I have a personal interest in the DLI as I am from Co Durham.
     

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  5. Capt.Sensible

    Capt.Sensible Well-Known Member

    What an extraordinary chap this Weinholt was. Do you know if his remains were ever found?

    CS
     
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  6. Verrieres

    Verrieres no longer a member

    Born in Sunderland in 1895, he was a surveyor in Canada before he returned home in 1914 and enlisted in 7th (Territorial Force) Battalion DLI. Commissioned as a Second Lieutenant with the 12th (Service) Battalion DLI, he was awarded the Military Cross in June 1916. He transferred to the Royal Air Force in April 1918 and received a permanent commission in 1919. He was killed on 1 April 1920, aged 25, when his aircraft crashed at Abu Hamed in the Sudan and he was buried at Khatoum War Cemetery. In June 1920, John Jaques was posthumously awarded the Air Force Cross.

    DLI

    If anyone has further information on how he won his MC I would be very interested. This is Pre-WW2 I know but he is the only DLI member commemorated in the Cemetery and I have a personal interest in the DLI as I am from Co Durham.

    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=56713&d=1310811775


    Flying Officer JOHN BARCLAY JAQUES, M.C., R.A.F., born 3rd May 1894 was the son of Mr.T. W. Jaques and Mrs Jessie Jacques ,24 Gowan Terrace, Jesmond, Newcastle upon Tyne. Born Sunderland Address given for J B Jacques MC as Hollinside Hall, Lanchester, Co. Durham formerly
    lieutenant in the 12th Durham L.I., who was killed in
    an aeroplane crash between Khartum and Cairo on April 1 ,
    1919,flying a Handley Page Family headstone records his death (.St.Andrew's Churchyard Bywell)
    Air Force Cross
    Flying Officer John Barclay Jaques, M.C.
    (D.L.I.) (late 216 Sqn., Palestine).
    SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 12 JULY, 1920
    Military Cross
    Temp. Lt. John Barclay Jaques, Durh. L.I.,
    Serv. Bn.
    SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 3 JUNE, 1916
    2/Lieutenant
    THE LONDON GAZETTE, 22 SEPTEMBER, 1914

    Additional info from the DLI Museum;-
    Born in Sunderland in 1895, he was a surveyor in Canada before he returned home in 1914 and enlisted in 7th (Territorial Force) Battalion DLI. Commissioned as a Second Lieutenant with the 12th (Service) Battalion DLI, he was awarded the Military Cross in June 1916. He transferred to the Royal Air Force in April 1918 and received a permanent commission in 1919. He was killed on 1 April 1920, aged 25, when his aircraft crashed at Abu Hamed in the Sudan and he was buried at Khatoum War Cemetery. In June 1920, John Jaques was posthumously awarded the Air Force Cross
     

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  7. DaveB

    DaveB Very Senior Member

    Brilliant work Carl - if it's OK I will add in what I know about the RAAF / Aussie burials there.



    Blenheim Z9612 / Place - South west of Wadi GA-Zouza, Middle East (Khartoum, Sudan) 25-Nov-41

    72OTU - the undercarriage struck a sand dune on approach to Wadi Gazouza and crashed, the aircraft was destroyed by fire - all RAAF crew killed: DUNSTONE, Clive Colin (Sergeant) 407226 / SKINNER, John (Sergeant) 407673 / THOMSON, James Murray (Sergeant) 400682
     
  8. DaveB

    DaveB Very Senior Member

    Hudson FK459 / Place - Khartoum, Sudan 16-Jun-43

    1 Aircraft Delivery Unit RAF - aircraft crashed near the RAF drome at Khartoum, Sudan, Middle East. The crew and all passengers were killed.


    Crew: RAF W O G E Harris (Captain - Pilot) 758106 / RAF Sgt B J Cox (Wireless Air Gunner) 1191447 ( both seconded to BAOC)


    The passengers included WO Neil Francis Gray (Navigator / Bomb Aimer) 406617 and WO Charles Matthew Raven (Pilot) 401538 of the RAAF.

