So it Began.....Their Finest Hour

Discussion in 'The War In The Air' started by Gage, Jul 10, 2011.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    'THE FEW' WERE SUPPORTED BY MANY
    Many people in addition to Churchill’s ‘Few’ worked to defend Britain. Ground crew – including riggers, fitters, armourers, and repair and maintenance engineers – looked after the aircraft. Factory workers helped keep aircraft production up. The Observer Corps tracked incoming raids – its tens of thousands of volunteers ensured that the 1,000 observation posts were continuously manned. Anti-aircraft gunners, searchlight operators and barrage balloon crews all played vital roles in Britain’s defence. Members of the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF) served as radar operators and worked as plotters, tracking raids in the group and sector operations rooms. The Local Defence Volunteers (later the Home Guard) had been set up in May 1940 as a ‘last line of defence’ against German invasion. By July, nearly 1.5 million men had enrolled.
    8 Things You Need To Know About The Battle Of Britain
     
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  2. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/8-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-battle-of-britain

    ALL OF THE RAF HELPED DEFEND BRITAIN
    The RAF was organised into different ‘Commands’ based on function or role, including Fighter, Bomber and Coastal Commands. While victory in the Battle of Britain was decisively gained by Fighter Command, defence was carried out by the whole of the Royal Air Force. Britain’s most senior military personnel understood the importance of the bomber in air defence. They wrote on 25 May: ‘We cannot resist invasion by fighter aircraft alone. An air striking force is necessary not only to meet the sea-borne expedition, but also to bring direct pressure to bear upon Germany by attacking objectives in that country’.
     
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  3. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

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  4. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Remembering the Pilots of the Battle of Britain | CWGC

    From July to October 1940, much of the fighting during World War Two in Western Europe was concentrated in the skies above the channel and the south of England, pitting the might of the German Luftwaffe against the pilots of the RAF.
     
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  5. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

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  6. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Battle of Britain - Wikipedia

    History of the Battle of Britain | Exhibitions & Displays | Research | RAF Museum

    The Battle of Britain Phase Five
    3rd October – 31st October

    “In their ‘finest hour’ the British behaved quite differently from the way in which they usually seek to portray themselves. They exhibited a talent for planning and organisation which, in its Teutonic thoroughness, far outstripped that of the Germans. They left little to chance, planned for the worst case and did not rely on luck. Given all this, it is hardly surprising that they won.”

    Stephen Bungay
     
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  7. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Mixed force of bombers and fighters attacked Yeovil.
    Monday 7 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    Night: Major raids on London and Merseyside. Lesser attacks from Harwich to Newcastle and the Firth of Forth.

    Weather: Occasional showers. Visibility fair with variable cloud.

    Main Activity:

    In the morning 127 German planes were engaged by eighteen No. 11 Group squadrons over Kent and Sussex.

    The attack resumed at 12.30 when Luftflotte 2 again sent over a series of small waves from Calais to Dover. More than 150 Bf 109s flew in and No. 11 Group had to call upon No. 12 Group to stand by. For the third attack at 3.30 p.m. the Luftwaffe again used Bf 109s and sent in fifty via Dymchurch.

    These machines made for Biggin Hill and London. At the same time a mixed force of Ju 88s, Bf 109s and Bf 110s from Cherbourg in formations stepped up to 26,000 feet delivered an attack with eighty high-explosive and six oil-bombs on the Westland aircraft works at Yeovil.

    Between 5 and 9 p.m. seven raids were plotted from Cherbourg to Swansea, eleven from Le Havre to Selsey Bill, twenty-seven from Dieppe to Beachy Head, two from Cap Gris Nez to Dungeness, twenty-six from Holland to Harwich, Newcastle and Spurn Head, and seven from Denmark to the Firth of Forth. Hostile efforts were mainly concentrated on London and Merseyside although bombs on Hatfield damaged three Lysanders belonging to No. 239 Squadron, an aircraft was destroyed at Ford and other bombs fell on Westhampnett, Tangmere, Eastleigh and Lee-on-Solent. Bomber Command countered the flow of traffic with a raid of 147 bombers on the German capital and the invasion ports.

