Mack Museum Visit

Discussion in 'Weapons, Technology & Equipment' started by Dave55, Oct 10, 2012.

  1. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    Hi all,

    Stopped at the Mack museum while passing through Allentown, Pennsylvania to see if they had an NO in their rotating collection this time.

    Jackpot, albeit with a later addition closed cab, possibly from an NR.

    This thing is huge. The addition of a shot of one of the better looking forum members gives an idea of scale. I had thought of them as just a beefier GMC 2 1/2 ton but that is far from the case :)
     

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  2. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    Here is a 1925 AC. 6000 of these were shipped to Europe during WWI for the American and British Armies. The Brits named it the Bull Dog, which stuck as "Bulldog" ever since. The AC was made from 1916-1938. This one has pneumatic tires.
     

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  3. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    A beautiful 47 Brockway tractor. Mack took over Brockway in the mid-fifites.
    This one has the same windshield and cab from the firewall back as they used on their WWII M1 wrecker. I included a net shot of the M1 for reference.
     

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  4. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    A neat 1939 BX tractor.
     

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  5. Oldman

    Oldman Very Senior Member

    Dave
    This is some Road Trip!
     
  6. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    Dave,

    Super photographs and the Recovery Truck looks a mean machine.

    If you get up into North carolina there was a great Truck Museum that I visited with friends some years ago.

    C Grier Beam Truck Museum.

    Beam Truck Museum - Trucks

    Regards
    Tom
     
  7. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Lovely pics, Keep on Truckin'.
     
  8. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    In 1973 two buddies and I pulled this 1927 Mack AC out of the woods on a farm we were working on in New York state. It had been abandoned there for about fifteen years. We squirted a lot of solvent down the spark plug holes and dragged it down a dirt road with a tractor until the engine broke free and it fired up. It took us a while to figure out how to work the magneto controls on the steering wheel but eventually we got it. We played around with it all summer but in the fall I went away to college and the other two guys got year round jobs and also left. When winter came that year, no one thought to drain the water out of the engine and radiator so it froze and cracked the block. And that was the end of this Mack. Here she is 39 years later in the same spot where she last ran. Sad.
     

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  9. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Here she is 39 years later in the same spot where she last ran. Sad.

    Who owns it now?
    Someone would love to restore it, wouldnt they?
    Or were so many made that there is no interest .
     
  10. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    Set 2
     

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  11. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    Set 3
     

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  12. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    Hello again,

    I found some youtube videos of running ACs.

    The radiator is behind the engine and is cooled by a squirrel cage fan on the flywheel, like a big lawn mower engine. It is a 4 cylinder with two sets of two cylinders cast separately on a common crank case. I think the displacement is around 425 cubic inches.

    [YOUTUBE]FgogZEOeQlY[/YOUTUBE]

    [YOUTUBE]RGAj1OF4fVM[/YOUTUBE]
     
  13. Smudger Jnr

    Smudger Jnr Our Man in Berlin

    Dave,

    The cement mixer truck looks to be a real beast.

    Regards
    Tom
     
  14. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    Stopped by the museum again last month. It is attached to their Northeast Headquarters office building and I wondered in and acted like I was supposed to be there (the old walking around looking down at some papers trick). I got into a back lot with a bunch of project trucks waiting for restoration.

    The green one is an L model tractor from late 40's or early 50s. I think the middle one is a WWII NO with a nice civilian cab conversion. Note the US military wheels. The very rusty dump truck is a medium duty model E, I think.

    upload_2019-1-23_13-52-27.png
     
  15. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    Here's an AC Bulldog and a flatbed that I can't identify

    upload_2019-1-23_13-59-25.png
     
  16. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    They had their NO conversion out in the back. It was on the museum floor during the last visit.

    upload_2019-1-23_14-6-42.png
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2019
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  17. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    Another unlocked door and I found myself in a workshop with an NO being restored. Pictures are a bit hurried. I was escorted back to the public areas shortly thereafter.


    upload_2019-1-23_14-12-34.png

    upload_2019-1-23_14-14-35.png
     
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  18. Dave55

    Dave55 Very Senior Member

    Seven year update.

    Hood (bonnet?) sheet metal is deteriorating badly with a lot of perforations now. Front fenders are now gone. I think a tree fell on it and knocked them off

    upload_2019-8-12_13-15-11.png

    upload_2019-8-12_13-16-59.png
     

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