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Red Cross vs. Salvation Army

Discussion in 'General' started by Ronglimeng, Dec 1, 2010.

  1. Ronglimeng

    Ronglimeng Junior Member

    I recently re-read "Goodbye Darkness", William Manchester's book about the war in the Pacific and particularly his own service as a US Marine. It seemed that when he was severely wounded and evacuated to Hawaii, he developed some strong opinions comparing the Red Cross to the Salvation Army. In his case the first organisation tried to sell cigarettes to him in hospital, while the second organisation just gave them to him.

    It was very similar to what my mother said my dad (5 CAD, Italy, Holland) felt about the two organisations giving comfort to soldiers. He also had a better feeling about the Sally Ann...something about getting dry socks from them, I think.

    Any comment or opinions comparing these two organisations?
     
  2. spider

    spider Very Senior Member

    THE SALVATION ARMY IN A FORWARD AREA OF THE OWEN STANLEY RANGES. THIS VERY WELCOME TENT, NEAR UBERI, WITH ITS WELCOME CUP OF COFFEE AND BISCUITS, WAS A GREAT BOON TO TROOPS SICK OR WOUNDED, GOING BACK FROM THE FRONT.

    http://cas.awm.gov.au/screen_img/027002

    The Sally-Man was not far behind the fighting in New Guinea and the SW Pacific.

    "Everymans" was also active providing comforts to the servicemen in Australia.

    Both are still active today supporting the ADF in Australia and on overseas operations....and rely on donations to provide their services.
     
  3. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Old Hickory Recon

    My grandfather had a less than endearing opinion of the Red Cross. During the occupation of Japan, he was billeted in a hangar, sleeping on a cot and it was rather cold. He asked for a blanket to go between him and the cot from both the army and the RC and was turned down by both. The Salvation Army gave him not one, but two. He said the RC offered him coffee at train stop, but he had to pay for it. Later on the Salvation Army was at another stop, giving it away.

    Old Hickory, my friend I talk to regularly, speaks in similar tones about both organizations. He said the SA was on the dock when he left Boston and when he arrived in Liverpool, handing out coffee and other necessary items, such as a sewing kit in Boston.
     
  4. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER

    You can't beat the Salvo's.

    I remember riding past one of their bands and throwing an apple down one of their instruments.

    I was only about 12 - Shame on me!
     
  5. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Old Hickory Recon

    You can't beat the Salvo's.

    I remember riding past one of their bands and throwing an apple down one of their instruments.

    I was only about 12 - Shame on me!

    I have to agree with you Geoff, shame on you. But, I have things in my past that are not to be proud of.
     
  6. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    According to the Salvation Army, Commissioners W. Todd Bassett and his wife Carol A. Bassett jointly received basic living allowances and grants totaling $64,210 for 2004 plus housing valued at $34,116. That is still considerably less than the salaries of some of the other top charities.

    Marsha J. Evans, the president of the American Red Cross, was paid $651,957 in 2004. The president of the United Way is now Ralph Dickerson Jr. who's current salary is $420,000 per year, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy.
     
  7. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

  8. ADM199

    ADM199 Well-Known Member

    There has been a very interesting account written of one Salvationists activities in the Desert and later as a POW.

    The book is "Prisoner Of War The Gospel according to Fred". Written by Fred Hill who as a 19yr old drove his comforts van close enough to the action to get fired on by a German Tank.

    Met Major Fred Hill myself a few years ago at a St. 1VB Reunion and had an interesting conversation about his experiences.
     
  9. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER

    According to the Salvation Army, Commissioners W. Todd Bassett and his wife Carol A. Bassett jointly received basic living allowances and grants totaling $64,210 for 2004 plus housing valued at $34,116. That is still considerably less than the salaries of some of the other top charities.

