Post Traumatic Stress

Discussion in 'Veteran Accounts' started by Trincomalee, Oct 3, 2007.

  1. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    You can park on single and double yellow lines and car parks where it states on a sign that a disabled badge holder can park for free. These are in the main council run sites and hospital car paks and not private ones.

    If you get a ticket all you need to do is send them a covering letter with a copy of your badge and they ignore the ticket. If people are ignoring parking restrictions I suggest you should contact your local Safer Neighbourhood Team and get the PCSO's out as that is exactly what they are paid to do by tax payers.

    We have had two parking tickets in the last 18 mths that were not persued by the council after sending in a copy of our badge. We have used it all over the country and on numerous ocassions in Belgium and France at Dunkirk and Paris to name two cities.

    I'm still not sure where you get the 70% of badge holders are fraudulent from though.

    Regards
    Andy
     
  2. Capt Bill

    Capt Bill wanderin off at a tangent

    Anyone that has seen action will find it adverse.... I was wounded in two occasions. Both, blown up at close quarters. Violent in the extreme. I have had men killed around me and seen death in all ts guises. I never suffered PTS. Never
    sapper

    you are a very fortunate person Sapper

    I have been on tour several times, seen some terrible sights

    I have cared for many - some highly decorated individuals - and the persistent revisiting, triggering, nightmares etc is very real
     
    dbf likes this.
  3. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    If the bloke in that Famous Don McCullin shot from Hue hasn't been 'changed' in some way by what he's just done, then I'll eat my hat.
    That's not a face that's going to be fixed by a hot drink and a good nights sleep, is it?
    Anyone know any more on the man pictured?

    [​IMG]
     
  4. sapper

    sapper WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    The information came from an enquiry to both Hampshire and Dorset County Councils. The questions were asked in support of the disabled.

    The prime mover in the change of the law was BLESMA. If you are in any doubt about the fraudulent use of the Blue Badge? then keep an eye out for yourself...

    You will see folk get out, put the badge up and set off with no trouble at all. It is a complete mockery. The penalty is paid by the genuine disabled. because the badge worth is devalued because of the huge incidence of Fraud,
    Sapper.
    PS I have been told that blue badge is worth £500 quid in london
     
  5. sapper

    sapper WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Capt Bill. We had two battle exhaustion cases. I went through the Blitz in Southampton dragging out dead and wounded women and children, and In Normandy, in continuous action (unless they ran faster than we could catch them) PTS was not a problem.... FEAR Oh Yes, there was plenty of that. But there were tens of thousands in action that never suffered PTS. That was also the opinion of our local NVA branch. Many that thought it was something new.
    Sapper
     
  6. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran Patron

    Brian is, perhaps more than anyone else on this forum, qualified to write about PTS but I would like to add a few points based on my own limited experience.

    During The Great War & later on in WW2 there would have been clearcut distinctions between what would have been classed as "battle fatigue" and "shell shock".

    Battle fatigue, as it's name implied, described the gradual wearing down physically and mentally of a persons ability to cope.

    Shell-shock was rather intended to describe the physical result of being affected by blast from an explosion or from being subjected to a barrage of shell-fire.

    During my spell at Cassino and my later short stay in hospital at Naples (the result of nothing more than a dose of impetigo) I saw quite a few examples of both types of injuries and yes, I do consider them both injuries.

    I belive that a large part of Brian's impatience with the use of the phrase PTS is that we, as your every day servicemen, involved in fighting a long and energy sapping war were never offered, given or even expected to receive counselling for our every day efforts.

    Or Brian, have I got it all wrong ?

    Best regards

    Ron
     
  7. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    posted too much info
     
  8. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    I was going to say this earlier, wish I had now.
    Maybe take detailed discussion of Parking permits elsewhere chaps, bit of a distraction from this deathly serious subject. One for the barracks perhaps. ~A
     
  9. sapper

    sapper WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Ron put it a nutshell as usual. Thanks mate. Two things. One I have all the sympathy in the world for any one that is disabled. having had to deal with what is termed as; "Exceptional severe injuries" by the war pensions folk.

    Two, As to changing The ladies disability for mine,,, I can assure you that the lady would soon change her mind. I would not wish what I have to put up with on my worst enemy.... But having suffered the pain and discomfort for 66 years, I am used to it, and live with it...What is more, I make the very best of "what is possible"

    I enjoy life to the full within the circle of travel that contains all disabled folk.;
    Sapper
     
  10. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    If the bloke in that Famous Don McCullin shot from Hue hasn't been 'changed' in some way by what he's just done, then I'll eat my hat.
    That's not a face that's going to be fixed by a hot drink and a good nights sleep, is it?
    Anyone know any more on the man pictured?

    [​IMG]

    This sums the shot up quite well for me:

    Often referred to as the ‘Shell-shocked Soldier’, it was taken During the Tet offensive in 1968.

    The first thing that draws you in is the face. The mud stained face and impassive stare through shadowed vacant eyes. His dirty pale hands clutched tightly around the barrel of his gun and his hunched shoulders create a sense of tension and unease. The gun is almost like a safety item. Something the marine can hold on to for assurance, protection and security. It reminds me of a child that always carries the one blanket or toy around for comfort. The way the image is cropped, either when taken or printed, gives the impression that the marine is ‘squashed’ into the frame. He has the glazed eyes of someone who has seen too much in too short a time, and the way his face and body is set makes him seem incapacitated unable to move or help.

    Taken from RAGE Pictures

    I am now rather intrigued to who he is and if he survived the war. It reminds me of that WW1 film footage of the British Soldier carrying that wounded/dead chap on his back through the trenches, the eyes can give so much away can't they?
     