    In Berlin, meanwhile, Göring put a new five-point plan for the war against Britain. In it he frankly admitted that the demoralisation of London and the provinces was one aim and he described the air operations against the islands as ‘merely an initial phase’. The plan he outlined demanded:

    1. Absolute control of the Channel and the English coastal areas.

    2. Progressive and complete annihilation of London, with all its military objectives and industrial production.

    3. A steady paralysing of Britain’s technical, commercial, industrial and civil life.

    4. Demoralisation of the civil population of London and its provinces.

    5. Progressive weakening of Britain’s forces.

    Far from being progressively weakened, the RAF was fighting back with increased strength. On the 7th Fighter Command flew 825 sorties and lost 17 planes to the Luftwaffe’s 21 one of which was an He 115 seaplane.

    Examination of eight Bf 109s shot down on the 7th revealed that they were from LG 2 and each carried a 250 kg. bomb. They were operating in small formations of 6–18 aircraft and flying 2–3 sorties per day.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster



     
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  8. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Month: October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    London and airfields bombed.
    Night: Heavy raid on London.

    Weather: Cloudy in the Channel with rain in northern France and the Straits of Dover.

    Main Activity:

    Targets in Kent and London were again on the Luftwaffe’s agenda and from 11 a.m. until 1.15 p.m. 120 Bf 109s flew in. By 2.20 p.m. they had returned in greater numbers.

    Between 160 and 180 aircraft were involved and the damage they did to some of the airfields was as serious as that inflicted during August and September.

    Over 400 Hurricane and Spitfire sorties were flown. Nine German planes were destroyed for the loss of one British fighter.

    In Berlin, meanwhile, Göring had consulted the calendar. As his Luftflotten were preparing for their night raids on Britain he issued directives for heavy attacks on London during the next full moon. The moon was then in its first quarter, which meant London could expect some exceptionally noisy nights from about October 15th.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 18 | Aircraft: 9

    British Losses
    Airmen: 5 | Aircraft: 3

    Hurricane V7376, No. 1 Squadron
    Sgt. S. Warren listed as ‘missing’. Failed to return from section cloud formation flight over the Wash.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/WarrenS.htm

    Spitfire X4597, No. 92 Squadron
    Sgt. E.T.J. Frith died of injuries 17/10/40. Shot down believed by Bf 109s. Pilot baled out badly burned.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Frith.htm

    Blenheim N3530, No. 235 Squadron
    Shot down by Bf 109s over the Channel.
    P/O J.C. Kirkpatrick listed as ‘missing’.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Kirkpatrick.htm
    P/O R.C. Thomas killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/ThomasRC.htm
    Sgt. G.E. Keel killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Keel.htm
     
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  9. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    10th October 1940

    Thursday 10 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline


    Raids over Kent, London suburbs and Weymouth.
    Night: London, Manchester and fifteen airfields attacked.

    Weather: Showery with bright intervals. Haze in the Thames Estuary and East Anglia.

    Main Activity:

    Having failed to get through en masse the Luftwaffe was now infiltrating in continuous streams. These tactics were difficult to combat and the decrease in the rate of German loss was worrying Fighter Command.

    In the course of 754 sorties the RAF lost five machines, against the Luftwaffe’s four.

    Manchester, London and Liverpool were again assailed, and following up on Göring’s directive, fifteen RAF airfields were bombed.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 13 | Aircraft: 12

    British Losses
    Airmen: 6 | Aircraft: 8

    Hurricane P3421, No. 56 Squadron
    Sgt. J. Hlavac killed. Shot down in combat with Bf 109s over Wareham. http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Hlavac.htm

    Spitfire X4038, No. 92 Squadron
    P/O D.G. Williams killed. Mid-air collision during attack on a Do 17 over Tangmere.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/WiliamsDG.htm

    Spitfire R6616, No. 92 Squadron
    F/O J.F. Drummond killed. Mid-air collision during attack on a Do 17 over Tangmere. Pilot baled out, wounded in an arm and a leg, but was too low.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Drummond.htm