    Marsha J. Evans, the president of the American Red Cross, was paid $651,957 in 2004. The president of the United Way is now Ralph Dickerson Jr. who's current salary is $420,000 per year, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

    Poor Marsha & Ralph, how do they exist?
     
  10. sapper

    sapper WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Sally Ann.... For sure and a dead certainty.. Great people, never forgot their kindness, never ever pass a collection box.... EVER.

    That is I think a fair representation of the great majority of service folks opinion.
    Sapper
     
  11. wtid45

    wtid45 Very Senior Member

    Intresting thread and it will make me think twice about them next time a Sally band strikes up at Christmas.Also got me looking for ww2 related matters and the Salvation Army and I found this. Catford, Salvation Army Corps WW2 War Memorial, Catford - Lewisham War Memorials Anyone know more, is of intrest as my Mum lived throught the war in Lewisham and my Great Aunt Freda and other relatives lived in Catford.
     
  12. Jedburgh22

    Jedburgh22 Very Senior Member

    Salvation Army - they do so much good with so little - so many 'big' charities are it seems to me big business with salaries to match and so much of their income goes on 'overheads' I always feel angry when approached in the street by bright young folk getting paid a lot for each direct debit they set up - I read somehwere it takes the charity up to two years to break even on their fees - sure that it is a training ground for tomorrows bankers!
     
  13. spider

    spider Very Senior Member

    A wounded Australian soldier has his cigarette lit by Salvation Army Chaplain Albert Moore, padre to the 2/14th battalion. The soldier on the stretcher is VX51106 Lieutenant Valentine G. Gardner, D Company, 2/14th Battalion. An unidentified soldier on the left having a drink has a bandaged head and is carrying a staff. A Papuan stretcher bearer (popularly known as a Fuzzy Wuzzy Angel) is behind the stretcher.

    http://cas.awm.gov.au/screen_img/013287
     
  14. spider

    spider Very Senior Member

  15. Cobber

    Cobber Senior Member

    My old dad (Korea 52/53 and 53/54) always said that when you see a Salvo with a donation tin to kick in as much money as possible.
    As shown above they were very close to the combat during the Kokoda Track campaign and all other Aussie campaigns and other wars.
    Not to forget the numerous other national branches which did the same for their national troops. The Salvo's being any where in the world they felt they could help and do good for the fighting men.
    In the land of Aus they are very big organisation who get quite a lot of money from the State and Federal Govts yet they continually have so much work with many people in many differing ways they allways need donations.
     
  16. jainso31

    jainso31 jainso31

    SA v RC-no contest-SA. KOs RC. every time.-SA for being up front,being kind ,compassionate and completely human-they win hands down.

    jainso31
     
  17. spider

    spider Very Senior Member

    http://cas.awm.gov.au/thumb_img/P02328.004

    Rabaul, New Guinea, 1941-04-25. The band of the 2/22nd Battalion, with the battalion formed up behind, about to move off during the Anzac Day Service. The 2/22nd Battalion Band was unique, as the twenty four members of the band were all originally Salvation Army bandsmen, they enlisted as a complete band under their Bandmaster, Arthur Gullidge, and were assigned to the 2/22nd Battalion. The 2/22nd Battalion was sent to garrison Rabaul as the infantry unit in Lark Force, arriving in New Britain in March and April 1941. The 2/22nd Battalion suffered 571 men killed during the New Britain campaign, or as prisoners of war. Most were killed when the Montevideo Maru, carrying 1050 prisoners of war and civilians from Rabaul was sunk off Luzon, in the South China Sea, by the United States submarine USS Sturgeon on 1942-07-01. Others were also executed by the Japanese at Tol. Of the twenty four men who enlisted in the band, only one survived the 1942 New Britain campaign.
     
  18. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter Patron 1940 Obsessive

    I've never heard an old soldier say anything bad about the Sally Ann. Always first up at the sharp end with a tea wagon.

    That said, the work done by the Red Cross with POWs could only have been done by a large international organisation.
     

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