So it Began.....Their Finest Hour

Discussion in 'The War In The Air' started by Gage, Jul 10, 2011.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Sunday 11 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    SUNDAY 11 AUGUST 1940
    Heavy attack on Portland, feints by fighter formations over Dover. Convoy attacks in Thames Estuary and off East Anglia.
    Night: Harassing attacks on Merseyside. Minelaying.

    Weather: Fair in morning, cloudy for most of the day.

    Main Activity:

    At 0830 hours, seventeen Bf 110 fighter-bombers from Erprobungsgruppe 210 crossed the Channel and bombed Dover Harbour. Little damage was done but three barrage balloons were shot down by the Bf 109 escort. Spitfires of No. 74 Squadron were vectored to the scene and met Bf 109s from JG 51 head-on. One Spitfire was lost in the engagement. Meanwhile, Spitfires of No. 64 Squadron engaged Bf 109s of I/JG 2 over Bognor Regis and destroyed two German fighters for no loss.

    At about 1030 hours, a large formation comprising fifty-four Ju 88s from I & III/KG 54 and twenty Heinkel He 111s of KG 27, escorted by sixty-one Bf 110s from I & II/ZG 2 and about thirty Bf 109s of III/JG 2, approached the Royal Navy base at Portland and Weymouth. Hurricanes from Nos. 1, 145, 87, 213, and 238 Squadrons along with Spitfires from Nos. 152 and 609 Squadrons were scrambled to intercept. In the ensuing combat, eighteen German aircraft were destroyed for the loss of seventeen British fighters. Two oil storage tanks at Portland were bombed and set on fire. Several ships were also damaged.

    At 1148 hours, Bf 110 fighter-bombers from Erprobungsgruppe 210 and Do 17s from 9./KG 2, escorted by Bf 110s of ZG 26, attacked the convoy codenamed BOOTY off Harwich, hitting two freighters. Hurricanes of Nos. 17 and 85 Squadrons together with Spitfires of No. 74 Squadron intercepted the raid, shooting down four German aircraft and damaging several others. Three British fighters were also lost and another damaged. As the enemy aircraft withdrew, another raid comprising Do 17s from II & III/KG 2 and Ju 87s from II/StG 1 & IV/LG 1, escorted by Bf 109s of JG 26, attacked a convoy in the Thames Estuary, damaging several ships. Hurricanes of No. 111 Squadron and Spitfires of No. 74 Squadron were scrambled to intercept. A Ju 87 and Bf 109 were shot down for the loss of five Hurricanes.

    German Losses
    Airmen: 48 | Aircraft: 38

    British Losses
    Airmen: 25 | Aircraft: 28

    Hurricane P2951, No. 145 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    F/O G.R. Branch. Missing in action. Believed shot down by Bf 109s off coast.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Branch.htm

    Hurricane V7294, No. 145 Squadron. Aircraft crashed on Isle of Wight.
    F/O A. Osterwicz. Killed. Shot down by Bf 109s off Swanage coast. Not seen to bale out.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Ostowicz.htm

    Hurricane P2978, No. 238 Squadron. Aircraft lost at sea.
    Sgt G. Gledhill. Killed. Shot down over Channel during combat with unknown enemy aircraft.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Gledhill.htm

    Hurricane V7231, No. 87 Squadron Exeter. Crashed into sea.
    F/L R.V. Jeff. Missing in action. Last seen in combat over Channel, failed to return to base.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Jeff.htm

    Hurricane R4097, No. 238 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    F/L S.C. Walch. Missing in action. Shot down in combat over Channel two miles E of Weymouth
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Walch.htm

    Hurricane P3885, No. 601 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    P/O J.L. Smithers. Killed. Shot down by unknown enemy aircraft. Buried at St Marie Le Havre, France.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Smithers.htm

    Hurricane P3819, No. 238 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    F/O M.L. Steborowski. Killed. Shot down by unknown enemy aircraft over Channel.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Steborowski.htm

    Hurricane P3222, No. 238 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    P/O F.N. Cawse. Killed. Shot down in combat by Bf 109 off coast.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Cawse.htm

    Hurricane R4092, No. 601 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    F/O R.S. Demetriadi. Killed. Shot down by enemy aircraft over Channel. Buried at Cayeuz ser Mer, France.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Demetriadi.htm

    Hurricane P3783, No. 601 Squadron. Failed to return to base.
    F/O J. Gillan. Missing in action. Believed shot down over Channel during combat.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Gillan.htm

    Hurricane L2057, No. 601 Squadron. Failed to return to base.
    P/O W.G. Dickie. Missing in action. Last seen in combat over the Channel.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Dickie.htm

    Spitfire R6614, No. 152 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    P/O J.S.B. Jones. Killed. Shot down by Bf 109 in mid Channel. Buried at Le Havre France.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/JonesJSB.htm

    Hurricane P2650, No. 213 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    F/L R.D.G. Wight. Killed. Shot down in combat with enemy aircraft. Believed buried at Cayeux sur Mer.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Wight.htm

    Hurricane P3789, No. 213 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    Sgt S.I. Butterfield. Killed. Shot down by unknown enemy aircraft over Channel.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Butterfield.htm

    Hurricane P3172, No. 1 Squadron. Aircraft destroyed.
    P/O J.A.J. Davey. Killed. Hit by gunfire after combat with Bf 110. Attempted forced landing, aircraft burnt out.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/DaveyJAJ.htm

    Spitfire R6630, No. 610 Squadron. Failed to return to base.
    Sgt W.J. Neville. Missing in action. Shot down while on patrol over French coast.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Neville.htm

    Spitfire R6918, No. 610 Squadron. Failed to return to base.
    F/Sgt J.H. Tanner. Killed. Shot down off French coast. Buried at Calais, France.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Tanner.htm

    Hurricane P3760, No. 17 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    P/O K. Manger. Missing in action. Crashed in sea after combat with Bf 110 off Suffolk coast.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Manger.htm

    Spitfire R6962, No. 74 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    P/O D.N.E. Smith. Killed. Crashed into sea 30 miles off Harwich after combat with Bf 110.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/SmithDNE.htm

    Spitfire R6757, No. 74 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    P/O D.G. Cobden. Killed. Engaged combat with Bf 110 off Harwich, believed shot down.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Cobden.htm

    Hurricane N2667, No. 56 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    Sgt R.D. Baker. Killed. Mistakenly shot down by unknown Spitfire while on convoy patrol.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/BakerRD.htm

    Hurricane P3105, No. 111 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    P/O J.H.H. Copeman. Killed. Shot down in combat with enemy aircraft over Thames Estuary.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Copeman.htm

    Hurricane P3942, No. 111 Squadron. Presumed crashed into sea.
    Sgt R.B. Sim. Missing in action. Failed to return after combat with Bf 109 escorts.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Sim.htm

    Hurricane P3922, No. 111 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    P/O J.W. McKenzie. Missing in action. Shot down by Bf 109 over Thames Estuary.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/McKenzieJW.htm

    Hurricane P3595, No. 111 Squadron. Crashed into sea.
    P/O R.R. Wilson. Missing in action. Last seen attacking Bf 109 escorts over Thames Estuary.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/WilsonRR.htm
     
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  2. Little Friend

    Little Friend Senior Member

    Not a good day for our side :mad: God Bless All Our Brave Young Heroes That Were Lost That Day :poppy: R.I.P.
     
  3. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Monday 12 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    MONDAY 12 AUGUST 1940
    Heavy raid on Portsmouth. Convoy in Thames Estuary, radar stations and coastal airfields attacked.
    Night: Widespread harassing raids.

    Weather: Fine with some mist patches.

    Main Activity:

    Shortly after 0900 hours, twenty Bf 109 and Bf 110 fighter-bombers of Erprobungsgruppe 210 attacked the Chain Home radar stations at Dover, Rye, and Pevensey, knocking them out of action for six hours. A fourth attack on the station at Dunkirk near Canterbury caused no vital damage. While emergency repairs were being carried out, Do 17s of I/KG 2, escorted by Bf 109s of JG 54, attacked RAF Lympne, damaging hangers, offices, and the landing ground.

    At about 1100 hours, twenty-two Ju 87 Stuka dive-bombers of IV/LG 1, escorted by Bf 109s of III/JG 26, were despatched to attack two convoys codenamed ARENA and AGENT in the Thames Estuary. The naval trawlers HMS Tamarisk and Pyrope were sunk. Fifteen Hurricanes from Nos. 151 and 501 Squadrons were scrambled to intercept, shooting down one Stuka and damaging several others before the escorting Messerschmitts intervened. Two Hurricanes were lost and another two damaged.

