New Ancestry files - updates

Discussion in 'Research Material' started by Tricky Dicky, Jun 29, 2017.

  1. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    I note on Ancestry that they have increased their database for WW1 files:

    UK, WWI War Diaries (Gallipoli and Dardanelles), 1914-1916
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. UK, WWI War Diaries (Gallipoli and Dardanelles), 1914-1916 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
    Original data: War Office. First World War and Army of Occupation War Diaries. WO 95/4263-4359. The National Archives of the UK, Kew, Surrey, England.

    About UK, WWI War Diaries (Gallipoli and Dardanelles), 1914-1916
    You can use this collection of war diaries from the First World War to get a picture of day-to-day life in your ancestor’s unit. The diaries include information on a unit’s movements, where the unit was stationed on a given day, what activities troops were engaged in, and other information, such as embarkation, travel, or casualties.



    UK, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. UK, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
    Original data: First World War and Army of Occupation War Diaries. WO 95/1096–3948. The National Archives of the UK, Kew, Surrey, England.

    About UK, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920
    These war diaries document operations for British and colonial units serving in theatres of operations between 1914 and 1920, including Russia, at home, and in the colonies, as well as British military missions and Armies of Occupation between 1919 and 1920. The diaries contain daily reports on operations, intelligence summaries, and other pertinent material, and they can provide an on-the-spot description of what your ancestor experienced. The range of dates shown for individual items does not mean there is a document inside the file for each day between the two covering dates.
    No diaries for the campaign in South West Africa in 1914-1915 are included in this series because no British units participated; operations were conducted under the auspices of the South African armed forces.


    If you need a look up just ask

    TD
     
  2. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    Just stumbled across this one as well:

    UK, WWII Civil Defence Gallantry Awards, 1940-1949
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. UK, WWII Civil Defence Gallantry Awards, 1940-1949 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
    Original data: Inter-departmental Committee on Civil Defence Gallantry Awards: Minutes and Recommendations. Digitised images. Records of the Home Office, Ministry of Home Security, and related bodies, HO 250. The National Archives of the UK, Kew, Surrey, England.


    About UK, WWII Civil Defence Gallantry Awards, 1940-1949
    During World War II, up to 1.9 million men, women, and teens as young as 15 served as Civil Defence Volunteers in various capacities. They worked as air raid wardens, first aid workers, firewatchers, messengers, in rescue efforts, in rest centres, and emergency feeding programmes. Acts of bravery by civilians, police, and fire were rewarded with a variety of awards and medals.
    This collection contains digitised copies of evidence submitted to the Inter-departmental Committee on Civil Defence Gallantry Awards and its recommendations to the Chatfield Committee. The evidence can include the name and age of the person being recommended, the date and details of his or her actions of merit, lists of supporting documentation and possibly copies, who made the recommendation (name or title), tenure, occupation, and the type of award received or denied.
    The main civilian gallantry awards in the 19th and early 20th centuries were:
    African Police Medal (later the Colonial Police Medal)
    Albert Medal―for merchant seamen, the Royal Navy, and later firemen, miners, railwaymen, the army, and others
    British Empire Medal―from 1922 for meritorious service; primarily for civilians but also for the military in certain circumstances
    Constabulary Medal (Ireland)
    Edward Medal―for miners, quarrymen, and later dock workers and railwaymen
    Empire Gallantry Medal―from 1922 for meritorious service; primarily for civilians but also for the military in certain circumstances
    George Cross―from 1940 for meritorious service, replacing the Empire Gallantry Medal and later the Edward Medal and Albert Medal; primarily for civilians but also for the military in certain circumstances
    George Medal―from 1940 for meritorious service; primarily for civilians but also for the military in certain circumstances
    King’s Medal for Service in the Cause of Freedom―British honours to foreigners for war service
    King’s Police Medal (later the King’s Police and Fire Services Medal and now the Queen’s Police Medal)
    Queen’s Gallantry Medal―from 1974 for meritorious service
    Sea Gallantry Medal―for merchant seamen
    Portions of this description are courtesy of The National Archives, Kew, England.


