Not sure if I'm in right place! 7350044 James Henry Smith 2 Field Regiment, RA

Discussion in 'Royal Artillery' started by Gonegirl, Feb 25, 2019.

  1. Tullybrone

    Tullybrone Senior Member

    Hi,

    Just for completeness here is a quote about the Army Reserve - from WW1 info site Long Long Trail - but same would apply in the “between the wars” years (albeit the pay may have been more than in 1914).

    1. Army Reserve
    This was a pool of men who had already completed a term of service with the regular army. It was organised into three Sections:

    Section A Reserve
    For men who had completed their service in the regular army and who undertook to rejoin, if required, in an emergency that did not require general mobilisation. A man could serve no more than two years in Section A. Pay was 7 shillings a week in addition to the reservists earnings as a civilian. He had to attend twelve training days per year.

    Section B Reserve
    The most common form of army reserve service. For men who had completed their service in the regular army and were serving their normal period (typically of five years) on reserve. Section B reservists could only be called upon in the event of general mobilisation. Pay was 3 shillings and 6 pence a week.

    Section D Reserve
    For men who had completed their time in Section B Reserve. They could choose to extend for another four years and were placed in Section D Reserve. terms, pay and training was the same as Section B.

    I forgot to add that what you say about Army Enlistment being preferable to working “down the pit” in the 1920’s and 30’s is a common reason for young men jaof that generation oining the army.

    In addition to the harsh working conditions miners might only be working 3 or 4 shifts a fortnight - in addition to the regular strikes and owner lock outs. My father went down the pit in 1932 at 14 years of age as a “pony lad” and he too left to join the army as a teenager. They were hard times and 3 square meals a day in the Army was an attraction to many of that generation and provided an escape from the industrial areas of Great Britain.

    Steve
     
  2. Gonegirl

    Gonegirl Member

     

    Attached Files:

  3. Gonegirl

    Gonegirl Member

    You forgot to covert the shillings into to pounds for me or is it pence... Lol... I'll get me mam to do it no worries my nannas brother was down the mine because I asked my mam why he wasn't in the war well one of many her younger brother was in Burma died over there but that another day another story soon to be done lol.... So when my grandad did his 6 years in the army could he have left or was it when you got called up that was it no matter what... Sorry the screen shot I sent you was from his other service record I just took a photo of it from my mams so it was to say now I know what it means
    Cheers mags
     
  4. Tullybrone

    Tullybrone Senior Member

    Hi,

    If you are talking about the 6 years he served in peacetime 1925/31 he could’ve applied for his discharge by payment if he wasn’t enjoying his Army life but the cost was pretty high compared to the average family wage.

    One of the “jokes” my father told was in relation to the “buy me out” scenario -

    Telegram (ask your Nan what a telegram was) from soldier to his father -

    “Sell the Pig. Buy me out.”

    Telegram in reply from father

    “Pig Dead. Soldier on.”

    If you are asking about his 6 years wartime service - there was no option for a soldier to buy himself out of the army.

    Steve
     
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  5. minden1759

    minden1759 Senior Member

    1 Division was an infantry division so he would not have been equipped with tanks with artillery guns on top. These types of equipment - tank chassis with artillery guns on top, were found in armoured divisions rather than infantry divisions where the tracked vehicles could keep up with the fast moving tanks.

    2 Fd Regt RA were equipped with 25 pounder guns towed behind a truck.

    Regards

    Frank
     
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  6. Gonegirl

    Gonegirl Member

    I thought I knew a bit I know frigg all lol he doesn't even have any wedding photos so there's no way he would of bought himself out the army... You have some knowledge thanks Steve it's great talking to you.
    Mags
     
  7. minden1759

    minden1759 Senior Member

    On 3 Sep 39, 2 Fd Regt RA started with four batteries of six 25 pounder guns - 35 Battery, 42 Battery, 53 Battery and 87 Battery.

    Then, at the end of Sep, the Regt switched to two batteries of 12 guns by joining the original batteries together - 35/87 Battery and 42/53 Battery.