    At 1151 hours, a large formation was detected heading towards Brighton. The incoming raid comprised sixty-three Ju 88 bombers of KG 51, escorted by 120 Bf 110s of ZG 2 and ZG 76 along with twenty-five Bf 109s of JG 53. The bulk of the bomber formation attacked Portsmouth Harbour, destroying the railway station, oil tanks, and shipping, and killing ninety-six navy personnel and civilians. A smaller formation of fifteen Ju 88s split off and attacked the Chain Home radar station at Ventnor, knocking it out of action for three days. Almost sixty Hurricanes and Spitfires were scrambled from Middle Wallop, Tangmere, Warmwell, and Exeter but arrived too late to prevent the bombing. Eleven Ju 88s, five Bf 110s, and two Bf 109s were shot down for the loss of thirteen British fighters and four damaged.

    At 1245 hours, twenty Bf 109 and Bf 110 fighter-bombers of Erprobungsgruppe 210 made a low level attack on RAF Manston, immediately followed by a medium level attack by eighteen Do 17s of I/KG 2. An estimated 150 high explosive bombs hit the aerodrome, destroying two hangers, the workshops where a civilian clerk was killed, and damaging two Blenheims. A Spitfire of No. 65 Squadron was also damaged while taking off during the attack.

    At 1743 hours, RAF Hawkinge was attacked by Erprobungsgruppe 210. Hangars, workshops, and other buildings were destroyed, and two Spitfires were seriously damaged with others being struck by splinters. Two civilians and five airmen were also killed.

    Despite the damage, both Manston and Hawkinge were back on ‘top line’ within twenty-four hours.

    German Losses
    Airmen: 52 | Aircraft: 32

    British Losses
    Airmen: 11 | Aircraft: 18

    Hurricane P3304, No. 151 Squadron. Aircraft destroyed.
    P/O R.W.G. Beley. Died of wounds. Shot down by Bf 109. Crashed into sea and rescued. Taken to Manston.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Beley.htm

    Spitfire K9999, No. 152 Squadron. Aircraft lost.
    P/O D.C. Shepley. Missing in action. Last seen in combat with Ju 88. Failed to return to base.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Shepley.htm

    Spitfire P9456, No. 152 Squadron. Aircraft destroyed.
    F/L L.C. Withall. Missing in action. Shot down by gunfire from Ju 88, believed crashed into sea.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Withall.htm

    Hurricane R4180, No. 145 Squadron. Aircraft destroyed.
    P/O J.H. Harrison. Missing in action. Shot down over Channel during combat with Ju 88s and Bf 109s.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/HarrisonJH.htm

    Hurricane P3391, No. 145 Squadron. Aircraft lost.
    Sgt J Kwiecinski. Missing in action. Failed to return to base.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Kwiecinski.htm

    Hurricane R4176, No. 145 Squadron. Aircraft destroyed.
    F/L W. Pankratz. Missing in action. Shot down over Channel during combat with Ju 88s and Bf 109s.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Pankratz.htm

    Spitfire P9333, No. 266 Squadron. Aircraft destroyed.
    P/O D.G. Ashton. Killed. Aircraft burst into flames from gunfire from enemy aircraft.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/AshtonDG.htm

    Hurricane P2802, No. 213 Squadron. Aircraft destroyed.
    Sgt S.G. Stuckey. Missing in action. Shot down over Channel by Bf 109s.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Stuckey.htm

    Hurricane P2854, No. 213 Squadron. Aircraft lost.
    Sgt G.N. Wilkes. Missing in action. Last seen in combat with Bf 109s. Failed to return to base.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Wilkes.htm
     
  4. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

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  5. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Tuesday 13 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    TUESDAY 13 AUGUST 1940
    Opening of ‘Eagle Day’ misfires. Heavy raid on Eastchurch followed by afternoon raids on Portland, Southampton and airfields in Kent and Hampshire. 1,485 German sorties.
    Night: Light attacks on Midlands, Wales and the West Country.

    Weather: Mainly fair. Early morning mist and slight drizzle in places and some cloud in the Channel.

    Main Activity:

    Between 0450 and 0510 hours, seventy-four Do 17 bombers of KG 2 took off to attack Sheerness Dockyard and the Coastal Command airfield at Eastchurch. A last-minute cancellation order (due to low cloud) failed to reach KG 2, and the bombers continued on without the escorting Bf 110s from ZG 26. The cloudy weather enabled the Do 17s to attack both targets unimpeded. Over two hundred high explosive and incendiary bombs were dropped on Eastchurch, destroying hangers, the ammunition dump, and killing sixteen airmen. Six aircraft were also destroyed on the ground. Spitfires of No. 74 Squadron along with Hurricanes of Nos. 111 and 151 Squadrons intercepted the Dorniers, shooting down five and damaging six others.

    Between 0500 and 0535 hours, thirty-eight Ju 88 bombers of I and II/KG 54, escorted by Bf 110s of V/LG 1 and Bf 109s of JG 2, set off to bomb the Royal Aircraft Establishment airfield at Farnborough and the army cooperation airfield at Odiham. Hurricanes from Nos. 43, 87, and 601 Squadrons together with Spitfires of No. 64 Squadron were scrambled to intercept. In the resulting action, four Ju 88s and one Bf 109 were shot down for the loss of three Hurricanes.

    At 1110 hours, twenty-three Bf 110s of V/LG 1 took off on a Freie Jagd over Portland. Hurricanes from No. 601 Squadrons intercepted the German fighters, shooting down six aircraft and damaging three others. Only one Hurricane was shot down and another damaged.

    At 1400 hours, ‘Adlertag’ was finally given the official go-ahead.

    At 1530 hours, fifty-eight Ju 88s from I, II, and III/LG 1, escorted by Bf 109s from JG 53 and Bf 110s from ZG 2, took off to bomb the airfields at Boscombe Down, Worthy Down, and Andover, while fifty-two Ju 87 Stuka dive-bombers from StG 1 and StG 2, escorted by Bf 109s of JG 53 and Bf 110s of III/ZG 76, set off to attack Warmwell and Yeovil. Hurricanes from Nos. 213, 238, 257, and 601 Squadrons along with Spitfires from Nos. 152 and 609 Squadrons were scrambled and engaged the enemy aircraft over the English coast. Both StG 1 and StG 2 failed to find their targets due to cloud and attacked Portland instead. One Staffel of II/StG 2 was intercepted by Spitfires of No. 609 Squadron and lost six out of nine aircraft. I/LG 1 also abandoned its attempt to reach Boscombe Down and bombed Southampton, causing damage to the port and nearby residences. One aircraft from III/LG 1 dropped bombs near the important Sector Station of Middle Wallop by mistake while the rest hit the bomber airfield at Andover, damaging buildings and killing two. Six Ju 88s were shot down and many others damaged.

    At 1716 hours, Ju 87 Stuka dive-bombers from IV/LG 1, escorted by Bf 109s of JG 26, attacked the Coastal Command airfield at Detling, destroying the operations block and killing sixty-seven personnel including the Station Commander. Twenty-two aircraft on the ground were written off. Hurricanes from No. 56 Squadron were scrambled to intercept, shooting down one Bf 109 for the loss of four aircraft.

    German Losses
    Airmen: 66 | Aircraft: 39

    British Losses
    Airmen: 4 | Aircraft: 15

    Hurricane. P3387, No. 87 Squadron. Aircraft destroyed.
    F/O R.L. Glyde. Missing. Hit by gunfire from Ju 88 and crashed into the sea.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Glyde.htm

    Hurricane P3177, No. 238 Squadron. Aircraft lost.
    Sgt H.J. Marsh. Missing. Believed shot down by Bf 109. Failed to return to base.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/MarshHJ.htm

    Hurricane P3348, No. 213 Squadron. Aircraft destroyed.
    Sgt P.P. Norris. Killed. Shot down off Portland and crashed into sea. Body washed ashore in France later.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/NorrisPP.htm

    Spitfire R6766, No. 65 Squadron. Aircraft destroyed.
    P/O F.S. Gregory. Killed. Night flying practice. Baled out too low for reasons unknown.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/GregoryFS.htm
     
  6. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

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  7. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Wednesday 14 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    WEDNESDAY 14 AUGUST 1940
    Targets in south-east England, airfields and communications facilities along with airfields in the west.
    Night: Little activity.