    TD
     
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  3. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    UK, WWII Alien Internees, 1939-1945
    About UK, WWII Alien Internees, 1939-1945
    Historical Context
    This collection provides details of foreign nationals interned by the British government during World War Two. Internment started immediately following the outbreak of war in 1939, with a small number of Germans being sent to tribunals for assessment as a potential danger to the country. This was expanded to Austrians in May 1940, and then to Italians in the same year. If deemed to be ‘high risk’, the individual was immediately interned, or deported. Those labelled as ‘doubts’ were let go but supervised and those deemed ‘low-risk’ were released. A large number of internees were made up of German and Austrian Jews. The measure of internment was scaled back toward the end of the war and by 1943-1944, most internees had been released.
    What can I find in these records?
    You may be able to find the following information (where available):
    Name
    Gender
    Date of Birth
    Date of Internment
    Date of Death
    Date of Discharge

    TD
     
    Chris C and bamboo43 like this.
  4. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    Thought these two record sets added to Ancestry recently maybe of some help to somebody. I've copied the text direct from Ancestry's description. Looks interesting.

    About Europe, Registration of Foreigners and German Persecutees, 1939-1947

    The Nazi persecution of both foreigners and German persecutees during the Second World War resulted in the forceable incarceration of these individuals throughout the German Reich and the territories occupied by Germany. Following the war, the Allies began a concentrated effort in both the occupied zones of Germany and Europe to document these individuals.

    This collection consists of foreigners and German persecutees in Germany between 1939-1947 who were persecuted by public institutions, social securities and companies. The records may also include information on those who died, including burial information. The documents were assembled according to the Zones of Occupation - American, British, French and Soviet - by the Allied forces within Germany. Areas outside Germany were also recorded.


    About Africa, Asia and Europe, Passenger Lists of Displaced Persons, 1946-1971

    The upheavals wrought by Nazi persecution and the Second World War caused mass uprooting of individuals and groups. Many of these individuals wished to emigrate from Europe in order to begin a new life – a goal supported and coordinated by the International Refugee Organization (IRO) and later by the Intergovernmental Committee for the Movements of Migrants from Europe (ICEM).


    This collection consists of passenger lists of immigrants leaving Germany and other European ports and airports between 1946-1971. The majority of the immigrants listed in this collection are displaced persons - Holocaust survivors, former concentration camp inmates and Nazi forced laborers, as well as refugees from Central and Eastern European countries and some non-European countries. Many of the immigrants listed in the collection fall outside the ITS (International Tracing Service) mandate.


    The records in this collection are organized by Resettlement Camp location where immigrants began their journey. These centers were the first step in their long journey.


    The documents in the collections have been created by:


    International Refugee Organization (IRO) including the Preparatory Commission for the International Refugee Organization (PCIRO)

    Intergovernmental Committee on European Migration (ICEM)

    United States War Shipping Administration and Maritime Commission

    Publication of these documents has been made possible through partnership with the Arolsen Archives (formerly the International Tracing Service, or ITS). The Arolsen Archives are an international center on Nazi persecution with the world's most comprehensive archive on the victims and survivors of National Socialism. Their collection has information on about 17.5 million people and belongs to the UNESCO's Memory of the World. It contains documents on the various victim groups targeted by the Nazi regime and is an important source of knowledge for society today.
     
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  5. Mr Jinks

    Mr Jinks Bit of a Cad

    Also available online (without Ancestry)
    Internationaler Suchdienst

    I cannot master the search function (not understanding German) so reverted back to Ancestry and found a list of `British` German Persecutees ?? Victims of Nazi persecution ? But not sure in what context one name Thomas Anslow from Cullercoats was a 2nd DLI Sergeant captured at Saint Venant on 27th May 1940?
    0046_69792369_1anslow.jpg

    These may have been PoWs residing in the American Zone prior to repatriation??

    Kyle
     
    amberdog45 likes this.
  6. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    Thanks for that post Kyle. I'm not subscribed and was curious what was lurking in that collection.

    Today's update. I receive email with updates from a site called Lost Cousins. I've copied the piece below about the reduced rate for obtaining Wills. Post 1858 it now costs £1.50 instead of £10.

    "Last month I reported an 85% drop in the cost of post-1858 wills from the Probate Service, bringing the cost down from £10 to just £1.50 - and not surprisingly this big reduction has resulted in a vastly-increased demand, with numerous people reporting to me that estimated delivery dates have been and gone".