    Then, in Jan 44, in time for Anzio, it changed again to form three batteries each of eight guns - 35 Battery, 42 Battery and 53/87 Battery.

    Not sure where 42/45 came from.

    Regards

    Frank
     
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  8. Gonegirl

    Gonegirl Member

    Cheers for that Frank
    Mags
     
  9. Gonegirl

    Gonegirl Member

    Frank I was trying to remember and type what I had seen so it's just a mistake apologies.... I was just trying to get my head around all these batteries and regiments how they came together was it to make a bigger army that's all and if my grandad was 2nd field would he be with these but still known as 2nd field ... Its all alien to me but second nature to you and I think when people are tying they need to be mindful of this because I'm just not grasping it unless you speak geordie.... Lol ... I'll get there in the end I've learnt a lot already
    Cheers mags
     
  10. minden1759

    minden1759 Senior Member

    Mags.

    No worries. He would have worked in a Battery within a Regiment. The Battery is divided into two parts - the Gun Line and the Artillery Tactical Group. The Gun Line is where the guns were loaded and fired and the Artillery Tactical Groups were the people who identified targets for those guns and called in the fire.

    The Gun Line could be miles behind the Arty Tac Gps. The Arty Tac Gps were very often right at the front with the infantry foot soldiers. The Arty Tac Gps spoke to the Gun Line either by telephone cable or by radio and directed the fire.

    Does that help?

    Regards

    Frank
     
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  11. Gonegirl

    Gonegirl Member

    Yeah it does thanks for your help you've been a star
    Cheers mags
     
  12. minden1759

    minden1759 Senior Member

    Mags.

    To really get a much better understanding, you might want to join the trip to Anzio that I am running on 13-16 May 19.

    Regards

    Frank
     
  13. Gonegirl

    Gonegirl Member

    Frank
    If I didn't have 3 kids mate I would seriously consider it may be another time I would of liked to known about what he did where he went but I just can't justify going at the minute I will keep an eye on your site for future stuff and hopefully you will post it on here
    Cheers mags
     
  14. minden1759

    minden1759 Senior Member

    Mags.

    I fully understand.

    F
     
  15. Gonegirl

    Gonegirl Member

    Hi gus
    Just a quick one I'm hanging my head in shame I've been in touch with my mam and my grandad didn't drive the tanks he drove the the trucks you were right... Thanks for not shooting me down it was my uncle Billy who drove the tanks I come from a large army back ground all past on unfortunately so forgive me but its had to keep up with all them stories...mags
     
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  16. Gonegirl

    Gonegirl Member



    Hi thanks for the reply.... But your right it wasn't used by the 2nd field regiment .. My mistake I've just found out it was my uncle Billy who drove the tanks and not my grandad as I always thought..
    Cheers mags
     
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  17. Uncle Target

    Uncle Target Well-Known Member

    Might be getting another charge on my sheet ref search button but: 2nd Field Regiment RA were part of 1st Infantry Brigade 1st British Infantry Div.. They were a Regular Army Regiment at at one time gave Direct Fire Support the Guards. They were alongside 19th Field Regiment and 67th Field Regiment. There is a very good book called Ubique my Arthur Cheetham MC Brit Library No ISBN 0 9512853 0 0 Freshfield Books 1987 I got mine on Amazon World Books for 89p + p&p two years ago.
    They served in Tunisia and Italy including Anzio and Monte Grande on the Gothic Line.
    they used the ubiquitous 25 pounder Field Gun. Towed by the Quad Four wheel drive gun tractor so beloved of post war fairgrounds and circus'. in between the Quad and the gun was the ammunition trailer usually referred to as a limber.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
  18. Gonegirl

    Gonegirl Member

    Thanks for that... I will definitely have a look for that book aswell much appreciated... Mags x
     
  19. Uncle Target

    Uncle Target Well-Known Member

    Still getting incoming from Idler. Must be a better place to post an appeal.

    Can I change my defence lawyer he isn't riding to my rescue.

    Hull down and back to settings I suppose..
     
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