    Weather: Mainly cloudy with bright patches and cloud in the Channel.

    Main Activity:

    At 1140 hours, a large formation comprising eighty Ju 87 Stuka dive-bombers of II/StG 1 and IV/LG 1, escorted by around 100 Bf 109s of JG 26, was detected forming over Calais. Hurricanes of Nos. 32 and 615 Squadrons along with Spitfires of Nos. 65 and 610 Squadrons were scrambled and met the enemy aircraft over Dover. In the ensuing combat, one Bf 109 was shot down for the loss of three British fighters with two others damaged. The Goodwin lightship was attacked and sunk by the Stukas and eight Dover barrage balloons were shot down by a staffel of Bf 109s.

    At 1215 hours, Bf 110 fighter-bombers of Erprobungsgruppe 210 attacked RAF Manston at low level, destroying four hangers and three Blenheims on the ground. Two Bf 110s were shot down by anti-aircraft defences.

    At 1745 hours, RAF Middle Wallop was attacked by a small formation of He 111 bombers from KG 55 and a lone Ju 88 from 1./LG 1. One hanger was destroyed and three airmen were killed. Spitfires of No. 609 Squadron intercepted the enemy raiders, shooting down the Ju 88 and one of the Heinkels.

    German Losses
    Airmen: 35 | Aircraft: 20

    British Losses
    Airmen: 4 | Aircraft: 9

    Hurricane P3109, No. 615 Squadron.
    F/O P. Collard. Killed. Shot down over Channel. Believed body washed ashore in France.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Collard.htm

    Hurricane P3160, No. 615 Squadron.
    P/O C.R. Montgomery. Killed. Failed to return to base. Believed shot down over Channel.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/MontgomeryCR.htm

    Spitfire N3024, No. 609 Squadron.
    F/O H. McD Goodwin. Killed. Shot down off coast by unknown enemy aircraft.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/GoodwinHMcD.htm

    Hurricane L1739, No. 43 Squadron.
    Sgt H.F. Montgomery. Killed. Last seen in combat with He 111. Failed to return to base.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/MontgomeryHF.htm
     
  8. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Thursday 15 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    THURSDAY 15 AUGUST 1940
    Decisive raids by German aircraft during their most intensive period of the battle to date. Seventy-five aircraft are lost during the day with airfields as their main targets.
    Night: Little activity.

    Weather: High pressure giving fine, warm weather although some cloud remained in the Channel area.

    Main Activity:

    In Britain the early hours seemed quiet enough apart from reconnaissance flights but from 1100 hours onwards five main attacks developed.

    First about 100 enemy aircraft, made up of forty Ju 87s with a heavy escort, attacked the forward airfields at Hawkinge and Lympne. At the latter a heavy dive-bombing attack cut all water and power supplies, caused a direct hit on the station sick quarters, and damaged several other buildings. Various sections had to be evacuated to nearby houses and the field was not serviceable for forty-eight hours. At Hawkinge the damage was far less with one hangar hit and a small barrack block destroyed. One of the most serious consequences in the area was the shut-down of Rye and Dover C.H. stations and Foreness C.H.L. which suffered a power failure when the electric mains were hit. Nos. 54 and 501 squadrons met the force, 54 attacking out of the sun on to the dive-bombers, but the devastation at Lympne could not be prevented.

    Then followed an attack which was to be the most interesting of the whole day. Banking on tactical surprise and conveniently forgetting the radar chain, Luftflotte 5 launched two simultaneous thrusts in the north and north-east. They expected little opposition and their reception came as a painful surprise. At 1208 hours, radar began to plot a formation of twenty + opposite the Firth of Forth at a range of over ninety miles. As the raid drew closer the estimates went up to thirty in three sections flying south-west towards Tynemouth. At Watnall the approach of No. 13 Group’s first daylight raid was watched on the operations table with particular interest. With an hour’s warning the controller was able to put squadrons in an excellent position to attack, with No. 72 Squadron Spitfires in the path of the enemy off the Farne Islands and No. 605 Squadron Hurricanes over Tyneside. Nos. 79 and 607 were also put up, but while the latter was right in the path of the raid, No. 79 was too far north. No. 72 Squadron from Acklington was the first to make contact and it came as a distinct shock when the thirty materialised as I and III/KG 26 with sixty-five Heinkel 111s, and the entire I/ZG 76 from Stavanger with thirty-four Bf 110s. After a brief pause in which to survey the two massive groups flying in vic formation, S/L E. Graham led No. 72 straight in from the flank, one section attacking the fighters and the rest the bombers. The Bf 110s formed defensive circles, while the Heinkels split up. Some of them jettisoned their bombs in the sea and headed back for Norway, leaving several of their number in the sea. The separate parts of the formation finally reached the coast, one south of Sunderland and the other south of Acklington. No. 79 intercepted the northern group over the water while a flight from No. 605 squadron caught it over land. Most of the bombs fell harmlessly in the sea. The group off Sunderland found Nos. 607 and 41 squadrons waiting for it and they too bombed to little effect apart from wrecking houses. The raiders turned back to Norway, the Bf 110s having already departed some minutes before. Of a total force of about 100, eight bombers and seven fighters were destroyed and several more damaged without British loss. The airfield targets such as Usworth, Linton-on-Ouse and Dishforth went unscathed. One Staffel of III/KG 26 lost five of its nine aircraft in the course of the fighting.

    Farther south, an unescorted formation of fifty Ju 88s from I, II and III/KG 30, based on Aalborg, was heading in to No. 12 Group off Flamborough Head. Full radar warning was given and No. 73 Squadron Hurricanes, No. 264 Squadron Defiants and No. 616 Squadron Spitfires were sent to patrol the area, the force being supplemented later by Blenheims from No. 219 Squadron in 13 Group. Both No. 616 and a flight of No. 73 engaged, but the enemy split into eight sections. Some turned north to bomb Bridlington where houses were hit and an ammunition dump blown up. The main force, however, flew to the 4 Group Bomber Station at Driffield, Yorkshire, where four hangars were damaged and ten Whitleys were destroyed on the ground. Heavy anti-aircraft fire was directed against the bombers and one was brought down. Altogether, six of KG 30’s Ju 88s were shot down, representing about 10% of the force sent over.

    In all, the northern attacks cost sixteen bombers out of a serviceable Luftflotte 5 force of 123, and seven fighters of the thirty-four available.

    In the south at noon it was the turn of Manston once again. Twelve Bf 109s attacked with cannon and machine-gun fire, destroying two Spitfires and causing sixteen casualties.

    This was followed at 1500 hours by a force of Ju 87s, Bf 110 fighter bombers and Bf 109s attacking the fighter station at Martlesham Heath without being intercepted. The Ju 87s concentrated on an incomplete signals station to the west, while the Bf 110s hit the airfield. The signals station escaped with broken windows and a punctured water tank, but Martlesham itself had workshops and officers’ mess wrecked, a burst water main and cut telephone wires. A visiting Fairey Battle blew up, smashing two hangars, the watch office and the night-fighting equipment sheds. The station was engaged on repair work throughout the following day.

    Simultaneously about 100 aircraft were approaching Deal to be followed by 150 over Folkestone at 1530 hours. Only four fighter squadrons were on patrol to deal with this influx, although followed by three more (Nos. 1, 17, 32, 64, 111, 151 and 501) and they were warded off by the escorts through sheer weight of numbers. The German formations broke up to deal with separate targets, one being the Short Brothers and Pobjoy factories at Rochester. The production of four engine Stirling heavy bombers at Rochester suffered a severe set-back due to six complete aircraft and the finished parts store being destroyed. This was a real victory for the Luftwaffe but it had no effect on Fighter Command. Several German machines attacked Eastchurch and the radar stations at Dover, Rye, Bawdsey and Foreness, although without useful results.

    Two further attacks were made in the early evening, the first—a feint—in the south-west and the second against Kent and Surrey. Some 250 aircraft from Luftflotte 3 moved towards the Isle of Wight in two groups at 1700 hours and spread out over Hampshire and Wiltshire. Ju 88s with Bf 110 escort attacked Middle Wallop but did less damage than the three aircraft of the previous day. No. 609 Squadron got off just before the dive-bombing started, and harried the stragglers out to sea. This raid had been intercepted at intervals by no less than eight RAF squadrons and one section of it which reached Worthy Down caused little damage, while another dropped bombs on Portland. In their combat reports the crews who raided Odiham claimed to have hit Andover instead.