  11. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Another interesting view on that picture?

    He is often described as shell-shocked, but I don't think he is. To be shell-shocked is to be incapacitated, and this Marine appears anything but. The set of his mouth and jaw, the slightly forward thrust of his shoulders, and the taut grip on his weapon suggest a man waiting to go into battle. His eyes don't suggest, they tell us he's been there before, more than once, and that he knows exactly what's waiting for him. He is without a shred of illusion, and his only hope is to get through the next five minutes, maybe the next thirty seconds. That's his idea of a future; and if he survives and lives to a very advanced age, he'll never be older than he is now.


    The VVA Veteran

    I think our cousins across the pond may hold the answer.
     
  12. spider

    spider Very Senior Member

  13. Fireman

    Fireman Discharged

    SAPPER:
    You are swimming against the tide. Todays society is the 'softest' I can ever recall. Compensation is the norm and sympathy by the bucketload has to be given or you are some sort of unfeeling monster. I suspect that it is only the respect that posters on this forum have for you that you ar not insulted quite badly. Had I said what you have, and I agree with every word, I suspect the wrath of God would have descended upon me. I think a great many more people agree with you than you possibly believe. I will now take to my bunker and await the cessation of hostilities.
     
  14. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    SAPPER:
    You are swimming against the tide. Todays society is the 'softest' I can ever recall. Compensation is the norm and sympathy by the bucketload has to be given or you are some sort of unfeeling monster. I suspect that it is only the respect that posters on this forum have for you that you ar not insulted quite badly. Had I said what you have, and I agree with every word, I suspect the wrath of God would have descended upon me. I think a great many more people agree with you than you possibly believe. I will now take to my bunker and await the cessation of hostilities.

    Fireman
    What specifically are you saying about PTSD here? I don't see a reference to it.
     
  15. sapper

    sapper WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Plenty of time for the wrath to descend Fireman. On thee and me !
    Again, without wishing to offend anyone. I sometimes wonder how some of our contributors would fare, having to build a light assault bridge under heavy withering fire..... Or to lead off an assault with the happy knowledge you are first.... the enemy is waiting.....So if anyone is in any doubt, let me say this. That sort of determination needs to be pretty strong...So why be surprised if you come across the same determination from the same men. NOW?

    It is honestly the opinion of the majority of the local Normandy Veterans, that PTS is overdone....I do not think anyone should be surprised by that...After all some folk use anything for gain.That PTS exists, there is no doubt, and I extend my best wishes to those that suffer...But some of the causes put forward in the press were downright daft.

    The "Hire a cripple" is real and not a figment of a fevered imagination
    Sapper
     
  16. sapper

    sapper WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    No ham meant Oh Dear! Oh Dear!
     
  17. Formerjughead

    Formerjughead Senior Member

    It is honestly the opinion of the majority of the local Normandy Veterans, that PTS is overdone....I do not think anyone should be surprised by that...After all some folk use anything for gain.That PTS exists, there is no doubt, and I extend my best wishes to those that suffer...But some of the causes put forward in the press were downright daft.

    The "Hire a cripple" is real and not a figment of a fevered imagination
    Sapper

    I agree 100%......it is an area that could be, and is, easily abused. The absurdity is that it is either over diagnosed or under recognized. The other sad factor is that just as the various Elite forces fall victim to imposters so does PTSD.
     
  18. Capt Bill

    Capt Bill wanderin off at a tangent

    It is honestly the opinion of the majority of the local Normandy Veterans, that PTS is overdone....I do not think anyone should be surprised by that...After all some folk use anything for gain.That PTS exists, there is no doubt, and I extend my best wishes to those that suffer...But some of the causes put forward in the press were downright daft.

    Sapper

    Yes , I agree with you on this.

    I know PTSD exists - but the real sufferers are the one who never come forward, or come forward after a lot of internal struggle and realisation. I have nursed many sufferers who have been involved in conflicts from WW2 to present actions.

    There are quite a few 'bull sh 1 t' merchants who have jumped on the bandwagon. You cannot xray for it, or take a blood sample to prove its existance. I have referred soldiers to the Psychs, and the Psychs have confirmed my thoughts in that they where just 'lead swingers' looking for compensation or a quick exit from service life.

    I have the greatest of respect and sympathy for true sufferers of PTSD - some of my friends are included in its number. I have little is any patience for bandwagoners
     
  19. Fireman

    Fireman Discharged

    DBF:
    Sorry If I didn't make myself clear, I was simply agreeing with Sapper. Specifically I believe that PTS is in some cases used as an excuse to avoid further involvement in stress situations. I believe it is also used to attempt to extract compensation. I further believe that those who seek to gain from a false PTS claim are harming the case of those who are real sufferers. I also believe that the society of today is too willing to provide a shoulder to cry on and this exacerbates the problem of people willing to make false claims of PTS. lots of 'believes' there but I have tried to be precise.
     
  20. Lofty1

    Lofty1 Senior Member

    Hi, just to chuck into the debate this, hanging in our sunday club caravan is a sign I retrieved from a pile of junk in a friends yard just before he moved to Greece. he was a medic, it was a momento he hung on to after the Gulf war (I think) its a stecil sign on plywood F. P. U. with a palm tree underneath. F.P.U. ---- Field Phyciatric Unit. he told me this was the first time such a team had been used in a war zone, advertise the symtoms and someone will get the complaint, conversly my wifes grandfather, was brought back from the front 1915 to Rouen, no 8 military hospital Boisgullame, with severe shell shock, having lost the will to live he fought off two orderlies threw himself out of an top floor window to his death, married 3 kids, God forbid we will never encounter whatever it was that caused that. regards lofty
     

Share This Page