Request identification of Japanese tank in photo

Discussion in 'Weapons, Technology & Equipment' started by Jeremiah, Jan 22, 2022.

  1. Jeremiah

    Jeremiah Well-Known Member

    048B2842-859E-4CB6-927E-C2163D33955B.jpeg
     
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  2. Richelieu

    Richelieu Well-Known Member

    Marmon-Herrington CTL-3.
     
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  3. Temujin

    Temujin Member

    Just to confirm, this was NOT a Japanese tank but American made, used by the US Marine Corps and others

    Between 1935 and 1942 the Marmon-Herrington Company built various light tank types based on commercial components, for sale to foreign countries and the U.S. armed forces. It is not very well known that a small number was tested and acquired by the U.S. Marine Corps and also exported to various countries.
    The first models, known as the CTL (Combat Tank, Light) series, were turretless vehicles mounting machine guns in raised superstructures.

    Founded:1931 in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
    Founder:Walter C. Marmon, Arthur W. Herrington
    Products:Axles, transfer cases, military vehicles, tanks, trucks and trolley buses
    Parent:Berkshire Hathaway
     
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  4. Jeremiah

    Jeremiah Well-Known Member

    Okay thanks for the info! I was told it was a Japanese tank for some reason
     
  5. Jeremiah

    Jeremiah Well-Known Member

    .
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2022
  6. Chris C

    Chris C Canadian Patron

    The Japanese captured some from the Dutch, so before being photographed it might have been in use with the Japanese army.
     
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  7. Richelieu

    Richelieu Well-Known Member

    I think that NEI (and Australia courtesy of those diverted during delivery following the NEI collapse) received later models Chris.

    I was trying to think of where a CTL-3 could have seen combat and the answer appears to be that they didn’t! This is the most informative account that I have found: https://www.oocities.org/marmonherrington/usmc.html

    My understanding is that the white star was not adopted as the national symbol until late 1942, so I suspect that as a number of Marmon-Herrington types appear in 1940s war movies, it may literally be Hollywood!
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2022
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  8. Richelieu

    Richelieu Well-Known Member

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