    Hurricane V7537, No. 249 Squadron
    Sgt. E.A. Bayley killed. Aircraft crashed at Shades House, Cooling Marsh during routine patrol. Believed due to oxygen failure.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Bayley.htm

    Hurricane L1928, No. 253 Squadron
    Sgt. H.H. Allgood killed. Aircraft crashed into houses at Albion Place, Maidstone. Cause unknown.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Allgood.htm

    Hurricane L1547, No. 312 Squadron
    Sgt. O. Hanzlicek killed. Aircraft caught fire during routine patrol, cause unknown. Pilot baled out into river at Oglett.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Hanzlicek.htm
     
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  10. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Friday 11 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    11th October 1940


    Targets in Kent, Sussex and Weymouth attacked.

    Night: Raids on London, Liverpool, Manchester and Tyne and Tees.

    Weather: Mainly fair apart from showers in coastal areas. Fog developed during the night.

    Main Activity:

    Four fighter sweeps over Kent and Sussex and two over Weymouth by Bf 109s flying at heights of up to 33,000 feet occupied the southern sector fighters throughout the day.

    At 10 a.m. 100 Bf 109s assembled at Cap Gris Nez and crossed the coast at Hastings. They attacked Folkestone, Deal, Canterbury and Ashford. An hour later another stream went for Biggin Hill and Kenley. At 2.15 p.m. about 100 aircraft reached Southend and by 4 p.m. a similar number penetrated as far as Maidstone and Tonbridge.

    Altogether seven German aircraft were destroyed. Fighter Command squadrons, which flew 949 sorties, lost nine machines, but only three pilots. Six pilots were wounded.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 17 | Aircraft: 10

    British Losses
    Airmen: 4 | Aircraft: 9

    Spitfire X4052, No. 41 Squadron
    F/O D.H. O’Neill killed. Mid-air collision with Spitfire X4554 during a battle climb to engage Bf 109s.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/ONeillDH.htm

    Spitfire P9447, No. 41 Squadron
    P/O J.G. Lecky killed. Shot down in combat with Bf 109s. Pilot baled out but was killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Lecky.htm

    Spitfire P7303, No. 421 Flight
    Sgt. C.A.H. Ayling killed. Aircraft crashed at Newchurch after combat with enemy aircraft over Hawkinge.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Ayling.htm

    Spitfire P7323, No. 611 Squadron
    Sgt. K.C. Pattison critically injured (died 13/10/40). Aircraft badly damaged by return fire from Do 17 over Kidderminster in Worcestershire.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/PattisonKC.htm
     
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  11. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Saturday 12 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    12th October 1940

    London and suburbs are again the main targets.
    Night: Generally quiet, but some damage to the National Gallery.

    Weather: Widespread mist and fog during the day, clearing later.

    Main Activity:

    The point had now been reached where Hitler had to decide on his next course of action. It was evident towards the end of September that Seelöwe could not be accomplished before the end of the year. Bomber Command had sunk 214 barges and twenty-one transports of the invasion fleet which in any case had been forced to disperse. He was thus compelled in October to choose between stopping this dispersal or postponing the whole project indefinitely.

    As the bombs fell on Biggin Hill, Chatham and Piccadilly, Keitel circulated Hitler’s decision:

    The Führer [he wrote] has decided that from now until the spring, preparations for Sealion shall be continued solely for the purpose of maintaining political and military pressure on England.

    Should the Invasion be reconsidered in the spring or early summer of 1941, orders for a renewal of operational readiness will be issued later. In the meantime military conditions for a later invasion are to be improved.

    The significance of this memorandum was not to be realised at the War Office, damaged at nine o’clock that evening by a direct hit, nor at Bentley Priory, until very much later. Hitler had admitted defeat nineteen days before the Battle of Britain officially came to a close.

    Despite mist and fog, October 12th was a day of almost uninterrupted German activity the RAF did not find easy to counter. Raids on London and the south-east started at 8.45 a.m. and went on until late afternoon.

