Legacy from the Dutch

Discussion in 'Canada' started by canuck, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

  2. Philip Reinders

    Philip Reinders Very Senior Member

    Well she is not my Hero, they all cost us loads and loads of money! and tells us to adapt our lifestyle, bollocks
     
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  3. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    It wasn't really about her. It was about the tulips. Keep em coming.
     
  4. williams46

    williams46 WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    No mention of who whisked the Dutch queen away just one hour before the Germans got there. Credit should be given where credit is due, if known of course.
     
  5. wowtank

    wowtank Very Senior Member

    Peeps should read The Cult of Kingship in Anglo-Saxon England. And know what a Monarchy should be about. Nuff said muhaha
     
  6. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    Clearly, I should have removed any reference to royalty so people could have focused on the point of the story........... the f........g tulips. :wacko:
     
  7. ramacal

    ramacal 336/102 LAA Regiment (7 Lincolns), RA Patron

    No mention of who whisked the Dutch queen away just one hour before the Germans got there. Credit should be given where credit is due, if known of course.

    The Destroyer HEREWARD, escorted by destroyer VESPER, evacuated Queen Wilhelmena of Holland from the Hook of Holland at noon on the 13th May 1940 and took her to Harwich, arriving at 1700

    Some pages from Wilhelmina's autobiography relating to the events just prior to and during her evacuation.

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  8. ronald

    ronald Senior Member

    Thanks Canuck, i didn't knew that from the tulips, It's a good way to
    show the bond between Canada and Holland.


    Ron
     
  9. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot Patron 1940 Obsessive

    Cheers Rob...Whats the book called?


    The Destroyer HEREWARD, escorted by destroyer VESPER, evacuated Queen Wilhelmena of Holland from the Hook of Holland at noon on the 13th May 1940 and took her to Harwich, arriving at 1700

    Some pages from Wilhelmina's autobiography relating to the events just prior to and during her evacuation.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. ramacal

    ramacal 336/102 LAA Regiment (7 Lincolns), RA Patron

    Andy

    The Dutch original (Eenzaam Maar Niet Alleen) was published in 1959.

    The English translation was published in 1960.

    Lonely But Not Alone by

    H.R.H. Willhelmina, Princess of the Netherlands.

    Published by Hutchison & Co Ltd.

    Cheers - Rob
     
  11. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Clearly, I should have removed any reference to royalty so people could have focused on the point of the story........... the f........g tulips. :wacko:
    I feel your frustration
    Now you see why we get pissed off when people raise politics, religion & race on here.
    We're alot better off when we stick to WW2 topics.
     
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  12. williams46

    williams46 WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Couldn't open the two email messages, clicking on message encountered a revolving door each email, my son tried, same results. Re. Dutch Queen, the journey to the ship was the knowledge I needed, the land portion. It did not mention any British Troops in the escort, so that would mean only the ship voyage portion was British. There was a book published in Britain dealing with British Troops escorting the Dutch Queen before the Germans arrived, I have not read the book and do not know the title, believe it was written by a Captain Tilley. I had his email and will try and contact him on the matter, I also met him a few years ago he was 86 years of age at the time. I'll see what I can find out.
     
  13. dbf

    dbf Moderatrix MOD

    Couldn't open the two email messages, clicking on message encountered a revolving door each email, my son tried, same results. Re. Dutch Queen, the journey to the ship was the knowledge I needed, the land portion. It did not mention any British Troops in the escort, so that would mean only the ship voyage portion was British. There was a book published in Britain dealing with British Troops escorting the Dutch Queen before the Germans arrived, I have not read the book and do not know the title, believe it was written by a Captain Tilley. I had his email and will try and contact him on the matter, I also met him a few years ago he was 86 years of age at the time. I'll see what I can find out.

    I found these links referring to Captain Tilley Welsh Guards, hope it's OK to link on Canuck's tulip thread
    A BBC Peoples War article featuring Captain Tilley
    BBC - WW2 People's War - Rescue of the Dutch Royal Family by the Irish and Welsh Guards

    WW2 memories site, a few other accounts linked on the page:
    WWII Memories

    If this is the same gentleman then I'm very sorry, as this will be some bad news for you to hear
    Hitler kills World War Two veteran... 67 years after bullets hit him in the leg on D-Day | Mail Online

    :poppy:


    2nd Irish Guards and a Company of 2nd Welsh Guards made up Harpoon Force.
    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/431525-post11.html
    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/irish-guards/16709-2nd-battalion-irish-guards-2.html

    Hope you don't mind me asking - Was it your cousin who served with Welsh Guards and if so, was he with 1WG at Arras or with 2WG at the Hook and Boulogne?

    Regards
    Diane
     
  14. williams46

    williams46 WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    What luck, I did not have Dai Tilley's email address in my computer so took a chance and went to Wales Newspapers on the internet, on 'Western Mail and South Wales Echo' looked up Ex-Pat archives and was surprised to find what I needed.
    Following taken off the internet a few minutes ago
    Dai Tilley puts the record straight.

    South Wales survivors of a dare devil secret mission to rescue the Dutch Royal Family from the clutches of the Nazis in World War 11 have been honoured.

