Rememberance Day 2006

Discussion in 'All Anniversaries' started by Wise1, Nov 12, 2006.

  1. Dawes

    Dawes Junior Member

    Those who live in our memories never die.

    I remember, every day. Not just on 11 November.
     
  2. susanhemmings

    susanhemmings Junior Member

    Remembering all those that gave their lives, freedom and youth to enable us to live as we do today.
     
  3. Sue Goddard

    Sue Goddard Junior Member

    In memory of my maternal Grandfather, William John TRACE born in Tredegar, South Wales in 1898 and served in:
    Corps: South Wales Borderers
    Regiment No: 20132
    Rank: Private
    Corps: 4th Lancs Fusiliers
    Regiment No: 51405
    Rank: Private
    Corps: 3rd Monmouthshire Regiment
    Regiment No: 4070678
    Rank: Lance Corporal
    Corps: RASC
    Regiment No: T390422
    Rank: Lance Corporal

    He was only 15 years of age when he joined up and served in France and Palestine between 1914 and 1919. He was one of the lucky ones who survived albeit with horrific memories.

    Also in memory of my paternal Great Uncle Daniel Thomas COLLAR[D] born in 189O in Ebbw Vale, South Wales. He served in:
    Corps: Royal Army Medical Corps
    Regiment No: 88498
    Rank: Corporal
    He went into the RAMC in 1914 and went out to Germany on a peace mission that year. He spent up to 1917 travelling around Great Britain and went abroad in 1917. He was blown up in no mans land, in Zillebeke and died on the 26th July 1917. He was buried at SP.MEM.H.29 Railway Dugouts Burial Ground, Zillebeke, Ieper, West-Velaanderen.

    I would also like to remember my husband's uncle, David Tawelfryn Male also from Ebbw Vale who died on the 29th April 1942 in bombing raid in Bievres, Paris, France. Sgt1258385 a 2nd Pilot of a Wellington MKIII Bomber X3593 KO-C of 115 Sqn RAFVR. Target ref:T/O2118 Gennevilliers A/C. They crashed at Bievres (Seine et Oise) 12Kms South East Versailles France.

    We remember the three of them and those who served with them, today and always.

    Sue
     
  4. macgregordespite

    macgregordespite Junior Member

    My father survived WW2 after serving on HMS Onslow on the 'Russian Run'. Capt Sherbrooke received the VC for her part in the Battle of the Barents Sea. Sadly my father died in 1976 but today I put flowers on his grave (the sea). I watched the Rememberance Day Parade and saw those that remain of the Russian Convoy Association and I felt immense pride that my father had been part of that. Whether we agree with war or not we should never forget the sacrifice and contribution by the 'Great Generation'.
     
  5. Spice

    Spice Junior Member

    In Loving memory of members of my family who fought in both wars:

    WW1

    My great-grandfather, Lance Corpral James Gibson, 14445, 11th Bn Border Reg, kia, France, 4th July 1917

    My great- uncle, Pte Joseph Lewis, P/7059, 20th Bn Royal Fusiliers, attd 180th coy, Royal Engineers, kia, France, 22nd June 1916

    My Grandfather's cousin, Pte Arnold Ward, South Lancashire PWV, kia, France, 16th May 1918

    My Grandfather's cousin, Lance Corpral George Ashworth, PLY/12488 (RMR/B/759), S.S. Tatarrax, 10th August 1918


    WW2

    My Grandfather, Pte Arnold Lewis, 3459802, 9th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers, Died 10th June 1996

    My Great-Uncle, Pte George W. Gibson, 3597746, 2nd Bn, Border Reg, died 7th July 1952, Greenside Lead Mine Disaster, whilst attempting to save a workmates life



    And for all who sacrificed their lives that we may be here today, thank you.

    [​IMG]
    Lest We Forget...
     
  6. Kitty

    Kitty Very Senior Member

    Thank you to all those who have fought and continues to do so. And especially for the four men killed in Basra today.

