Remembering Today: Battle of Britain 11 July 1940; 90484 Pilot Officer GTM Mitchell

Discussion in 'Remembering Today' started by CL1, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Pilot Officer (Pilot) MITCHELL, GORDON THOMAS MANNERS
    Service Number 90484

    Died 11/07/1940

    609 Sqdn.
    Royal Air Force (Auxiliary Air Force)

    Son of Thomas Robert and Sarah Agnes Mitchell, of Letchworth. B.A. Hons. (Cantab.).
    Buried at WILLIAN (ALL SAINTS) CHURCHYARD

    Location: Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
    Number of casualties: 5

    Cemetery/memorial reference: East of Church.

    upload_2019-7-11_11-45-52.png
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  2. alieneyes

    alieneyes Senior Member

    Battle of Britain London Monument - P/O G T M Mitchell

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  3. Tony56

    Tony56 Member Patron

  4. KevinBattle

    KevinBattle Senior Member

    In following up what else I might find to add to the mix, I noticed this
    Was this a "Blue on Blue" mistake? Seems quite clear that it had red/blue chequered markings "on the wings" so not a Squadron markings insignia - but a Hurricane operated presumably by the Germans??? Surely if a flyable Hurricane had been captured n France, then why paint non German markings? and to be shot down, rather than flown by one of their better pilots? Why waste a captured plane?

    Back on topic:
    Photos exist, with unusual small fuselage roundel "Boozer II" https://i.pinimg.com/originals/7a/71/fb/7a71fbbd487980a760daf2a4e4431ee0.jpg

    History:
    FF 4-9-39 alloc 609S 6-9-39 AMDP RAE 12-6-40 replacement trials aircraft for K9944.
    Fairoaks for medical research trials 20-6-40
    609S FTR ops abandoned over Portland P/O Mitchell missing into sea 11-7-40

    He was shot down in combat by Oberleutnant Ludwig Franzisket of JG27 over a convoy off Portland on 11 July in Spitfire L1095 and reported 'Missing'. His body was eventually washed ashore near Newport, Isle of Wight.

    Of his opponent, Wiki says "Ludwig Franzisket (born 26 June 1917 in Düsseldorf – died 23 November 1988 in Münster) was a German World War II Luftwaffe fighter ace. A flying ace or fighter ace is a military aviator credited with shooting down five or more enemy aircraft during aerial combat. He scored all of his 43 victories against the Western Allies in over 500 combat missions whilst flying the Messerschmitt Bf 109. He was also a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross. After the war, he became a professor and director of the Westfälisches Museum für Naturkunde. World War II in Europe began on Friday, 1 September 1939, when German forces invaded Poland. On 11 May 1940, Franzisket claimed his first two victories, ending the French campaign with nine kills. On 9 July 1./JG 1 was redesignated 7./JG 27. "

    Thomas Manners is a well known name connected to the Dukes of Rutland - coincidence or connection?
     
  5. Gage

    Gage The Battle of Barking Creek MOD

    In the early morning of the 11th July, 1940 P/O G.T.M Mitchell was on patrol with his flight when enemy aircraft were sighted. His leader ordered them to get into position, and he was last seen going into attack.
    Immediately after the combat it was realised that P/O Mitchell was missing, a launch was dispatched. A very thorough search was made but without success.
    On 21st July, 1940, notification was received from the Yarmouth Police that the body of P/O Mitchell had been found on the beach near Brook, Isle of Wight.

    Taken from Battle of Britain Combat Archive.
     
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  6. travers1940

    travers1940 Active Member

    Thomas Manners is a well known name connected to the Dukes of Rutland - coincidence or connection?

    Coincidence I think, His mother maiden name was Manners. Three trees on ancestry show her descent (I know not always reliable) & one shows descent back to Thomas Manners baptised 1654 in Oxfordshire.

    The two present day Manners heriditary peerages, Duke of Rutland (cr 1703) & Baron Manners (cr 1807) have their roots with Sir Thomas Manners KG (d 1543) 1st earl of Rutland, and the family houses and estates are at Haddon hall, Derbyshire & Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire
     

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