Medal Entitlement

Discussion in 'General' started by HERITAGE PLUS, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. HERITAGE PLUS

    HERITAGE PLUS Active Member

    I have a man a WW1 veteran who re-enlisted in 1939.

    His service record shows:

    Home 22.11.39 - 2.1.40
    France 3.1.40 - 21.2.40
    Home 22.2.40 - 2.4.41

    Discharged on health grounds.

    Am I right in saying that he would have been entitled to the 1939-45 War Medal?
     
  2. Tullybrone

    Tullybrone Senior Member

    IMHO - Yes he would’ve been entitled to War Medal - criteria 28 days service.

    No entitlement to 39/45 Star for service overseas as usually needed 6 months service.

    He MIGHT be entitled to Defence Medal as well - it has a complicated list of eligibility criteria.

    Steve
     
    Tricky Dicky likes this.
  3. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Re member

    Medals: campaigns, descriptions and eligibility

    War Medal 1939 to 1945
    The War Medal is awarded to all full time personnel of the armed forces wherever they were serving. The medal was granted in addition to campaign stars and the Defence Medal.
    To apply for the War Medal, you must have served at least 28 days between 3 September 1939 and 2 September 1945.
    The colours of the ribbon represent the Union Jack.


    Defence Medal
    The Defence Medal is awarded for non-operational service such as those service personnel working in headquarters, on training bases and airfields and members of the Home Guard. The medal is also awarded for non-operational service overseas for example in India or South Africa.
    To apply for the Defence Medal, you must have either:
    1080 days (3 years) service in the UK between 3 Sep 1939 and 8 May 1945
    1080 days (3 years) service in the Home Guard between 14 May 1940 and 31 Dec 1944 (you will also need to fill out and send the Home Guard service questionnaire)
    360 days (1 year) non operational service overseas between 3 Sep 1939 and 2 Sep 1945
    180 days non operational service in an overseas area deemed to be closely threatened or subject to air attack between 3 September 1939 and 8 May 1945
    The colours of the ribbon symbolise enemy attacks on Britain’s ‘green and pleasant land’ and the black out.

    TD
     
  4. HERITAGE PLUS

    HERITAGE PLUS Active Member

    Thanks chaps
     

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