    Other passengers:

    RODDY G M – (Squadron Leader); Service Number 37234 RAF
    HARRIS J S – (Sergeant); Service Number – 1550611 RAF
    GROCHOWSKI S – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – 780459 or 788459 – Polish
    TETNOWSKI E – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – 783155 – Polish
    STANKOWIAK L – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – 783821 Polish
    BOWN A G – (Sergeant); Service Number – 967926 or 967927
    SMITH R W – (Sergeant); Service Number – 1056937
    POYNTON S L – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – NZ41936 RNZAF
    TONCZAK G – (Warrant Officer); Service Number – 793299 Polish
    CREIGHATON J – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – 581321
    HARRINGTON A – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – 656010



    (information from research paper at the Australian War Memorial & the NAA file notes for Raven and Gray)
     
  9. DaveB

    DaveB Very Senior Member

    403338 HOLGATE, Raymond Edgar - (Pilot Officer) Harvard AJ808 / Place - Khartoum, Sudan 29-Oct-42

    71OTU - at 1100 hours, collided with Harvard AJ803 flown by Pilot Officer HAYES, Edwin Sautelle 405178 who survived by parachute (later killed in Kittyhawk FR316 - 12Jan1943). FO Holgate the pilot of AJ808 baled out of his aircraft but was killed when his chute failed to open. Both aircraft crashed some three miles north of Summit
     
  10. DaveB

    DaveB Very Senior Member

    MADDEN, Francis Joseph - (Flying Officer) 401982

    Harvard EX101 / Place - Khartoum, Sudan 29-Dec-42

    71 OTU - aircraft crashed at 2023 hours four miles south of Summit, and the pilot was killed. EX101 collided in mid air with Harvard AR143. No other crew names known at this point
     
  11. DaveB

    DaveB Very Senior Member

    410573 TAYLOR, Eric Stanley - (Pilot Officer)

    Baltimore 5 FW770 / Place - Malakal, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 12-Aug-44

    2ADU / 216 Group RAF - on a non-operational ferry flight crashed near Malakal, approx 95 miles north of Wau in Anglo Egyptian Sudan, Abyssinia. The aircraft dived steeply into a soft marsh land, disintegrated on impact, burnt, and sank into soft ground.

    In a statement by Flt Lt Mcdonald he said : “I was flying one of six Hurricanes in a convoy led by a Baltimore from 216 Group. At approx 8,000 feet, After about half an hours flying out of Malakal, we were faced with a “front”, and the Leader gave the signal Echelon starboard, so that he could turn away from it. The leader started to turn to port, but it was left a little late for at that moment we entered the cloud. The Hurricanes in No 3,5 and 7 positions on the port side were unable to get into echelon starboard because the trailing aerial of the Baltimore cut. So we broke away from the convoy and went back to Malakal.“ Three of the Hurricanes also crashed and their pilots were killed.

    Crew: RAF WO R D Smart (Captain - Pilot) / RAAF 410573 PO E S Taylor (Navigator Bomb Aimer) / RAF Flt Sgt F Marlor (Wireless Air Gunner) / SAAF LAC W Dolby (Air Mechanic) / SAAF LAC J P Van Ryan (Air Mechanic).


    All the Baltimore crew are buried in the Khartoum War Cemetery, Sudan.
     
  12. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER Patron

    Great info Carl!

    Well done to you also Dave.


    Cheers

    Geoff
     
  13. Carl

    Carl Now resident in Belgium...

    Brilliant work Carl - if it's OK I will add in what I know about the RAAF / Aussie burials there.



    Blenheim Z9612 / Place - South west of Wadi GA-Zouza, Middle East (Khartoum, Sudan) 25-Nov-41

    72OTU - the undercarriage struck a sand dune on approach to Wadi Gazouza and crashed, the aircraft was destroyed by fire - all RAAF crew killed: DUNSTONE, Clive Colin (Sergeant) 407226 / SKINNER, John (Sergeant) 407673 / THOMSON, James Murray (Sergeant) 400682

    Dave, this is great stuff and exactly why I set up the thread. I will try to take photos of the headstones of each of the guys you mention in your text.

    Thanks a million. Carl
     
  14. Carl

    Carl Now resident in Belgium...

    Brilliant work Carl - if it's OK I will add in what I know about the RAAF / Aussie burials there.



    Blenheim Z9612 / Place - South west of Wadi GA-Zouza, Middle East (Khartoum, Sudan) 25-Nov-41

    72OTU - the undercarriage struck a sand dune on approach to Wadi Gazouza and crashed, the aircraft was destroyed by fire - all RAAF crew killed: DUNSTONE, Clive Colin (Sergeant) 407226 / SKINNER, John (Sergeant) 407673 / THOMSON, James Murray (Sergeant) 400682

    Photos attached...
     

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  15. TomTAS

    TomTAS Very Senior Member

    Hi Carl,

    Just wondering how the Para ended up in the Sudan ???? Might make for some interesting reading...