    The Mother

    If you should die, think only this of me
    In that still quietness where is space for thought,
    Where parting, loss and bloodshed shall not be,
    And men may rest themselves and dream of nought:
    That in some place a mystic mile away
    One whom you loved has drained the bitter cup
    Till there is nought to drink; has faced the day
    Once more, and now, has raised the standard up.

    And think, my son, with eyes grown clear and dry
    She lives as though for ever in your sight,
    Loving the things you loved, with heart aglow
    For country, honour, truth, traditions high,
    - Proud that you paid their price. (And if some night
    Her heart should break - well, lad, you will not know.)

    May Herschel-Clarke
     
  7. ourbill

    ourbill Senior Member

    In memory of William Owen 5055100, Trooper 51st Royal Tank Regiment.
    Survived WW2 but wished to forget.
    'How small men look when they are lying dead'
     
  8. yellowrosebuds

    yellowrosebuds Junior Member

    My Uncle served in WWll and was killed in France in August of 1944 at the age of 22.
    I was not borned at the time, but have heard of how he was killed, but I would like to know more. I have been doing a lot of research but have came to a dead end. As I have found out that some or all the records of the military had gotten destoryed in a fire or at least that is what I have ran into when searching for info. I would like to know more about who he was a military man. Who he served with and well the common question a proud niece would want to know about her Uncle.
    His name was Prvt. 1st Class Ralph M. Correll. He died in France in a Town that started with and "L" not sure. So if there is anyone out there that knew or could tell me more about my uncle I would really appriciate it.
    Alos, I would like to take this time to Say THANK YOU to all who have served and who are serving for giving me an my family and the rest of the USA people our freedom. You will never be forgotten. You are in my thoughts and prayers everyday, and will be until they all come home. thank:salut: :salut: :patriot[1]: :patriot[1]: :thankyousign::thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign:
     
  9. djcrtoye

    djcrtoye Member

    Sorry, meant to complete dedication hit wrong key. Guardsman James Anderson 13873 C Coy 1st Bn Scots Guards killed in action 30th March 1916 and to the men who died on the same day all buried together in Belguuim.

    We never knew him
    But we will remember him
     
  10. St. Ives

    St. Ives Member

    I would like to say a few words in appreciation for those who gave their lives so that we could experience the freedoms we have.

    My own grandfather [on my mum's side] was fortunate to have survived the WW1 but he saw many of his friends killed in action in the trenches. The memory of these brave men must never be forgotten.
     
  11. D Freeman

    D Freeman Junior Member

    This thread is for members to post their own comments in honour of those who fell in the wars and as we not only remember the sacrifices but also celebrate their achievements.

    Please take a minute or so to make your mark that will remain for others to read in the future.
    I remember the second world war my father joined up september 1939
    so i never shared my childhood with him i lived on a large council house
    estate and one by one the fathers were called up a few never to return
    i some times walk round there and still remember the ones that never came back i was lucky mine did so i remember my freinds who lost there dads and remeberence day brings it back.D Freeman
     
  12. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Just a few Cemeteries we've been to this year.Mainly Great War,a few WW2 ones and The Battle of Britain Memorial.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. bosco

    bosco Junior Member

    My Uncle served in WWll and was killed in France in August of 1944 at the age of 22.
    I was not borned at the time, but have heard of how he was killed, but I would like to know more. I have been doing a lot of research but have came to a dead end. As I have found out that some or all the records of the military had gotten destoryed in a fire or at least that is what I have ran into when searching for info. I would like to know more about who he was a military man. Who he served with and well the common question a proud niece would want to know about her Uncle.
    His name was Prvt. 1st Class Ralph M. Correll. He died in France in a Town that started with and "L" not sure. So if there is anyone out there that knew or could tell me more about my uncle I would really appriciate it.
    Alos, I would like to take this time to Say THANK YOU to all who have served and who are serving for giving me an my family and the rest of the USA people our freedom. You will never be forgotten. You are in my thoughts and prayers everyday, and will be until they all come home. thank:salut: :salut: :patriot[1]: :patriot[1]: :thankyousign::thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign: :thankyousign:
    I also lost my uncle, age 19 in a town in France that starts with a "L".
    I also was born after his death. My Mom remembers him daily.
    Some wounds never heal.
     
