Normandy 2005 Pics

Discussion in 'All Anniversaries' started by ham and jam 1, Jun 24, 2005.

  1. ham and jam 1

    ham and jam 1 Member

    Thought I would post some pictures from my trip to Normandy this year. Obviously much more quieter than last year but still a good veteran turn out, and shame about the weather <_<

    Ranville Church and war cem

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    Ranville church tower (old one)

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    Plaque at bottom of church tower

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    You can see where the church received hits from German fire

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    The church and old tower topped with the flag of Normandy.

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    These two graves touching side by side are men from the 22nd Dragoon Guards RAC

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  2. ham and jam 1

    ham and jam 1 Member

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    Site of the first bailey bridge built over the Caen canal, about 700 yards South of the bridge

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    Benouville chateau, that Wally Parr fired on thinking there were enemy snipers in posistion.

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    Church tower at Le Port that gave 7th Para and the Ox and Bucks problems with snipers, until Corporal Killeen took it out with a PIAT.

    There are also 22 graves in the churchyard of the Ox and Bucks and 7th Para. One of these graves is of a private McGee 7th Para who should have won the VC according to some 7th Para vets I chatted to the next day at the Gondree cafe.

    " At about 10.30qm 3 large German tanks came rumbling along the main road from the direction of Caen. They stopped near the Chateau gates. Then the leading tank lowered its gun and fired a shell at the end of our posistion, Private McGee, who was near the main road picked up his Bren gun then started to walk up the middle of the road towards the tanks, firing the Bren gun from the hip. As one magazine became empty, he replaced it with a new one, discarding the empty mag on the road side. We could hear the bullets richocheting off the steel armour plating, the leading tank immediately closed down his visor thus making him blind to all things infront. Corporal Killen realised what was happening and ran up the side of the road, taking two gammon bombs. He threw the first bomb and it hit the leading tank where the turret meets the body, which nearly blew the turret off. He threw the second but it fell short, landing against the tanks track which was promptly blown off. This tank now tried to escape but, having only one good track, it went round in circles, so the crew baled out and were shot by MeGee."

    That was taken from "The tale of Two bridges"
     
  3. ham and jam 1

    ham and jam 1 Member

    A very wet Bayeux war cem

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    Russians buried next to Canadians and also Poles

    All these graves in the front row are from the 49th Recce regiment of the RAC, they all died on the 27th June or the day before or the day after, but most were on the 27th. probably the closing stages of Operation Martlet, with battles at Rauray and Tessel Wood
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    This is what I think must have been a bomber crew [​IMG]

    Thought this grave was interesting in that he was in the RAF but obvioulsy American and Jewish. What also puzzled me was what was Ferry Command?
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    This is the memorial to the Green Howards in Cristot and Stan Hollis VC

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  4. nolanbuc

    nolanbuc Senior Member

    Stunning and fascinating pictures! Thanks for sharing those! :)
     
  5. ham and jam 1

    ham and jam 1 Member

    Thanks nolanbuc

    Arromanches

    The rain was still coming down, but the place was full of veterans, and especially the museum which kept having coaches of the Normandy veterans Association turning up. In their honour there was a Scots band marching up and down the roads and they were very popular. They did the ladies from Hell proud.

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    Check out the SAS badges on the Para

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    These two old fellas were not getting very far, they kept being stopped for photos and handshakes

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    I saw this picture on the side of a cafe wall

    A section of the Mullberry harbour
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    I did want to visit Arromanches on the 6th also as there was to be an unvieling of this memorial plaque to the landing craft crews that took part in the operation and subsequent days, as there was not one before. id heard about the unvieling from a friend who was a LC crew member at sword beach
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    This lovely old fella was looking through the post cards outside one of the shops, I asked him if he was Durham Light infantry to which he said he was, he said he was in the 50th TT div and landed on Gold beach
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    The Scots band entertaing the crowds outside a cafe where many veterans were sat having a VERY early beer

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  6. Kiwiwriter

    Kiwiwriter Very Senior Member

    Ferry Command was just what it says it was...the arm of the RAF that moved planes and supplies from Point A to Point B. The WRAAFs who learned to fly flew ferry planes, delivering them from factory to fighter base.

    Those shtos of graves are fantastic and moving. What's the story on the Russian graves?
     