    Met in force by the British, who flew 797 sorties, the Germans had difficulty reaching their objectives. They lost eleven planes. British aircraft destroyed numbered ten.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 7 | Aircraft: 13

    British Losses
    Airmen: 5 | Aircraft: 11

    Spitfire P9338, No. 72 Squadron
    P/O H.R. Case killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Case.htm

    Spitfire X4591, No. 92 Squadron
    F/O A.J.S. Pattinson killed. Shot down and killed by Bf 109s over Hawkinge.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Pattinson.htm

    Hurricane V7426, No. 145 Squadron
    Sgt. J.V. Wadham killed. Shot down and killed by Bf 109s over Hastings.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Wadham.htm

    Blenheim L1113, No. 219 Squadron
    P/O R.V. Baron killed. Baled out of aircraft but parachute failed to open.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Baron.htm

    Hurricane P3022, No. 605 Squadron
    Sgt. P.R.C. McIntosh killed. Shot down in action against Bf 109s over the Channel off Dungeness.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/McIntosh.htm
     
  12. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Sunday 13 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    13 October 1940

    Targets in Kent and London raided.
    Night: London, Bristol, Wales, Liverpool, Birmingham and Birkenhead all bombed.

    Weather: Early fog clearing to blue skies. Cloud later.

    Main Activity:

    Although Hitler had unofficially conceded victory to Fighter Command, Park, still striving to work out effective counter-measures to the Germans’ high-flying tactics, could certainly not have agreed that the Luftwaffe was defeated. The Germans had simply been prevented from achieving their objectives but they were still taking every opportunity to harass the RAF.

    The first threats on this day were small and they developed off the east coast where a convoy was attacked. London was then selected for the next three raids which began at 12.30 p.m. when a force of fifty Bf 109s reached Woolwich. An hour later a slightly larger force fanned out over Kent and made its way to the capital. The third formation of twenty-five Bf 109s got to the centre of London at 4 p.m. in spite of spirited opposition.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 0 | Aircraft: 6

    British Losses
    Airmen: 3 | Aircraft: 4

    Blenheim L6637, No. 29 Squadron
    Shot down in error by Hurricanes of No. 312 Czech Squadron over the Point of Ayr, SW of Liverpool.
    Sgt. R.E. Stevens killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/StevensRE.htm
    Sgt. O.K. Sly killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Sly.htm
    AC2 A. Jackson killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/JacksonA.htm
     
  13. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    14th October 1940
    Monday 14 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline
    Widespread limited attacks.
    Night: Serious and widespread damage to London. Coventry also damaged.

    Weather: Occasional rain or drizzle spreading to the south-east.

    Main Activity:

    It was 10.15 a.m. before the Germans showed signs of serious business. Fifty small raids were then picked up heading for the south-east and the south midlands. Some passed over north London aerodromes, including North Weald, which was by now showing the effects of nearly 400 accurately aimed bombs. Hardly a building had escaped so that dispersal and improvisation were necessary to keep the four squadrons going.

    More than 100 patrols involving 272 fighters were flown. They neither scored nor lost. Three German aircraft were destroyed, nevertheless, in accidents.

    Although the East End of London bore the main burden of the early German attacks, it was not long before the West End was sharing its bombing experiences with the poorer sections of the capital.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 1 | Aircraft: 4

    British Losses
    Airmen: 1 | Aircraft: 1

    Hurricane P3107, No. 605 Squadron
    F/O R. Hope killed. Aircraft brought down by balloon cable or anti-aircraft fire.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/HopeR.htm
     
  14. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Tuesday 15 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    15th October 1940

    London, the Thames Estuary and Kent all attacked.
    Night: Unusually heavy attack on London and Birmingham.

    Weather: Fair but cloudy in the Straits. Clear, moonlit night.

    Main Activity:

    At 9 a.m. thirty Messerschmitts were heading for Hornchurch and central London. They hit Waterloo Station and blocked all but two of the lines. At 9.45 another fifty went for the city and at 11.20 more came in to attack points in Kent and the Estuary. By 12.20 p.m. 110 were plotted in the Straits but these did not mature into a full-scale attack.