    Out of the whole German force twenty-five aircraft were lost against sixteen by Fighter Command. Thirteen Bf 110s were brought down of which three fell to the guns of Belgian Lieutenant J. Phillipart of 213 Squadron. Altogether eleven RAF squadrons were put up against these raids, being Nos. 32, 43, 111, 601, 604, 609, 87, 152, 213, 234 and 266.

    At 1815 hours over seventy aircraft were plotted coming in from Calais, and as most of his forward squadrons were refuelling and rearming, Park switched four squadrons from the eastern sectors following up with four and a half more as they became available. Intercepted over the coast by two squadrons, including No. 501, which was almost at the end of its fuel, the Germans split up and missed their primary targets of Biggin Hill and Kenley. Instead they spotted West Malling, Kent, from high altitude and damaged runways and buildings. Other bombers wandering over Surrey decided to deliver their loads on Croydon, the home of No. 111 Squadron, which was officially not yet operational. Bf 110s from Erprobungsgruppe 210 with Bf 109 escort came in at 2,000 feet just after 1850 hours to drop their bombs, which destroyed the Rollason and Redwing factories, together with many trainer aircraft, and a radio component works. Over eighty casualties were caused and it was the first recorded raid on Greater London. Over the airfield on patrol at 10,000 feet were No. 111 Squadron Hurricanes which promptly dived on the raiders and together with No. 32 Squadron from Biggin Hill shot down four as they went flat out for the coast. This made ErprGr.210’s losses eight Bf 110s in five days.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster.

    German Losses
    Airmen: 128 | Aircraft: 76

    British Losses
    Airmen: 15 | Aircraft: 35

    Hurricane P2801, No. 615 Squadron.
    Sgt D.W. Halton. Listed as missing. Aircraft crashed and burnt out. No sign of pilot.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Halton.htm

    Hurricane R4075, No. 1 Squadron.
    P/O D.O.M. Browne. Listed as missing. Last seen in combat with enemy fighters over North Sea.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/BrowneDOM.htm

    Hurricane P4043, No. 1 Squadron.
    Sgt M.M. Shanahan. Listed as missing. Last seen in combat with enemy fighters over North Sea.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Shanahan.htm

    Spitfire R6990, No. 64 Squadron.
    F/O C.J.D. Andreae. Listed as missing. Last seen in combat with Bf 109s over Channel.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Andreae.htm

    Spitfire K9964, No. 64 Squadron.
    P/O R. Roberts. Taken prisoner. Forced landing after combat with Bf 109s over Channel.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/RobertsR.htm

    Spitfire N3189, No. 266 Squadron.
    Sgt F.B. Hawley. Listed as missing. Believed crashed into Channel after destroying He 115.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Hawley.htm

    Hurricane V7227, No. 213 Squadron.
    P/O S.M.H.C. Buchin. Listed as missing. Failed to return to base after combat over Channel.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Buchin.htm

    Hurricane P3944, No. 111 Squadron.
    F/O B.M. Fisher. Killed. Shot down by Ju 88 and exploded. Pilot bailed out of burning plane.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/FisherBM.htm

    Hurricane P3215, No. 87 Squadron.
    S/L T.G. Lovell-Gregg. Killed. Aircraft damaged by enemy gunfire. Crashed attempting to reach Warmwell.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Lovell-Gregg.htm

    Hurricane P2872, No. 87 Squadron.
    P/O P.W. Comeley. Listed as missing. Shot down by Bf 110 off coast and crashed into the sea.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Comely.htm

    Spitfire N3277, No. 234 Squadron
    P/O R. Hardy. Taken prisoner. Forced landed on beach after combat over Channel off Swanage.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/HardyR.htm

    Spitfire R6988, No. 234 Squadron.
    P/O C.H. Hight. Killed. Collapsed and died by his aircraft after being shot down and crashing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Hight.htm

    Spitfire N3168, No. 266 Squadron.
    P/O F.W. Cale. Killed. Baled out over River Medway but was dead when found in the river.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Cale.htm

    Hurricane P3941, No. 151 Squadron.
    P/O J.T. Johnstone. Killed. Shot down into Channel by Bf 109. Was dead when picked up by rescue boat.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Johnston.htm

    Hurricane V7410, No. 151 Squadron.
    P/O M. Rozwadowski. Listed as missing. Failed to return to base after combat over Channel.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Rozwadowski.htm
     
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  9. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    https://battleofbritain1940.com/entry/friday-16-august-1940/
    FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 1940
    Airfields in Kent, Hampshire and West Sussex attacked with widespread damage. Radar station at Ventnor put out of action. Other targets in Oxfordshire, Essex and Suffolk hit.
    Night: Numerous light attacks.

    Weather: Mainly fair and warm with haze over the Channel.

    Main Activity:

    The plotting tables were quiet until 11 a.m. when a series of raids were leveled against Norfolk, Kent and the Greater London area with airfields as the main targets, including Manston. West Mailing, an 11 Group station, was again hit while clearance was still going on after the previous day’s attack. Some eighteen bombers dropped high explosives and incendiaries, destroying one aircraft on the ground and putting the station out of action until the 20th. Twelve fighter squadrons were up.

    Things were quiet again until midday when the radar screens showed three heavy raids coming in. The first of fifty headed for the Thames Estuary, the second of 150 appeared off Dover, while the third of 100 massed over Cherbourg and proceeded to the Portsmouth-Southampton area. In all, radar was plotting about 350 aircraft simultaneously between Yarmouth and Portland. There was some cloud about, and, despite the despatch of twelve squadrons by Nos. 10, 11 and 12 Groups, many of the bombers succeeded in getting through and causing considerable damage. London suburbs were bombed, including Wimbledon and Esher, where shops and houses were hit. Bombs on Maiden, Surrey, railway station killed staff and passengers and put both lines out of operation. To the north, Gravesend and Tilbury were attacked, and bombs fell on Harwell and Farnborough aerodromes.

    The raid off Portland split up and sections arrived over Ventnor, Tangmere, Lee-on-Solent and Gosport. Twelve Ju 88s with Bf 110 escort dived out of the sun on Gosport, damaging buildings, killing four people and seriously injuring two. At Ventnor five Ju 87s in a six-minute raid added to the destruction of the 12th. The only habitable buildings left were the diesel house, the receiving block and the protected rooms. Ventnor was thus out of action from August 12th to 23rd, and service was only resumed when a mobile station was rigged nearby at Bembridge. A number of Fleet Air Arm aircraft and hangars were destroyed by fire at Lee-on-Solent.

    Tangmere, with its satellite Westhampnett, was an important sector station. The Ju 87s approached from the east and had a clear run up over the airfield dropping a pattern of bombs which destroyed all the hangars, workshops, stores, sick quarters, pumping station and the officers’ mess. The Tannoy broadcasting system, all light, power, water and sanitation were temporarily out of action. Losses in aircraft were heavy, with three Blenheims destroyed and three Blenheims, seven Hurricanes and one Magister damaged. Ten service personnel and three civilians were killed, while twenty others were injured.

    The Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough, Hants, was attacked by eight Ju 88s doing extensive damage to the motor transport yard. The last delayed-action bomb from this raid did not explode until 49 hours afterwards.

    In the evening, two Ju 88s carried out the most destructive raid of the day, on Brize Norton, Oxfordshire, a training station and Maintenance Unit in No. 23 Group. Thirty-two bombs burned out forty-six trainer aircraft in the hangars of No. 2 Service Flying Training School, wrecked other buildings and caused ten casualties.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 55 | Aircraft: 44

    British Losses
    Airmen: 11 | Aircraft: 24

    Spitfire R6768, No. 266 Squadron
    S/L R.L. Wilkinson killed. Believed collided with Bf 109 over Channel. Some authorities say shot down.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/WilkinsonRL.htm

    Spitfire N3240, No. 266 Squadron
    Sub Lt H.L. Greenshields killed. Chased Bf 109 across Channel, crashed and burnt in Calais suburb.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Greenshields.htm

    Spitfire N3095, No. 266 Squadron
    P/O N.G. Bowen killed. Shot down and aircraft burst into flames during combat with Bf 109.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/BowenNG.htm

    Hurricane R4193, No. 111 Squadron
    F/L H.M. Ferriss killed. Collided with Do 17 during a head-on attack on enemy formation.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Ferriss.htm

    Hurricane P3358, No. 601 Squadron
    P/O W.M.L. Fiske. Died of Injuries next day. Damaged by gunfire from Ju 87 and crashed on landing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Fiske.htm

    Hurricane ?, No. 213 Squadron
    P/O J.E.P. Laricheliere. Listed as missing. Failed to return after combat over Portland.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Laricheliere.htm

    Hurricane P3616, No. 249 Squadron
    P/O M.A. King killed. Shot down by Bf 110. Pilot bailed out but parachute collapsed on descent.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/KingMA.htm

    Spitfire R6802, No. 610 Squadron
    F/Lt W.H.C. Warner. Listed as missing. Last seen in combat with Bf 109 over Channel. Failed to return.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Warner.htm

    Spitfire K9915, No. 65 Squadron
    P/O L. L. Pyman killed. Crashed into Channel during combat.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Pyman.htm
     
  10. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Saturday 17 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    SATURDAY 17 AUGUST 1940
    Activity limited to reconnaissance sorties. Fighter Command faces pilot shortage.
    Night: Light raids on the Midlands, Merseyside and South Wale

    Weather: Fine in the Channel, haze and some cloud in the east.