    The Veterans were belatedly thanked for their bravery during a reception at Dutch Ambassador Baron Willen Bentinck van Schooten's residence in London before heading for the scene of their heroic rescue in the Hook of Holland to lay a wreath of their fallen colleagues

    In May 1940, with the Nazi war machine over-running western Europe, a 600-strong force of Welsh and Irish Guards was sent at short notice to the Netherlands to rescue the Dutch Royals and senior diplomats from Hitler's clutches.

    With Queen Wilhelmina safely on a rescue ship, the soldiers were left to battle their way back to Britain through overwhelming German forces-and incredibly returned with the loss of just 10 men.

    For 60 years, the story of the daring rescue went untold, but when Welsh Guards veteran Dai Tilley saw the Canadian army claim credit for the mission on television, he set out to put the record straight.

    Dai, 81, originally from Cardiff but now of Oregon, USA, said: "It was vital that we rescued the Queen because there is no doubt that the Germans would have used her as a bargaining tool had she been captured - it would have had a massive psychological effect on the Dutch.

    "We were on leave when we were suddenly taken off the train outside Newport and sent to Holland, but it was something we had to do."

    "A few days after the rescue, I was heading to France to fight in the battle of the Channel ports"

    "It was great to be thanked for our efforts after all this time and the 10 survivors who went to the Dutch ambassador's residence were treated very well."

    Brian Keane, secretary of the Merthyr Branch of the Welsh Guards Association, who with his wife, Sandra, tracked down the old soldiers, said: "its been a busy couple of weeks but taking the old soldiers to the scene of the mission was very worthwhile".

    "Seeing Dai's face as he visited the battlefield was worth all the hard work putting it all together".

    Colonel Jos Tans, Dutch military and air attache to the UK, added: "The story of the rescue is quite well known in our country and it was a pleasure to welcome the veterans to the ambassador's residence".

    leaving for a short while will return.
     
  15. williams46

    williams46 WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    What a sad coincidence, he was 86 when my wife and I met him in Oregon, name of the town escapes at present, at the time I thought, 'Hope to be in such good shape as him when I'm that age', he was very bright and sharp. I was probably close to 80 at the time, now 85. I'm unsure, but i believe he served in the US Air Force for quite a number of years after coming to the USA, I meant to ask he when we met but forgot all about it. We had a chat for a time then he said, "How about a nice cup of tea?" so he made a pot of tea and we sat around the table to drink it.

    He showed me a letter from Britain regarding a controversy regarding the Bear skins, some animal rights group, (not the Bears). He countered with a letter of using Ermine? spelling) so that settled the matter.

    Very sad indeed, I was hoping to visit him again in the summer.
     
  16. ramacal

    ramacal 336/102 LAA Regiment (7 Lincolns), RA Patron

    Thanks for that info regarding the men who escorted Wilhelmina to the Hook of Holland. It's great also, that you were able to meet and chat to one of those who took part.

    Regards - Rob
     
  17. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    Each year, Ottawa receives 10,000 tulip bulbs from the Netherlands in recognition of the role that Canadian soldiers played in its liberation during the Second World War, as well as for sheltering the Dutch royal family.
    Fleeing the German invasion of their country, Dutch Crown Princess Juliana and her two daughters lived in exile in Ottawa for four years. During this period, Canada saw its first and only royal birth: Princess Margriet of the Netherlands. She was born on January 19, 1943, at the Ottawa Civic Hospital in a room temporarily declared extraterritorial to ensure that the royal baby would have full Dutch citizenship. When the war ended in 1945 and the royal family returned home, they sent 100,000 tulip bulbs to the City of Ottawa as a gesture of gratitude, and the beautiful flower-filled tradition began.

    In the photo below, we can see Her Royal Highness Princess Juliana holding her daughter Princess Margriet outside their house in Ottawa.
    dutch.jpg
    d2.jpg

    http://collectionscanada.gc.ca/pam_...=genitem.displayItem&rec_nbr=4759512&lang=eng
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2018
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  18. Ramiles

    Ramiles Researching 9th Lancers, 24th L and SRY

    BBC radio: BBC Radio 4 - The Invention of..., The Netherlands, Orange Fever

    Starts a new 3 part series on "The Invention of the Netherlands" on Monday 21st May 2018:

    Orange Fever
    The Invention of...,The Netherlands
    Episode 1 of 3
    Misha Glenny explores a pivot of Western history - the Netherlands.

    "Chances are you think we're talking about Holland. But Holland's a province. Go back two centuries and this was a kingdom that included Belgium and Luxemburg. Before that it was the Austrian Netherlands; before that the Spanish Netherlands. And this region was rich!"

    They call it the golden delta, where the Rhine and the Scheldt run into the chilly North Sea. Amsterdam, Antwerp, Brussels and Bruges are among European history's key centres of trade. Merchants, inventors, philosophers, outsiders - all flocked to the Netherlands. Benelux was the gap between Germany and France, and the home of the EU. But is this a country, and if so when did it begin?

    From the team behind The Invention of Germany, the USA and Brazil. With contributions from Geert Mak, author of "In Europe: Travels Through the Twentieth Century"; Anne Goldgar, author of "Tulipmania", Judith Pollman of Leiden University; Maarten Prak of Utrecht University; and Ben Coates, author of "Why the Dutch are Different".

    The presenter is Misha Glenny, the producer Miles Warde.
     
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