  14. Cpl Rootes

    Cpl Rootes Senior Member

    Just something to think about..

    If you held a minutes slilence for every Gurkha killed in WW2, you would be silent for 2 WEEKS!!
     
  15. kiwimac

    kiwimac Member

    My Father in WW2 & Grandfathers in WW1.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Cpl Rootes

    Cpl Rootes Senior Member

    Old Harry was a veteran of the Second World War
    Medals adourned his chest, testimony to the action he saw
    Fearless in battle, his bravery was matchless
    His heroics often mentioned, in company dispatches

    Hostilities over, Harry's like were needed no more
    Hearded onto troopships and repatriated to the British shore
    Picking up his trade, as though he'd never been away
    Harry settled back into "civvy" street and proceeded to pick up his weekly pay

    Harry fought valiantly for this land, so future generations would be free
    Little did Harry and his like realise, how these generations would turn out to be
    Feeling lonely and imprisoned, in his little two up and two down
    Scared to leave his prison, once the sun had settled down

    Heckled and jeered, by teenage louts who really dont deserve a mention
    When he went to collect the gratitude, the country called, a state pension
    These six foot waste of spaces, wouldnt have heckled Harry in his prime
    Yet he surrended his teenage years, fighting for them on the front line

    His home was constantly bombarded, by those who saw him as easy prey
    Until they went too far, on that never to be forgotten day
    Enough is enough, Harry at breaking point, was heard to roar
    After a stone through his window, landed on the living room floor

    Up in the attic, the old campaigner resolutely sped
    Years of anger and torment, had drove all rational thoughts from Harry's head
    He took his service revolver, checked every cylinder had a shell
    A sense of calm came over Harry, as he decided to send his tormentors to hell

    Front door flung open, revolver by his side
    The louts just laughed at Harry, that day six from eight died
    A police marksman was deployed, and after many warnings given
    Harry pointed his empty revolver, why, he thought, should he go on living.

    Lest We Forget Too Much Too Late

    BY: Mr John Evans
     
  17. James Harvey

    James Harvey Senior Member

    In memory of Jesse Creek KIA 1918 my great great uncle.

    In Memory of my Grandad C F Harvey RN Boom Defence died 1989 he never talked about the war.

    My Grandfathers Brothers and sisters who were all in uniform during ww2.

    I have another Great Grandfather who was Lt Cmdr RN in WW1 just trying to find his name.

    And My Nan G I Harvey WAAF Ballon operator, who has only just started talking about the war.

    I'll never forget

    James
     
  18. Celtic75(Cdn Allies)

    Celtic75(Cdn Allies) Junior Member

    I would like to honour my grandfather who served in the royal lancs and machine gun corps during the first world war.Also my great uncle KIA while serving in the RAF during the second world war.And my other great uncle who spent 3 years as a POW,My great grandfather who fought in th Boer war and to the rest of my family for their suffering and sacrifice during those times.


    [​IMG]
     
  19. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER

    Just something to think about..

    If you held a minutes slilence for every Gurkha killed in WW2, you would be silent for 2 WEEKS!!

    Puts it into some sort of context, doesnt it?
     
  20. sapper_k9

    sapper_k9 Junior Member

    I remember, remember too much, I was born in a Nazi camp.

    I remember my father and his so called life after interrogation by the Gestapo, my mother told me I never knew my dad - I did not know him before the Gestapo had him.

    I remember my father-in-law, Ernie Taylor, 2/16th Bn 2nd AIF, wounded on the Kokoda track, 17 major surgeries and two years later he could drink from a cup.

    I remember my granddad telling me of seeing his daughter's legs protruding from the rubble of their Blitzed house in London - he pulled and all he got were the legs.

    I remember my mates, especially my Sapper Mates, in Vietnam - and the many whom have since suicided.

    I remember the spirit of ANZAC, and the Pup Bn revolt where the Diggers sacked their officers...

    Perhaps I have too much to remember?

    Canon fodder of Empire...

    A Sapper
     

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