    Main Activity:

    The lull continued throughout the day. Reconnaissance flights were plotted and, although Fighter Command flew 288 sorties, Luftwaffe losses amounted to only three machines. The RAF lost none.

    The serious drain on fighter pilot resources was recognised by the Air Ministry on the 17th. Dowding had been pressing for Fairey Battle pilots to fill the gaps, but the Air Staff felt that wholesale withdrawals from the remaining light bomber squadrons might affect striking power on invasion day.

    Finally they agreed to five volunteers each from the four Battle squadrons and three each from Lysander Army co-operation squadrons in No. 22 Group. These were sent for a six-day O.T.U. course at Hawarden and some carried out their first operational patrol within a fortnight of volunteering.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 6 | Aircraft: 5

    British Losses
    Airmen: 0 | Aircraft: 0
     
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  11. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Sunday 18 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    Massed German formations return attacking airfields in the south and south-east.
    Night: Light bombing in Bristol, East Anglia and South Wales. Minelaying.

    Weather: Fine and fair early, cloudy for rest of day.

    Main Activity:

    The Luftwaffe’s all-out efforts to destroy Fighter Command in one week ended with a final flourish on this Sunday. The main objectives were once again airfields with a lesser effort against radar stations.

    The first of the massed formations crossed the coast about midday in the Dover area and attacked airfields to the south and south-east of London, including Kenley, Croydon, Biggin Hill and West Mailing.

    At Kenley two raids of Do 17s with Bf 109 escort came in simultaneously at 1.30 p.m., one of about fifty aircraft at altitude and the other low down at 100 feet with nine machines. The Kenley sector controller had detailed all his squadrons – No. 615 to a raid over Hawkinge, No. 64 to intercept the high raid over base, and No. 111 to intercept the low raid.

    Both raids were met, but 111 Squadron could not effectively deal with the low-flying machines as they themselves were too low and too close in over Kenley. As the approach was masked by trees and hangars, the A.A. guns were unable to open fire until the raiders were directly over the camp. Nevertheless the combined efforts of Parachute and Cable and A.A. brought down two aircraft. Both 615 and 64 Squadrons intercepted the high fliers, causing several casualties.

    Intense anti-aircraft fire and the P.A.C. barrage, with the help of the fighters, accounted for two Dorniers straight away and damaged five to such an extent that two fell in the Channel and three force-landed in France. Two aircraft returned safely out of the whole Staffel, one being flown back by the flight engineer with the pilot dead on the floor.

    Altogether 100 bombs fell on Kenley aerodrome and buildings, destroying four Hurricanes, one Blenheim, two Magisters and a Proctor and damaging six other aircraft. Ten hangars were total wrecks and many of the camp buildings demolished.

    Most of the operations-room communications were cut, nine people were killed and ten injured, including one of the medical officers killed by a hit on a shelter trench near the hospital. Fire broke out and so many local fire brigades answered the SOS that they blocked the roads leading into the airfield. The operations block was moved into a shop and within two and a half days 90 per cent of the lines had been restored by the G.P.O.

    While the station was temporarily out of action No. 615 Squadron was ordered to land and refuel at Croydon and No. 64 to go to Redhill. Due to lack of ground staff at Redhill, No. 64 in fact returned to Kenley, landing on a strip marked out between the craters.

    Croydon received nineteen bombs, which further damaged hangars and buildings, and some hits were scored at West Mailing.

    The attack on Biggin Hill was to be carried out in a similar way to that at Kenley with Ju 88s at high level and Do 17s lower down, both formations from KG 76. The high-level strike was delayed due to rendezvous difficulties over France, and the Dorniers came in on their own. The airfield defences were fully prepared and on his own initiative the station commander, Group Captain Grice, scrambled Nos. 610 and 32 Squadrons. Group orders did not come through until after the raid, due to the mass of plots on the situation map.

    As the firing died down the high-level raid came in and added its quota of bombs, although during both attacks the main damage consisted of airfield craters. KG 76 flew back to France minus four Ju 88s and six Do 17s.

    The second major assault also came in the early afternoon, when Luftflotte 3 concentrated on airfields and a radar station in the Hampshire-West Sussex area.

    Gosport was still being cleared from the raid on the 16th, when at 2.30 p.m. twenty-one Ju 88s in three groups of seven dive-bombed the airfield, wrecking buildings, engineering shops, aircraft and motor transport, but causing no casualties.

    Twenty-five Ju 87s and a flight of Bf 109s had Thorney Island, Hampshire, a 16 Group airfield, as their objective. Two hangars were hit, one aircraft destroyed and one damaged.

    Ford, a Fleet Air Arm station in Sussex, was heavily bombed, with workshops and a hangar destroyed and thick smoke rising from punctured fuel stores.

    The only radar station hit was Poling, between Arundel and Littlehampton. Ninety bombs were dropped, including many delayed action. The station was so badly damaged that a mobile unit had to be set up to cover the gap. The Poling radar masts have long since been dismantled, but to this day there is at least one unexploded bomb annually sinking deeper into the soil on the site. In these actions two squadrons, Nos. 43 and 152, between them shot down twelve Stukas, all from St.G 77. A Blenheim accounted for two Ju 87s near Thorney Island.

    In the late afternoon the third and last major attack developed when aircraft from Luftflotte 2 approached via the Thames Estuary and again attacked Croydon. Twelve Bf 109s sneaked into Manston at ground level, and destroyed two Spitfires on the ground, killing one airman and injuring fifteen others. There was also heavy air fighting over Essex.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 97 | Aircraft: 67

    British Losses
    Airmen: 10 | Aircraft: 33

    Hurricane L1921, No. 17 Squadron.
    P/O N.D. Solomon killed. Shot down by Bf 109 off Dover.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Solomon.htm

    Spitfire R6713, No. 65 Squadron.
    F/O F. Gruszka killed. Aircraft crashed at Westbere, near Canterbury, during a flight patrol.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Gruszka.htm

    Hurricane P2923, No. 85 Squadron.
    F/O R.H.A. Lee. Reported as missing. Last seen in pursuit of an enemy formation thirty miles off the east coast. Failed to return.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/LeeRHA.htm

    Hurricane R4181, No. 151 Squadron.
    P/O J.B. Ramsay. Reported as missing. Failed to return from an engagement with enemy aircraft over Chelmsford.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/RamsayJB.htm

    Hurricane R4187, No. 111 Squadron.
    F/Lt. S.D.P. Connors. Killed. Shot down by anti-aircraft fire whilst attacking Do 17s bombing Kenley.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Connors.htm

    Hurricane P3208, No. 501 Squadron.
    P/O J.W. Bland. Killed. Shot down by Bf 109 over Canterbury, Kent.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Bland.htm

    Hurricane P2549, No. 501 Squadron.
    F/Lt G.E.B. Stoney. Killed. Shot down by Bf 109. Aircraft crashed near Stile Farm, Chilham.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Stoney.htm

    Hurricane R4191, No. 601 Squadron.
    Sgt L.N. Guy. Killed. Shot down by Bf 109 off Sussex coast.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Guy.htm

    Hurricane L1990, No. 601 Squadron.
    Sgt R.P. Hawkings. Killed. Shot down by Bf 109 over the Sussex coast
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Hawkings.htm

    Hurricane P2768, No. 601 Squadron.
    Sgt P.K. Walley. Killed. Shot down by Bf 109s near Sevenoaks, Kent.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Walley.htm
     
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  12. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Monday 19 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    MONDAY 19 AUGUST 1940
    Isolated raids on Britain. Heavy reconnaissance activity.
    Night: Widespread harassing raids. Minelaying.