    At 6.30 p.m. Göring’s plans to use the full moon were developing. The attack on London was heavy and the destruction of two bombers by night fighters did little to compensate for the serious and widespread damage inflicted on the city. Train services were stopped at the five main stations. Traffic from others was cut by more than two-thirds. The city’s Underground railway system was severed at five places. Roads were blocked throughout the city and a reservoir, three gasworks, two power stations and three important docks were hit. There were 900 fires in London that night. Over 400 people were killed and more than 800 badly wounded.

    In the day and night operations of Fighter Command 643 sorties were flown against the Luftwaffe, whose units lost fourteen machines—one less than the number lost by the RAF.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 12 | Aircraft: 16

    British Losses
    Airmen: 6 | Aircraft: 15

    Spitfire X4178, No. 41 Squadron
    Sgt. P.D. Lloyd killed. Shot down in a surprise attack by Bf 109 of 4/JG 51.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/LloydPD.htm

    Hurricane N2480, No. 46 Squadron
    P/O P.S. Gunning killed. Shot down in combat with Bf 109s over the Thames Estuary.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Gunning.htm

    Hurricane V6550, No. 46 Squadron
    F/Sgt. E.E. Williams killed. Shot down by Bf 109s over the Thames Estuary.
    http://bbm.org.uk/airmen/WilliamsEE.htm

    Spitfire R6838, No. 92 Squadron
    Sgt. K.B. Parker killed. Shot down in combat with Bf 109s over the Thames Estuary.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/ParkerKB.htm

    Hurricane V6722, No. 501 Squadron
    Sgt. S.A. Fenemore killed. Shot down in combat with Bf 109s over Redhill.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Fenemore.htm

    Hurricane N2546, No. 605 Squadron
    F/Lt. I.J. Muirhead killed. Shot down by Bf 109s over Maidstone.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Muirhead.htm
     
  15. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Wednesday 16 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    16th October 1940

    Quiet.
    Night: Limited attack on London by single aircraft.

    Weather: Fog widespread in Germany and France. Wet and misty night.

    Main Activity:

    Fog kept all but the more confident and competent Luftwaffe pilots on the ground. Those who flew struck out for Kent and the west of England. Seven caught by the RAF, who flew 275 sorties, failed to return. Six were destroyed in accidents. British losses numbered one plane.

    It was not much better during the evening but at least 200 bomber crews chanced the mist and drizzle to raid the British Isles. RAF bombers returning from Italy met with difficulties. Eight Whitleys crashed and a Czech-crewed Wellington came down on the Fight Command headquarters’ tennis court.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 34 | Aircraft: 15

    British Losses
    Airmen: 2 | Aircraft: 3

    Spitfire R6714, No. 65 Squadron
    Sgt. I. Pearson killed. Crashed following flying accident over Gateside.

    Hurricane P3143, No. 310 Squadron
    Sgt. S.J. Chalupa killed. Crashed near Ely during routine training flight. Cause unknown.
    Battle of Britain London Monument - P/O S J Chalupa
     
  16. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Thursday 17 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    17th October 1940

    Fighter-bomber attacks on London and Kent.
    Night: Raids on London, Liverpool and Birmingham.

    Weather: Bright intervals with some showers.

    Main Activity:

    Limited visibility did much to mask the Luftwaffe whose raids started soon after breakfast. Ninety Bf 109s and Bf 110s raided Margate, Broadstairs and Stanmore.

    They were back after lunch and throughout the afternoon appeared in large and small concentrations or in streams, feinting, weaving, splitting up and then rejoining, using cloud to maximum effect, employing every ruse to elude and confuse the defences.

    At one of London’s key arteries, Waterloo Station, a bomb smashed all automatic signalling and signal telephones. Fourteen inexperienced station staff and a handful of soldiers somehow kept trains moving using flags.

