Kinmel Camp before and after the war

Discussion in 'Royal Artillery' started by Chris C, Apr 16, 2019.

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  1. Chris C

    Chris C Canadian researcher

    Does anyone have information on the uses Kinmel Camp served during the war and in the later 40s? There seems to be basically no information online. If you search, you mostly get references to the unrest in WW1.

    From an older discussion, evidently men brought in under National Service did RA training there in 1948.
    RA White Lanyard

    Were there specific unit types trained there? As I've alluded to before, I'm now in possession of two postwar photos of men being instructed on ammunition for the Archer, which might possibly date to 1948-50 (though I am not sure). So there was evidently some anti-tank training going on there. Were men trained on field artillery there as well?
     
  2. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    My Dad was stationed there with the Royal Artillery late 1940/ early 1941 and met my Mum


    from 2008
    Most of the site is now an industrial estate but a part to the south of the A55 road (which cuts through the site) is still in military use: it includes a camp, small-arms ranges and a dry training ground. As well as accommodating up to 250 troops, it is used as a base for training in nearby Snowdonia National

    KINMEL MILITARY CAMP, BODELWYDDAN | Coflein

    regards
    Clive
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2019
    Guy Hudson, ramacal and Chris C like this.
  3. Chris C

    Chris C Canadian researcher

    Hi Clive,

    Do you know what your father's duties were when he was stationed there?

    Regards,
    Chris
     
  4. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Hello Chris.
    The first part 40/41 was general training


    Again in March 1942 with C Battery 11th AA Driver Training Regiment RA qualified as Driver IC at Kinmel Park then posted to to 8th AA Reserve Regiment at Kinmel Park.

    regards
    Clive
     
  5. Chris C

    Chris C Canadian researcher

    Thanks, Clive!
     

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