Panzer Regiment 3

Discussion in 'Axis Units' started by Drew5233, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Can anyone enlighten me to what a 'Hedgehog formation' is ?

    Panzers in Normandy
    Adopting hedgehog formation, they managed to knock out twenty-five American tanks and, cut of from the rest of the division except for radio contact, fought on throughout July 30 to August 1;

    Cheers
    Andy
     
  2. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    A schiltron or circular formation has often been called Hedgehog.
    Spikes in all directions.

    Dim memory suggests an 'official' Panzer approach to forming circle was several rings staggered out along a line, but I'd need to check that.

    This might help:
    Chapter Two: The Defensive
     
  3. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Thanks Adam,

    I'm guessing I would be right in thinking its a bit like the old British 'Diamond' formation but rounded off at the edges?

    Cheers
    Andy
     
  4. Verrieres

    Verrieres no longer a member

    The Hedgehog position I believe was used by a halted panzer unit to defend itself, it would curl up into a defensive laager called a hedgehog, These hedgehogs provided all-around security for the stationary panzers and were used for night defensive positions as well as for resupply halts During their advance through a swampy forest region in Lithuania where strong, dispersed enemy forces were reassembling, combat teams of 6th Panzer Division formed their first hedgehog positions during the initial week of the Russian campaign. Several hay barns in a major clearing were selected as the location for the divisional command post. Covered by thick underbrush, the tanks were placed in a wide circle around the barns with their guns ready to fire at the edge of the woods. In front of the tanks was an outer ring of infantry in foxholes and ditches and behind embankments which enabled the tanks to fire over their heads. Security patrols and outposts formed an outer cordon.
    Regards
    Verrieres
     
  5. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Verrieres

    Most Tank units in Laager would adopt the hedgehog position for defence with the soft vehicles of the supply echelons in the centre - and Infantry to the front - as you point out - all ready to withstand counter attack - refuel - eat and sleep -

    the term Laager came from the attitude of the Boers in the South African wars - and was adopted by the British...and others

    Cheers
     
  6. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Many thanks all :)
     
  7. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    The Hedgehog position I believe was used by a halted panzer unit to defend itself, it would curl up into a defensive laager called a hedgehog, These hedgehogs provided all-around security for the stationary panzers and were used for night defensive positions as well as for resupply halts During their advance through a swampy forest region in Lithuania where strong, dispersed enemy forces were reassembling, combat teams of 6th Panzer Division formed their first hedgehog positions during the initial week of the Russian campaign. Several hay barns in a major clearing were selected as the location for the divisional command post. Covered by thick underbrush, the tanks were placed in a wide circle around the barns with their guns ready to fire at the edge of the woods. In front of the tanks was an outer ring of infantry in foxholes and ditches and behind embankments which enabled the tanks to fire over their heads. Security patrols and outposts formed an outer cordon.
    Regards
    Verrieres

    I found the same info on this website.
    Chapter Two: The Defensive

    Please, can you link to where you found the info either from a website or book.
     
  8. Verrieres

    Verrieres no longer a member

    I found the same info on this website.
    Chapter Two: The Defensive

    Please, can you link to where you found the info either from a website or book.


    Hi,
    Similar information but not as detailed,:Dit did`nt come from there it came from http://www.theenemywithin/ which I am afraid is either dead or moved thats why I did`nt post it in the first place.Still I agree credit where credits due.Other references are
    Berlin: A Huge Hedgehog

    by Hans-Ulrich Arntz but this does not describe a panzer hedgehog more the actual defence of Berlin based on the same principle.
    Hans-Ulrich Arntz, "Berlin, ein Riesenigel," Das Reich, 18 March 1945
    Berlin — A Huge Hedgehog
    General description and explaination
    Hedgehog defence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Regards
    Verrieres
     
  9. Tom Canning

    Tom Canning WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Owen -
    sorry but I can't reference any book for the "hegehog" information - just common knowledge for Tank crews probably from a lecture by RSM Twyler ( Horse Guards) of the 61st Training reget. at Barnard Castle 1942/43.

    Cheers
     

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