Metal detecting finds

Discussion in 'WW2 Militaria' started by Alverna metaldetecting, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. Hello.
    I am from holland and for my hobby i search with metaldetector.now i found a lot of personal items from ww2 soldiers. it was a big dumphole. is there anybody who can help me to find out with these service numbers.
    I have found all this nearby Nijmegen.the places where was operation market garden.
    I will poste some pictures,but i dont no how.
    you can email me at p.strik@outlook.com
    numbers are. 2737032 GG2616852 2324391 6010376.
    i found these he is burried in Holland at the Canadian war cementry Groesbeek.2618871 Percy buckerfield.
    a bracelet from H morgan 872329. burried in Holland (Eindhoven) at war cementry

    sorry for my bad Englisch
    greetings Paul strik
     
  2. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    moved your post from the ''number block allocations'' thread

    the numbers can be found in the following blocks, that shows what regiment the soldier enlisted into. they may have been posted to other units afterwards

    2737032 = Welsh Guards 2730001 - 2744000

    2616852 = Grenadier Guards 2604001 - 2646000

    2324391 =Royal Corps of Signals 2303001 - 2604000

    6010376 = Essex Regiment 5998001 - 6076000
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2017
    4jonboy and dbf like this.
  3. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    Full CWGC details:


    Casualty Details
    BUCKERFIELD, PERCY
    Rank: Guardsman
    Service No: 2618871
    Date of Death: 27/09/1944
    Age: 29
    Regiment/Service: Grenadier Guards, 1st Bn.
    Grave Reference: XII. C. 13.
    Cemetery: GROESBEEK CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY
    Additional Information: Son of Robert Moden Buckerfield and Jane Buckerfield; husband of Sylvia Buckerfield, of Kettering, Northamptonshire, England.


    Casualty Details
    MORGAN, HARRY
    Rank: Gunner
    Service No: 872329
    Date of Death: 26/09/1944
    Age: 29
    Regiment/Service: Royal Artillery, 153 (The Leicestershire Yeomanry) Field Regt.
    Grave Reference: Plot KK. Grave 132.
    Cemetery: EINDHOVEN (WOENSEL) GENERAL CEMETERY
    Additional Information: Son of Harry and Blodwen Morgan; husband of Violet Morgan, of Midsomer Norton, Somerset.



    The best place to upload images would be the Gallery on the forum.
    Media | WW2Talk
    Screen Shot 2017-02-11 at 20.36.25.png
     
  4. Swiper

    Swiper Resident Sospan

    "I am from holland and for my hobby i search with metaldetector.now i found a lot of personal items from ww2 soldiers. it was a big dumphole. is there anybody who can help me to find out with these service numbers.
    I have found all this nearby Nijmegen.the places where was operation market garden."

    So basically you're an enthusiast walking around battlefields looting items. Even going so far as to state you like doing jollies around MG sites?

    We shouldn't encourage this. At all.
     
    horsapassenger likes this.
  5. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    So long as this was done responsibly - according to laws of the country - I don't have a problem. I certainly wouldn't tar everyone who participates in this pastime with the same brush as the worst cases we've heard about.

    I wonder though, given the nature of this cache, (same personal kit belonging to men from different units, two of whom were confirmed as fatalities with known graves) if a Casualty Clearing Station or similar was in that location at the time.
     
    canuck and Rich Payne like this.
  6. Shiny 9th

    Shiny 9th Member Patron

    Are you hoping to return found items to family of the deceased? I wondered about your intentions.
     
  7. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

  8. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter Patron 1940 Obsessive

    I suspect that dbf's suggestion is pretty accurate. Personal items that were unceremoniously dumped when the unfortunate casualties didn't make it.

    Much of Northern Europe is a battlefield in one way or another and homes and farms were briefly part of that. Provided that there are no human remains or unexploded ordnance, it seems normal that a landowner can allow the excavation of a rubbish pit on his land. The alternative will often be that the whole lot is scooped up by an excavator and dumped in a container. These finds are at least being researched and brass items won't survive in the soil forever.
     
    dbf likes this.
  9. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    See comments after the Gallery image linked here:
    20170108_082054 | WW2Talk

    ".I want to try using this forum to the other numbers to figure out and where these are are of burried.zo also want to find out any family remained so that i can maby make contact with them.I found Morgan and Buckerfield by google.I have great respect for the men who fought in ww2.have these graves visited with my childeren.it remains impressive.all information are welkom."


    Given High Wood's reply, it does indeed look like some CCS (or even a RAP) was involved.
    "With regard to the other button sticks:
    2737032 belonged to L/Cpl T J Nooks, 1/ Welsh Guards who was wounded 23rd September 1944 and
    2616852 belonged to L/Sgt A Williamson, 1/Grenadier Guards, who was wounded on 29th September 1944."
     
    Drew5233 likes this.

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