    Weather: Mainly cloudy. Occasional showers in the east.

    Main Activity:

    On the 19th large numbers of the enemy made threatening moves in the Channel and estuary areas, but only isolated raids came through. The most intense Luftwaffe activity was put up by the long-range reconnaissance Gruppen who carried out photographic sorties.

    At 1230 hours, sixty+ aircraft were off the coast between Dungeness and North Foreland at 20,000 feet and at 1250 hours a further fifty left Calais. Dover was the main target but the formations consisted largely of fighters. A few bombers penetrated to outer London.

    Between 1430 and 1500 hours a small secondary attack came over Dover while raids approached Portsmouth and the Southampton Docks from Luftflotte 3. One raid succeeded in setting fire to oil-tanks at Pembroke Docks. Three hours later fifty+ approached the east coast between Dungeness and Harwich and bombs fell on houses and airfields, although without much effect on the latter. Fighter Command flew 383 sorties, losing three aircraft and destroying six German machines of which two were He 111s from K.Gr.100.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 23 | Aircraft: 11

    British Losses
    Airmen: 4 | Aircraft: 5

    Blenheim L9497, No. 248 Squadron
    Sgt J.H. Round missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Round.htm
    Sgt W.H. Want missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Want.htm
    Sgt M.P. Digby-Worsley missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Digby-Worsley.htm
    Failed to return from reconnaissance mission over Southern Norway.

    Spitfire N3182, No. 66 Squadron
    P/O J.A.P. Studd killed. Hit by gunfire from He 111. Pilot baled out, rescued. Did not regain consciousness.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Studd.htm
     
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  13. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Tuesday 20 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    TUESDAY 20 AUGUST 1940
    Scattered raids in the morning. Kent and Essex airfields attacked during the afternoon.
    Night: Very little activity. One or two raids in the south-west.

    Weather: Generally cloudy, rain spreading from the north. Channel mainly fine.

    Main Activity:

    The weather was autumnal, with low clouds, strong winds and intermittent rain which restricted German operations. The Luftflotten planning staffs spent the day digesting Göring’s requirements outlined on the 19th. These were contained in orders put out by the Luftwaffe Command Staff IA which covered ‘the weakening of enemy fighter forces, attacks on the enemy ground organisation, the aircraft industry, and aluminium and steel rolling mills’.

    Activity over Britain in the morning was limited to small raids on Cheltenham, Oxford and Southwold, while reconnaissance aircraft surveyed Duxford, Debden, North Weald, Hatfield, Northolt and Hornchurch airfields. At 1124 hours, bombs were again dropped on the oil-tanks at Pembroke Docks, still burning from the previous day.

    During the afternoon several waves of aircraft came in from Calais, starting just after 1400 hours. Objectives were the balloon barrage at Dover and the airfields of Eastchurch, Manston and West Mailing. There were also isolated raids on convoy ‘Agent’ off the east coast and on S.S. Orford off Anglesey. Twelve fighter squadrons were despatched to intercept, but due to bad weather only accounted for six enemy aircraft in the course of 453 sorties, although one was a four-engined FW 200 over Ireland. Two RAF aircraft were lost during the day. The Polish Air Force had its first success over Britain, No. 302 Squadron destroying a Junkers 88.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 11 | Aircraft: 8

    British Losses
    Airmen: 1 | Aircraft: 2

    Hurricane P2976, No. 242 Squadron
    Mid. (FAA) P J Patterson missing. Crashed into sea during combat action.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/PattersonPJ.htm
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2022
  14. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-a...ust/20/20200820-battle-of-britain-anniversary

    Eight minutes to four on the afternoon of August 20 1940. The weather in southern England this Tuesday was autumnal: cool, windy, with intermittent showers.
    It ruled out major actions by the German Air Force, which was one week into its onslaught against the British homeland.

    For the past hour MPs had filled the Parliamentary chamber. Even during the greatest threat Britain had faced since Napoleon, democracy functioned largely as normal.

    For a little over an hour, politicians had debated a raft of issues affecting their people and their nation in wartime: the Home Guard, overtime payments, the export of coffee from neutral lands to Germany, dealing with conscientious objectors, the employment of miners, and the rationing of plums, not to mention civil defence – protecting homes from the hail of bombs raining down on Britain day after day.

    The daily business now gave way to the prime minister and an update on the war.

    Winston Churchill would be on his feet for 48 minutes, as he informed fellow MPs of Britain’s military situation. “Our Navy is far stronger than it was at the beginning of the war," he assured his audience. There were now more than two million men under arms. Britain was now a fortress island. Its factories churned out war material as never before. Any German attempt to set foot in the mother country would be met with fire and fury. “The whole Island bristles against invaders, from the sea or from the air.”

    It was another powerhouse performance from the premier, probably the last of his great rallying cries in the spring and summer of 1940, but the world would largely remember just one sentence.

    As he turned to the “great air battle”, he singled out the men who rose to the challenge, faced down the mortal danger and were “turning the tide of world war by their prowess and by their devotion.”

    Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

    Britain’s fate in the summer of 1940 rested largely on the skill and bravery of fewer than 3,000 aviators, mostly RAF, but also foreign volunteers such as Czechs and Poles.

    The role of the small band of naval aviators who fought that summer is usually written out of post-war accounts, especially in big-screen depictions such as the all-star blockbuster Battle of Britain.

    As early as the first week in June, the Admiralty had given up more than 40 semi-trained pilots to the RAF, 30 more would join them.

    In all 57 naval pilots (“The Few of The Few”) would fly for the air force in the Battle of Britain; four of the 57 became ‘aces’ (downing at least five enemy aircraft).

    Londoner Sub Lieutenant Francis Dawson-Paul led the way with seven and a half ‘kills’ – in just 25 days: fighters, twin-engined fighters and bombers all fell victim to his Spitfire. He was shot down over the Channel and though rescued by the Germans, he died of his wounds aged 24 on July 30 1940 – not six weeks after becoming a fighter pilot.

    Other flames burned brightly briefly, then were snuffed out.

    Fellow Spitfire ace Sub Lt Arthur Blake was dubbed ‘sailor’ or ‘admiral’ by his 19 Squadron comrades. He was 23 when he was shot down over Essex two days before the official end of the battle.

    Sub Lt ‘Dickie’ Cork flew with the legendary ‘tin-legged’ Douglas Bader and his 242 Squadron.

    Cork was Bader’s wingman during the battle, a popular character who remained proud of his naval heritage despite his RAF comrade’s constant ribbing and efforts to draw him over to the ‘dark side’.

    Bader nominated ‘Corkie’, as he called him, for the DFC and George VI approved the award… much to the chagrin of the Admiralty who demanded their man return the air force decoration in favour of the DSC. He refused.

    Dickie Cork was one of three naval fliers in Bader’s squadron and features frequently in the air force officer’s biography… but not in the biographical film Reach for the Sky.

    After the battle he returned to his naval roots and became the Fleet Air Arm’s fifth highest-scoring ace of the war. His luck ran out in April 1944, killed in a flying accident while landing in Ceylon (today Sri Lanka).

    Naval aviators loaned to the RAF at least flew aircraft which could hold their own against the Luftwaffe. The two Naval Air Squadrons involved in the battle – 804 and 808 – were woefully equipped.

    Protecting the Navy’s principal wartime base at Scapa Flow, the men flew Sea Gladiator biplanes or the two-seat Fairey Fulmar. All German bombers – apart from the lumbering Stukas – outmatched them, let alone fighters.

    In all, seven naval pilots were killed and two wounded between July 10 and October 31 1940 – the official dates of the battle. Their names – and the 48 other Fleet Air Arm men who fought in Britain’s skies that fateful summer are listed on the Battle of Britain memorial in London.
     
  15. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Wednesday 21 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    WEDNESDAY 21 AUGUST 1940
    Small raids on airfields in the east and south.
    Night: Slight activity including Scotland.

    Weather: Cloudy, occasional rain.

    Main Activity:

    The bad weather continued throughout the day, and the Luftwaffe resorted to ‘tip-and-run’ raids round the east and south coasts. Instead of mass attacks, small formations or single aircraft were used in some cases, while others had groups of three divided into two at low level and one stepped up.

    Fighter Command had difficulty in meeting this type of attack but 599 sorties yielded thirteen German aircraft destroyed for the loss of one British fighter.