    Find a will | GOV.UK
     
  7. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    About Africa, Asia and Europe, Passenger Lists of Displaced Persons, 1946-1971

    The upheavals wrought by Nazi persecution and the Second World War caused mass uprooting of individuals and groups. Many of these individuals wished to emigrate from Europe in order to begin a new life – a goal supported and coordinated by the International Refugee Organization (IRO) and later by the Intergovernmental Committee for the Movements of Migrants from Europe (ICEM).
    This collection consists of passenger lists of immigrants leaving Germany and other European ports and airports between 1946-1971. The majority of the immigrants listed in this collection are displaced persons - Holocaust survivors, former concentration camp inmates and Nazi forced laborers, as well as refugees from Central and Eastern European countries and some non-European countries. Many of the immigrants listed in the collection fall outside the ITS (International Tracing Service) mandate.
    The records in this collection are organized by Resettlement Camp location where immigrants began their journey. These centers were the first step in their long journey.
    The documents in the collections have been created by:
    International Refugee Organization (IRO) including the Preparatory Commission for the International Refugee Organization (PCIRO)
    Intergovernmental Committee on European Migration (ICEM)
    United States War Shipping Administration and Maritime Commission
    Publication of these documents has been made possible through partnership with the Arolsen Archives (formerly the International Tracing Service, or ITS). The Arolsen Archives are an international center on Nazi persecution with the world's most comprehensive archive on the victims and survivors of National Socialism. Their collection has information on about 17.5 million people and belongs to the UNESCO's Memory of the World. It contains documents on the various victim groups targeted by the Nazi regime and is an important source of knowledge for society today.

    TD
     
    Mr Jinks, BFBSM, CL1 and 2 others like this.
  8. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    A UN dataset has been added today on Ancestry. Probably need a worldwide subscription to access.

    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Ancestry.com. United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration(UNRRA) Records, 1943-1947 (USHMM) [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2018.
    This collection was indexed by World Memory Project contributors from the digitized holdings of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, UNRRA Selected Records. For more information about this collection, click on the collection title above to access the USHMM’s catalog record, or email worldmemoryproject@ushmm.org.
     
  9. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    Stuck tracing somebody from Yorkshire? New school records added to Find My Past today.

    "
    Discover your Yorkshire ancestors who attended or were teachers in schools between 1862 and 1959. This new and exclusive collection of more than 137,000 transcripts allows you to explore their school records to find the year and the school they attended.

    The collection includes records from 63 schools in Yorkshire’s West Riding. School records can be an extremely rich source of information for genealogy research and add colour to the life of your ancestor with the details that they provide"

    Text quoted from Findmypast Fridays blog.

    Edit: also new on Ancestry, Electoral Registers for Pembrokeshire, Wales 1740-1978.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2019
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  10. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    Didn't even know there was such a collection. Not released in full until 2045 unfortunately. One to tell the grandkids to check. Text copied from the Lost Cousins newsletter 6/9/19.

    "press release from 2005 appeals for former evacuees to contact their Research Centre for Evacuees and War Child Studies. Sadly for family historians the responses to the questionnaire will be sealed in the archives of Reading University until 2045 - but if you’re wondering whether one of your relatives might have contributed, the good news is that I found a number of PDF documents that list thousands of contributors, and you can search them by name or town. Usefully both the maiden and current surnames are given for married women; in some cases (mostly in Document A) schools are listed; the snippet below comes from Document B:


    [​IMG]


    Note: the Roger Calver shown above ISN'T a relative of mine, but his ancestors came from a village not far from where my own ancestors lived; ironically I can trace his Calver ancestors back further than I can my own. You can see and hear Roger Calver talking about his evacuation in a short video on the BBC News website.


    Evacuee database Document A - details of around 700 children who were sent overseas (169 pages)

    Evacuee database Document B - details of around 3000 children who were evacuated within the UK (672 pages)

    Evacuee database Document C - audio recordings including radio broadcasts (36 pages)

    Evacuee database Document E - school records (3 pages)

    Evacuee database Document F - academic research eg dissertations (8 pages)

    Evacuee database Document G - press cuttings and articles (5 pages)

    Evacuee database Document H - video recordings (11 pages)

    Evacuee database Document I - exhibition materials including posters (2 pages)

    Evacuee database Document J - list of correspondence, includes many names (29 pages)


    As far as I can tell, not all of the records are closed, but most of those relating to individuals are. Nevertheless, finding the name of one of your relatives in the list could provide you with additional background and new lines of enquiry.