    British fighters enjoyed a moderate success. They destroyed five enemy aircraft and lost three of their own in combat. Luftwaffe losses for the day totalled fifteen.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 11 | Aircraft: 16

    British Losses
    Airmen: 5 | Aircraft: 5

    Spitfire R6800, No. 66 Squadron
    P/O H.W. Reilley killed. Shot down by Major Molders of JG 51 in combat over Westerham.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Reilley.htm

    Spitfire P7360, No. 74 Squadron
    F/O A.L. Ricalton killed. Shot down in combat with Bf 109s over Maidstone.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Ricalton.htm

    Hurricane P3174, No. 213 Squadron
    P/O R. Atkinson killed. Shot down in combat with Bf 109s.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/AtkinsonR.htm

    Hurricane V6575, No. 242 Squadron
    P/O N.N. Campbell killed. Presumed damaged by return fire from Do 17 engaged off Yarmouth.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/CampbellNN.htm

    Hurricane V7414, No. 302 Squadron
    Sgt. J.S. Zaluski killed. Overturned attempting forced-landing at Colliers End.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Zaluski.htm
     
  17. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Friday 18 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    18th October 1940
    Relatively quiet.
    Night: Raids on a reduced scale.

    Weather: Fog in Straits of Dover and Thames Estuary. Visibility poor.

    Main Activity:

    After a fairly busy night the morning was unusually quiet. Between lunch and tea thirty-five raids were counted flying high over East Anglia. Forty-five RAF fighter patrols were flown. Some intercepted and shot down four Luftwaffe machines. Total German losses were fifteen. The British lost four.

    It is clear from an address to his aircrews that Göring did not realise what little impression his night bombers were making on British morale. In the past few days and nights [he said] you have caused the British world enemy disastrous losses by your uninterrupted destructive blows. Your indefatigable, courageous attacks on the heart of the British Empire, the City of London, with its eight and a half million inhabitants, have reduced British plutocracy to fear and terror. The losses which you have inflicted on the much-vaunted Royal Air Force in determined fighter engagements are irreplaceable.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 19 | Aircraft: 14

    British Losses
    Airmen: 5 | Aircraft: 6

    Spitfire R6607, No. 152 Squadron
    Sgt. E.E. Shepperd killed. Crashed at Tadnoll Mill near Dorchester during afternoon. Exact circumstances not recorded.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/ShepperdEE.htm

    Hurricane P3872, No. 302 Squadron
    P/O S. Wapniarek killed. Crashed attempting forced landing on Nutwood Farm, Thames Ditton on return from patrol in bad weather conditions.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Wapniarek.htm

    Hurricane V6571, No. 302 Squadron
    P/O A. Zukowski killed. Ran out of fuel having lost bearings in deteriorating weather conditions after routine patrol.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Zukowski.htm

    Hurricane P3931, No. 302 Squadron
    F/O P.E.G. Carter killed. Crashed at Kempton Park Race Course returning from routine patrol in deteriorating weather conditions. Pilot baled out at 50ft.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/CarterPEG.htm

    Hurricane P3930, No. 302 Squadron
    F/O J. Borowski killed. Crashed and burned out at Kempton Park Race Course returning from patrol in deteriorating weather conditions. http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Borowski.htm
     
  18. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Saturday 19 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    19th October 1940

    Isolated patrols and reconnaissance.
    Night: Raids on London, Liverpool, the Midlands and Bristol.

    Weather: Cloudy in Channel, mist in northern France clearing later.

    Main Activity:

    Swirling mists gave the Germans an easy morning but where possible they mounted some patrols. One bomber sent out was brought down over Kent.

    At lunchtime it began to clear and by 2 p.m. fourteen Bf 109s had assembled over the Pas de Calais for a sweep on England. They steered for London unopposed but dropped no bombs. Later, a dog-fight over Beachy Head developed and two British fighters were shot down, bringing Fighter Command’s losses to five for the day. Two Germans failed to return home.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 4 | Aircraft: 6

    British Losses
    Airmen: 2 | Aircraft: 2

    Hurricane P3260, No. 3 Squadron
    F/O G.F. McAvity died of injuries. Crashed attempting slow roll during AA co-operation exercise.