    Airfields attacked or threatened were Exeter, St. Eval, Horsham, St. Faith, Bircham Newton, Ford, Coltishall, Stradishall and Watton. Bombs were also dropped on Grimbsy, Norwich, Canterbury, Southampton, Newmarket, Bournemouth and Pembroke.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 29 | Aircraft: 14

    British Losses
    Airmen: 0 | Aircraft: 4
     
  16. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Thursday 22 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    THURSDAY 22 AUGUST 1940
    Shipping reconnaissance and attacks on two Channel convoys.
    Night: Increased activity particularly in the Midlands, north and west. Some minelaying.

    Weather: Cloudy and squally.

    Main Activity:

    At 0900 hours the convoy ‘Totem’ was passing through the Straits of Dover and reported being under air attack. Investigation showed that it was in fact being shelled by the German heavy batteries near Cap Gris Nez. The first bombardment lasted eighty minutes and 100 shells were fired without effect.

    Failure of the guns brought the Luftwaffe into action and at 1240 hours some forty aircraft attacked the convoy, but were beaten off by Nos. 54 and 65 squadrons.

    Apart from a few reconnaissance flights, the day remained quiet until 1850 hours when a series of raids developed against Dover during the course of which Manston was again hit.

    Five RAF aircraft were lost for the destruction of two German—a poor repayment for 509 Fighter Command sorties, which were again hampered by bad weather.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 9 | Aircraft: 4

    British Losses
    Airmen: 2 | Aircraft: 2

    Spitfire R6708, No. 54 Squadron
    Sgt G.R. Collett killed. Shot down into the sea. Body was washed up on beach on Dutch coast.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Collett.htm

    Spitfire K9909, No. 65 Squadron
    Sgt M. Keymer killed. Shot down by Bf 109 into Channel. Buried at Bazinghem, France.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Keymer.htm
     
  17. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Friday 23 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    FRIDAY 23 AUGUST 1940
    Single raids in the south and reconnaissance flights.
    Night: Main attacks in South Wales.

    Weather: Showers with bright intervals. Cloudy in Straits, Channel and Thames Estuary.

    Main Activity:

    Low cloud and rain continued throughout this Friday, limiting operations once again to guerrilla warfare by single, or occasionally flights of two or three machines.

    Outer London, Tangmere, St. Albans, Portsmouth, Maidstone, Cromer, Harwich, Southampton, Colchester, Biggin Hill and Abingdon reported small attacks, while the east coast convoys were bombed. Of the raiders attempting to penetrate the London defences, several jettisoned their bombs in the suburbs—houses, a bank and two cinemas being hit. Fighter Command’s 482 sorties showed five German aircraft destroyed without British loss.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 20 | Aircraft: 8

    British Losses
    Airmen: 0 | Aircraft: 1
     
  18. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Saturday 24 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    SATURDAY 24 AUGUST 1940
    Airfield attacks in south-east; Manston evacuated. Heavy raid on Portsmouth.
    Night: Heavier attacks over wide area. Minelaying.

    Weather: Fine and clear in the south, drizzle in the north.

    Main Activity:

    The early part of the Saturday morning was cloudless and fine and the controllers in 11 Group watched anxiously for the inevitable signs of a built-up over France. At 0900 hours a big raid began to boil up around Cap Gris Nez and some 100 fighters and bombers of Fliegerkorps II advanced on Dover, stepped-up from 12,000 to 24,000 feet. Two formations broke away from the mass in mid-Channel and attacked Dover itself from the north. Eleven fighter squadrons were despatched and the raid broke up at about 1100 hours.

    An hour and a half later a series of feints developed, from which one raid was detached to attack Manston, as No. 264 Squadron’s defensive patrol for the airfield landed. The nine Defiants took off before the first bombs were dropped, and were then joined by a Hurricane squadron. The force was driven off with a loss of five bombers and two fighters but not before extensive damage had been done.

    At 1530 hours another big raid stacked up over Le Havre, and flew to Manston and Ramsgate. The Manston attack was to be the last straw for the station. The living quarters were now badly damaged, hardly any buildings remained intact, all telephone and teleprinter lines were cut and the field was littered with unexploded bombs.

    Before the afternoon raid, at 1415 hours, all communication between Manston and 11 Group ceased. The controller at II Group contacted No. 1 Observer Group at Maidstone to see if the Corps could find out what was going on. A mile from Manston was Post A.1, and Observer Foad volunteered to cycle to the airfield and obtain information. Coastal airfields had been reduced to dire straits.

    When the cable maintenance inspector at Manston was informed that all lines had gone he took two jointers and went to the particular crater despite the continuing explosion of delayed action bombs. Working like beavers, and with only an occasional glance at a large bomb adjacent to them, the three men got the essential circuits (out of 248 severed) restored in two hours and completed permanent restoration the following day.

    As soon as word got through of the state of the station Fighter Command decided to evacuate it, except as an emergency airfield. Administrative personnel were transferred permanently to Westgate while the remainder of No. 600 Squadron’s Blenheims were moved to Hornchurch.

    Part of the raiding force split before reaching Manston, and one section attacked the small aerodrome at Ramsgate. The town itself was heavily hit and whole rows of seaside villas were wiped out with a number of casualties.

    Concurrently with the south coast attacks, another raid flew to targets north of the Estuary, especially Hornchurch and North Weald, where high-altitude techniques were used. The No. 264 Squadron Defiants, withdrawn from Manston to Hornchurch earlier in the day, found themselves once more in the fray at 1545 hours, and just airborne as bombs began to rain down.

    At North Weald nearly fifty Dorniers and He 111s escorted by Bf 109s dropped 150 to 200 bombs. The airmen’s and officers’ married quarters suffered severely, and the power house was badly damaged. Nine people were killed and ten wounded.

    No. 12 Group were called upon to assist over North Weald and Hornchurch, but the Duxford wing was flown in too late to have any major effect.

    With the raiders approaching London, the city registered its 11th, 12th and 13th air raid warnings, but the population did not seem unduly perturbed. In Regent’s Park, where A Midsummer Night’s Dream was being performed, few of the audience moved. They seemed to find very appropriate Titania’s wish ‘To each word a warbling note’.

    While the sector stations were under fire a formation of 100 Luftflotte 3 fighters and bombers from North of the Somme headed for Portsmouth and Southampton. They managed to get well towards the coast before their targets were deduced from radar, which was cluttered with other tracks.

    At Portsmouth only one fighter squadron was near enough to intercept, and that was still climbing when fifty bombers were heavily fired on by the anti-aircraft guns. The aircraft jettisoned their loads broadcast over the city, causing much damage and killing 100 civilians.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 46 | Aircraft: 41

    British Losses
    Airmen: 10 | Aircraft: 20

    Hurricane P3141, No. 501 Squadron
    P/O P. Zenker listed as missing. Failed to return to base after combat with Do 17s and Bf 109s.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Zenker.htm

    Defiant N1535, No. 264 Squadron
    S/L P.A. Hunter listed as missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/HunterPA.htm
    P/O F.H. King listed as missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/KingFH.htm
    Last seen chasing Ju 88 out to sea after attack on Manston.

    Defiant L6966, No. 264 Squadron
    P/O J.T. Jones listed as missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/JonesJT.htm
    P/O W.A. Ponting listed as missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Ponting.htm
    Last seen in combat with Ju 88s & Bf 109s over the Channel.

    Defiant L7027, No. 264 Squadron
    F/O I.G. Shaw listed as missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/ShawIG.htm
    Sgt A. Berry listed as missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/BerryA.htm
    Possibly shot down by Bf 109 into Channel after raid on Manston.

    Defiant L6965, No. 264 Squadron
    Sgt W.H. Machin died of wounds.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Machin.htm
    Shot down by Bf 109 over base. Pilot was slightly injured.

    Blenheim T1804, No. 235 Squadron
    P/O D.N. Woodger listed as missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Woodger.htm
    Sgt D.L. Wright killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/WrightDL.htm
    Shot down by Hurricanes of No. 1 (RCAF) Squadron and crashed into Bracklesham Bay.
     
  19. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    https://battleofbritain1940.com/entry/sunday-25-august-1940/
    SUNDAY 25 AUGUST 1940
    Slight activity in the morning, main raids by Luftflotte 3 in the south-west during the afternoon.
    Night: Continued widespread attacks with the main concentration in the Midlands.

    Weather: Early morning fair but remainder of day cloudy.