    Tip: millions of children were evacuated, so the chance that a particular individual is one of those who contributed is small. But the chance of finding someone from the same town, or even the same school, is much higher - for example, many of the children who lived in Ilford were evacuated to Suffolk, especially Ipswich (which was where I eventually found my late mother in the 1939 Register)".

    https://www.reading.ac.uk/news-archive/press-releases/pr148.html

     
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  11. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    New Ancestry collection covering surnames A-P. The rest to be added later.

    About UK, WWII Royal Artillery Tracer Cards, 1939-1948


    Historical Context

    Since its inception in 1716, the Royal Regiment of Artillery, commonly referred to as 'The Gunners', has served as the artillery arm of the British Army, supplying it's firepower. At its peak during the Second World War, there were over one million men serving in 960 gunner regiments and at the end of the War, the RA was larger than the Royal Navy.

    This Collection

    This collection comprises cards created to track the movements of soldiers between units within the Royal Artillery during WWII. The role of the Tracer card was to answer the question 'where is that man right now?', saving the burden of administration and searching through many files. Only 'Other Ranks', or in other words those who were not commissioned officers, are included.

    The following information can be found, where available:

    • Name
    • Date of birth
    • Place and Date of death
    • Place and date of Enlistment
    • Date of discharge
    • Gender
    • Regiment and unit
    • Service rank
    • Service number
    Please Note:In this first release, we have included all records for servicemen with surnames starting A-P. We will be adding all remaining cards in a future update.
     
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  12. AB64

    AB64 Senior Member

    That's great news, I got a couple of these from firepower years ago but they told me they had gone to findmypast to digitise (I guess that was a mistake or they did a deal) so I have been waiting impatiently since then. I have a lot of RA paybooks but absolutely no idea of which unit so that's my afternoon sorted
     
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  13. researchingreg

    researchingreg Well-Known Member


    Thanks for this information, but I could not find Bombardier Frederick Richard Hinslea 1467422, or Gunner Fred Hensley (born Ashbourne 1 Aug 1918) 143 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery 386 Battery (Kent Yeomanry) on the tracer Cards, so some men must be left off
     
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  14. AB64

    AB64 Senior Member

    A researcher I spoke to a while ago told me the set was incomplete, he mentioned a couple of letters and also those killed or commissioned (the last is confirmed above) - I'm hoping he was wrong on the missing ones. At the moment I cant even get Ancestry to open
     
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  15. Charley Fortnum

    Charley Fortnum Dreaming of Red Eagles

    Thanks for the heads-up. Potentially very useful.

    Can I access this with their 'free trial'?

    It's been two years since I used a 'free weekend' with Ancestry and I've completely forgotten how it works.

    Hoping to check Gunner Newman's post-war card.
     
  16. amberdog45

    amberdog45 Senior Member

    Charley, you could try the trial if you have a different email address? Otherwise they'd likely trace you back to previous subscription.

    Having said that, I bet there will be a free weekend around Remembrance Sunday weekend.

    UK, WWII Royal Artillery Tracer Cards, 1939-1948

    Remember and use the Soundex option on surname searches. Ancestry are renowned for their transcription errors.

     
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  17. AB64

    AB64 Senior Member

    I'm sure someone will help Charley out - if they haven't already :)

    I notice its only on the premium/worldwide subscription, I've had to upgrade - I'm still having real troubles getting logged on though
     
    Charley Fortnum likes this.
  18. Guy Hudson

    Guy Hudson Looker-upper

    I searched for 119 service numbers and found only 26 tracer cards.
     
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  19. Charley Fortnum

    Charley Fortnum Dreaming of Red Eagles

    1 for 1 here.

    Thank you, AB64
     
  20. AB64

    AB64 Senior Member

    First 10 I've tried and no hits (well first 10 for myself) and these are guys who are in the RA number bands so should be there. Do the cards only cover RA enlistment or does it also include those who transferred in? How about GS Corps and Yeomanry etc units that became RA
     
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