  7. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER

    Thanks Ham and Jam,

    Fantastic as we were just talking about the Mulberry Harbour and Arromanches the other day on the forum.

    It is a long march from Australia however I hope to be there in June 2007.
     
  8. 8th KRI

    8th KRI Member

    Thanks for the photos - particularly Bayeux, I am always moved by the sheer scale and numbers of graves, such a graphic representation of the scale of the loss. I haven't yet had the opportunity yet to visit my uncle's grave at Bayeux - so the photos are appreciated.

    Chris.
     
  9. ham and jam 1

    ham and jam 1 Member

    Hi David, I wonder myself about why those Russian graves are there.

    Cheers Spidge, yea long way to go for you but its really worth it, if Normandy is your interest.

    Thanks Chris, ive been before to Bayeux a couple of times but this time it was raining so much it was dodgy getting the camera out. But I had to go as I was asked by a veteran friend to take some pictures and his mates graves, and to put some poppy crosses on them. I will be going again next year and if you would like me to take some pics for you of your uncle's grave send me an email if im not about.

    These were 4 lads from the Rifle brigade (London rifle brigade) who were all killed by the same machine gun during a battle at a place called St Martin's.

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    The first lad from the left was 21 and on the bottom of his gravestone is inscribed, "Our dear beloved youngest son Morris, may you rest in peace, Dad mum and Victor. The next lad was 22 and must have been Jewish as he has a Star of David on his stone, which the inscription at the bottom reading "Treasured memories of my dearest husband, sadly missed by all". Now the next one got to me, he was 39 and his inscription read, "You'll ever be my sweetheart, and our daddy" then the names of his wife and children :( . Next another lad of 23 who had wrote on the bottom, " Death divides but memories remain, Til we meet again.

    Pegasus

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    7th Para veteran at cafe Gondree

    So as well as Paras at the cafe, who were there 61 years ago there were also the commandos, and this picture has 2 Paras and Commandos standing together.
    The veteran in red furthest left was Pine Coffins body guard and ended up 2nd SAS regt :huh:

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    French SAS veteran
     
  10. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor

    Really fancinating photos, thanks for sharing those.

    If someone reminds me I will upload my Normandy photos from 2003 when I get back from Tanzania.
     
  11. ham and jam 1

    ham and jam 1 Member

    Ch√Ęteau de la Londe is a place where Richard Harris a very close friend of Brian Guy fought, he was in the Suffolks, Brian has described this area as the bloodiest square mile in Normandy. The Chateau is just North of Caen.

    I wrote to Dick Harris and he asked me if I would make a visit to see if the memorial to the Suffolks is still there and to take a picture for him.

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    Memorial just outside the drive, about 20 yards to the left.

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    Countryside outside the Chateau

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    Poppy cross I put at the foot of the Suffolks memorial, I did write Richard Harris on the cross but cant pick it out very well.

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    map next to memorial showing lines of attack

    Andy
     
  12. ham and jam 1

    ham and jam 1 Member

    A very wet 6th June

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    Ranville

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    I was hoping to meet a friend at Ranville, Fred Glover 9th para who was in one of the gliders that should have landed inside the Merville battery, but after being shot up it landed near an orchard just down the road from it.

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    Fred is the one on the left

    Fred's story
    http://www.6juin1944.com/veterans/glover.php

    I needed to be in two places at once, as I also was supposed to be meeting Tich Rayner a Pegasus bridge vet, who was supposed to be giving me a copy of his story. From left to right, Nobby Clarke, Tich Rayner, Tom Packwood of the Ox and Bucks that landed at the bridge and in the wheel chair Geoff Barkway one of the glider pilots.
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    Tich Rayner

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    Tom Packwood and his wife Joan

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    Otway's statue inside the battery grounds at Merville

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    My daughter looking out of a casemate

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    Meeting up with Fred again at the battery
     
  13. Paul Reed

    Paul Reed Ubique

    Welcome to the forum Ham & Jam - nice to see you here. Great photos; work meant I couldn't make 6th June this year, so it was nice to see these photos - thanks.
     
  14. ham and jam 1

    ham and jam 1 Member

    Cheers Paul, well to be honest it was a wash out I even came home a day early. Im just hoping Holland in September will be a lot drier :huh:

    Andy
     
  15. jamesicus

    jamesicus Senior Member

    Wonderful photos -- thank you very much for posting them.

    James
     

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