    Main Activity:

    For most of the morning and afternoon of Wednesday the Luftwaffe rested, although the Channel was filled with small formations which kept the radar plotters busy waiting to see which would turn north and become a genuine raid.

    At 1700 hours 50+ appeared near St. Malo and proceeded to Cherbourg where escort and escorted swelled the ranks to 100. Off the Channel Islands another raid of 30+ built up, and behind it further formations of 20, 60 and 20 joined up to form a mass of 100+ aircraft which headed for Weymouth.

    Two squadrons, judiciously placed by 10 Group, intercepted, but were unable to get through the fighter screen which numbered nearly 200. A third squadron fared no better and the bombers attacked Warmwell aerodrome, dropping twenty bombs. Two hangars were damaged and the station sick quarters burnt out. Nine-unexploded bombs were left to be dealt with, and communications were disorganised until noon on the following day. Bombs also fell on Fareham, Pembroke and the Scilly Isles, at the last mentioned a direct hit being scored on the RAF wireless station.

    Within an hour a further mass raid of 100 headed from Cap Gris Nez for Dover and the Estuary, but was attacked by several of the eleven fighter squadrons sent up. This final action brought Fighter Command’s losses for the day to sixteen with nine pilots dead, four missing and four wounded.

    The Luftwaffe left behind twenty aircraft and their crews, but after nightfall they had it all their own way, carrying out widespread attacks without suffering any loss. Some mines were laid on the east, south and west coasts, while most of the sixty-five raids plotted in attacked industrial centres in the midlands, where bombs fell on forty places, including Birmingham, Coventry and towns in, southern England, South Wales and Scotland. Montrose, a fighter airfield between Dundee and Aberdeen, was the recipient of an unexpected attack.

    While German bombers droned over England, eighty-one twin-engined RAF bombers were heading the other way—for Berlin. Industrial and communications targets were the orders for the night. Cloud prevented accurate identification and bombs were dropped on several sections of the city, some damage being done to residential property. The RAF raid was a reprisal for the German bombing of London the previous night. This incursion into Germany territory was the first of several and within a fortnight there were to be far-reaching results with changed Luftwaffe daylight tactics, and a reprieve for Fighter Command.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 20 | Aircraft: 23

    British Losses
    Airmen: 13 | Aircraft: 18

    Spitfire R6810, No. 152 Squadron
    P/O R.M. Hogg listed as missing. Shot down by Bf 109s over Channel and crashed into sea.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/HoggRM.htm

    Spitfire R6994, No. 152 Squadron
    P/O T.S. Wildblood listed as missing. Shot down by Bf 109s over Channel and crashed into sea.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Wildblood.htm

    Hurricane V7226, No. 213 Squadron
    P/O J.A.L. Phillipart killed. Shot down by Bf 109 over Channel. Body washed ashore two days later.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Philippart.htm

    Hurricane R4199, No. 17 Squadron
    S/L C.W. Williams listed as missing. Aircraft broke in two after combat with Bf 110. Crashed into sea.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/WilliamsCW.htm

    Hurricane P3200, No. 213 Squadron
    P/O H.D. Atkinson listed as missing. Last seen in combat over Warmwell. Failed to return to base.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/AtkinsonHD.htm

    Hurricane V7250, No. 87 Squadron
    Sgt. S.R.E Wakeling killed. Shot down by Bf 109 and burst into flames and crashed near Dorchester.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Wakeling.htm

    Hurricane N2433, No. 32 Squadron
    P/O K.R. Gillman listed as missing. Failed to return to base after combat over the Channel.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Gillman.htm

    Spitfire R6966, No. 616 Squadron
    Sgt. T.E. Westmoreland listed as missing. Failed to return to base.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Westmoreland.htm

    Spitfire K9819, No. 616 Squadron
    Sgt. P.T. Wareing taken prisoner. Crashed nr Calais after combat with Bf 109. Managed to escape after POW.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Wareing.htm

    Blenheim L1330, No. 29 Squadron
    P/O R.A. Rhodes listed as missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Rhodes.htm
    AC1 N. Jacobson listed as missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Jacobson.htm
    Believed shot down and crashed into sea during night combat.

    Blenheim L6782, No. 604 Squadron
    Sgt. C. Haigh killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Haigh.htm
    Sgt. J.G.B. Fletcher killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/FletcherJGB.htm
    LAC A.L. Austin died next day.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/AustinAL.htm
    Crashed during night operation. No known reason.
     
  20. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Monday 26 August 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    MONDAY 26 AUGUST 1940
    Dover, Folkestone and airfields in Kent and Essex attacked. Lesser raids in the Solent.
    Night: Widespread raids, Industrial areas and airfields the main targets.

    Weather: Mainly cloudy but dry. Brighter in the south.

    Main Activity:

    This was another day of widespread activity in the course of which the Luftwaffe delivered three main attacks: (a) on Kenley and Biggin Hill, (b) on Hornchurch, North Weald, Debden and east London, and (c) on Portsmouth and the aerodromes at Warmwell in No. 10 Group.

    Following several reconnaissance flights, Luftflotte 2 put in an appearance just after 1100 hours when 150 aircraft were crossing the coast at Deal. Bombs dropped on Folkestone and more balloons were set on fire at Dover, but the main effort was directed at Biggin Hill and Kenley. Six squadrons and three flights from No. 11 Group intercepted well forward, and the raids were broken up.

    In the early afternoon a second Luftwaffe concentration was observed by radar to be forming up over Lille. Further units joined it from St. Omer and Calais, until raids of 60+, 20+ and 30+ were being plotted in towards Dover and Harwich.

    The main objectives for the bombers from KG 2 and KG 3 off Harwich were North Weald and Hornchurch, with diversions in the east London area. Their efforts were disorganised by 11 Group which put up ten squadrons and one flight. One section of the raid fared better, however, and despite the attentions of two RAF fighter squadrons it successfully reached the sector station at Debden. Over 100 bombs damaged the landing area, the sergeants’ mess, the NAAFI, a motor transport depot and the equipment section. Both electricity and water mains were hit and five personnel killed.

    A squadron from Duxford had been sent up to patrol Debden, but due to late vectoring saw nothing of the enemy. Hurricanes of No. 310 (Czechoslovak) Squadron attempted to catch the raid as it left the Debden area, but most of them were unable to get proper courses to steer as they lacked the right radio-frequencies.

    At 1600 hours, 150 aircraft of Luftflotte 3 approached Portsmouth at high altitude while two small diversions were laid on in an attempt to distract the fighters. No. 11 Group despatched five squadrons and No. 10 Group three. Independently three of the squadrons intercepted the formation short of the target, destroying three Heinkel 111s from KG 55 and causing many of the bombers to jettison their loads in the sea. By 1700 hours the raid had been repulsed. This was Luftflotte 3’s last major effort in daylight for some weeks, as its units concentrated on night bombing. To Nos. 10 and 11 Groups it had been one of their most bitter fights with twenty-eight aircraft lost in one engagement, out of thirty-one for the day. Four pilots were killed near Portsmouth, and twelve were wounded. Altogether Fighter Command flew 787 sorties, over 300 more than on the 25th. The losses in pilots were rising alarmingly and replacements were few.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 44 | Aircraft: 42

    British Losses
    Airmen: 7 | Aircraft: 29

    Spitfire R6633, No. 616 Squadron
    Sgt. M. Ridley killed. Hit by gunfire from Bf 109 over Kent coast. Crashed near town.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Ridley.htm

    Spitfire N3275, No. 616 Squadron
    F/O G.E. Moberley killed. Shot down over Channel by B109. Pilot did not bale out of aircraft.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Moberly.htm

    Defiant L6985, No. 264 Squadron
    Sgt. B. Baker listed as missing. Crashed into Thames Estuary after hit by gunfire from Bf 109. Pilot safe.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/BakerB.htm

    Defiant L7025, No. 264 Squadron
    Sgt. W. Maxwell listed as missing. Crashed into Thames Estuary after hit by gunfire from Bf 109. Pilot safe.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/MaxwellW.htm

    Spitfire R6595, No. 610 Squadron
    P/O F.K. Webster killed. Badly damaged by Bf 109. Crashed in flames attempting to land at Hawkinge.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/WebsterFK.htm

    Hurricane P3874, No. 1 (RCAF) Squadron
    F/O R.L. Edwards killed. Shot down by gunfire from Do 17 during attack on Debden Airfield.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/EdwardsRL.htm
     
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