    Spitfire R6922, No. 92 Squadron
    Sgt. L.C. Allton killed. Crashed on Tuesnoad Farm, Smarden. Circumstances unknown.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Allton.htm
     
  19. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Sunday 20 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    20th October 1940
    Fighter-bomber raids on London and the south-east.
    Night: Heavy attacks on London and industrial targets in the Midlands.

    Weather: Mainly cloudy in most districts.

    Main Activity:

    All was quiet until 9.35 a.m. when the first of five Messerschmitt waves were plotted on RDF. In the afternoon high-flying raiders again penetrated inland.

    Squadrons of Fighter Command flew 475 sorties and lost four of their machines. German losses were fourteen aircraft.

    Nearly 300 bombers gave London a bad night. Traffic was dislocated by severe damage to the railways. In Coventry the Armstrong-Siddeley and Singer Motor Works were hit.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 11 | Aircraft: 11

    British Losses
    Airmen: 5 | Aircraft: 5

    Spitfire P7370, No. 74 Squadron
    Sgt. T.B. Kirk died of wounds 22/7/41. Shot down at Coxheath in combat with enemy fighters over Maidstone. Pilot baled out severely wounded and admitted to Preston Hall Hospital in Maidstone.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Kirk.htm

    Blenheim P6952, No. 248 Squadron
    Shot down in attack on enemy aircraft off coast of Norway.
    P/O G.M. Baird captured
    http://bbm.org.uk/airmen/Baird.htm
    Sgt. R. Copcutt missing.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Copcutt.htm
    Sgt. D.L. Burton captured wounded and admitted to hospital in Stavanger.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/BurtonDL.htm
    Sgt. S.V. Wood captured wounded and admitted to hospital in Oslo.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/WoodSV.htm

    Blenheim L9453, No. 248 Squadron
    Shot down by Bf 109s from 4./JG 77 off Ballen Hemnefjord, Norway.
    P/O S.R. Gane killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Gane.htm
    P/O M.D. Green killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/GreenMD.htm
    Sgt. N.J. Stocks killed.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/Stocks.htm
     
  20. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Monday 21 October 1940 | The Battle of Britain Historical Timeline

    Sporadic raids on London, Liverpool and the West Country.
    Night: London, Wolverhampton, Coventry, Birmingham and Liverpool bombed.

    Weather: Mainly cloudy with fog and intermittent rain. Poor visibility.

    Main Activity:

    Taking advantage of the overcast, single aircraft and small formations of bombers despatched by Luftflotten 2 and 3 reached widely separated targets in England.

    Between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. the number of raids increased. About sixty machines flying singly flew in from the Continent and dropped bombs on London and the suburbs. About fifteen were detected going to the West Country.

    The weather clearly put the British at a disadvantage and in the course of the day Fighter Command squadrons flew only 275 sorties. They lost no aircraft whereas six German planes were destroyed. One of these, a Ju 88 which had been posing as a Blenheim and machine-gunning the airfield at Old Sarum, Hampshire, from a height of about fifty feet, was shot down by Flight Lieutenant F. J. Howell and Pilot Officer S. J. Hill:

    Howell dived to decide what it was [says the No. 609 Squadron record book] and even after making sure that it was a Ju 88 with a big cross, was surprised to see the rear gunner signalling with smoke cartridges. Both pilots attacked in turn and after an unusual chase above and below the tree-tops the enemy aircraft hit the ground and blew up near Lymington.

    Excerpt from The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood & Derek Dempster

    German Losses
    Airmen: 10 | Aircraft: 7

    British Losses
    Airmen: 2 | Aircraft: 2

    Hurricane P3657, No. 245 Squadron
    Sgt. E.G. Greenwood missing. Dived into Loch Neagh and exploded. Cause unknown.

    Spitfire X4265, No. 266 Squadron
    P/O W.S. Williams killed. Landed at Stradishall to refuel and crashed on take-off.
    http://www.bbm.org.uk/airmen/WilliamsWS.htm
     

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