    Cheers
    Tom
     
  16. Carl

    Carl Now resident in Belgium...

    Hi Carl,

    Just wondering how the Para ended up in the Sudan ???? Might make for some interesting reading...

    Cheers
    Tom

    You may be right Tom. In your experience, where is the best place to search?

    Regards, C
     
  17. Carl

    Carl Now resident in Belgium...

    Hudson FK459 / Place - Khartoum, Sudan 16-Jun-43

    1 Aircraft Delivery Unit RAF - aircraft crashed near the RAF drome at Khartoum, Sudan, Middle East. The crew and all passengers were killed.


    Crew: RAF Pilot Officer G E Harris (Captain - Pilot) 758106 / RAF Sgt B J Cox (Wireless Air Gunner) 1191347 ( both seconded to BAOC)


    The passengers included WO Neil Francis Gray (Navigator / Bomb Aimer) 406617 and WO Charles Matthew Raven (Pilot) 401538 of the RAAF.

    Other passengers:

    RODDY G M – (Squadron Leader); Service Number 37234 RAF
    HARRIS J S – (Sergeant); Service Number – 1550611 RAF
    GROCHOWSKI S W – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – 780459 or 788459 – Polish
    TETNOWSKI E – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – 783155 – Polish
    STANKOWIAK L – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – 783821 Polish
    BOWN D E G – (Sergeant); Service Number – 967926 or 967927
    SMITH R W – (Sergeant); Service Number – 1056937
    POINTON S L – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – NZ41936 RNZAF
    TOMCZAK C M – (Warrant Officer); Service Number – 793299 Polish
    CREIGHTON J – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – 581321
    PARTINGTON A – (Flight Sergeant); Service Number – 656010



    (information from research paper at the Australian War Memorial & the NAA file notes for Raven and Gray)

    Photos attached. I mangaged to find them all.

    I have amended your list above based on the CWGC database and the details from their headstones.

    I also found the grave of 'Fitter F.C. Tanner BAOC' who died on the same date. I'm assuming he died in the same incident, again, more investigation required to be 100% certain.
     

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    Smudger Jnr likes this.
  18. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    Carl
    Do you know if any of the men commemorated at the cemetery or on the memorial were awarded medals for gallantry in WW2?
     
  19. Carl

    Carl Now resident in Belgium...

    MADDEN, Francis Joseph - (Flying Officer) 401982

    Harvard EX101 / Place - Khartoum, Sudan 29-Dec-42

    71 OTU - aircraft crashed at 2023 hours four miles south of Summit, and the pilot was killed. EX101 collided in mid air with Harvard AR143. No other crew names known at this point

    Photo of Flying officer Madden's headstone attached.

    There is also a chap called 'Flight Lieutenant William McKenzie READ' buried alongside him, he died on the same day and I suspect in the same incident. However, I need to investigate this further, any ideas people????
     

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  20. Carl

    Carl Now resident in Belgium...

    410573 TAYLOR, Eric Stanley - (Pilot Officer)

    Baltimore 5 FW770 / Place - Malakal, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 12-Aug-44

    2ADU / 216 Group RAF - on a non-operational ferry flight crashed near Malakal, approx 95 miles north of Wau in Anglo Egyptian Sudan, Abyssinia. The aircraft dived steeply into a soft marsh land, disintegrated on impact, burnt, and sank into soft ground.

    In a statement by Flt Lt Mcdonald he said : “I was flying one of six Hurricanes in a convoy led by a Baltimore from 216 Group. At approx 8,000 feet, After about half an hours flying out of Malakal, we were faced with a “front”, and the Leader gave the signal Echelon starboard, so that he could turn away from it. The leader started to turn to port, but it was left a little late for at that moment we entered the cloud. The Hurricanes in No 3,5 and 7 positions on the port side were unable to get into echelon starboard because the trailing aerial of the Baltimore cut. So we broke away from the convoy and went back to Malakal.“ Three of the Hurricanes also crashed and their pilots were killed.

    Crew: RAF WO R D Smart AFM (Captain - Pilot) / RAAF 410573 PO E S Taylor (Navigator Bomb Aimer) / RAF Flt Sgt F Marlor (Wireless Air Gunner) / SAAF LAC W Dolby (Air Mechanic) / SAAF LAC G J P Van Rhyn (Air Mechanic).


    All the Baltimore crew are buried in the Khartoum War Cemetery, Sudan.


    Photos of all the above mentioned personnel's headstones are attached.
     

    Attached Files:

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